Zen Buddhist documentary

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#1
Prompted by a thread over on P.IE, I decided to post this old but very interesting BBC documentary from 1977.

In it, the presenter interviews people involved in the various sects within the Japanese Zen tradition, giving a brief synopsis of each one.
At just over 50 minutes long, it's fortunately not too time consuming.

Enjoy.

 
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#2
Prompted by a thread over on P.IE, I decided to post this old but very interesting BBC documentary from 1977.

In it, the presenter interviews people involved in the various sects within the Japanese Zen tradition, giving a brief synopsis of each one.
At just over 50 minutes long, it's fortunately not too time consuming.

Enjoy.
Thanks for that. The connections between Zen and the kamikaze pilots in World War II is something that I have always meant to look into but never got around to. Have you ever read "The Temple of the Golden Pavilion" by the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima? If not you should at some stage, it deals with a Zen monastic novice's descent into evil nihilism with a backdrop of post WWII Japanese society, it is one of the most gripping works of fiction I have ever read.
 
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Heraclitus
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#3
Thanks for that. The connections between Zen and the kamikaze pilots in World War II is something that I have always meant to look into but never got around to. Have you ever read "The Temple of the Golden Pavilion" by the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima? If not you should at some stage, it deals with a Zen monastic novice's descent into evil nihilism with a backdrop of post WWII Japanese society, it is one of the most gripping works of fiction I have ever read.
I'm familiar with Mishima and I've read a few of his short stories, but not that book.
 
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Heraclitus
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#4
Also, another interesting factoid, the man most strongly associated with the introduction of Zen into the west, DT Suzuki, was a staunch Japanese nationalist.

But I wouldn't hold it against him.

During the Meiji restoration the Nihonjinron philosophy took prevalence. It emphasizes the uniqueness of the Japanese. This uniqueness has been attributed to many different factors. Suzuki attributed it to Zen. In his view, Zen embodies the ultimate essence of all philosophy and religion. He pictured Zen as a unique expression of Asian spirituality, which was considered to be superior to the western ways of thinking.

D. T. Suzuki - Wikipedia
 
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#5
Also, another interesting factoid, the man most strongly associated with the introduction of Zen into the west, DT Suzuki, was a staunch Japanese nationalist.

But I wouldn't hold it against him.

D. T. Suzuki - Wikipedia
I think most people instinctively feel that their culture is superior. I'm very suspicious of cultural relativists/egalitarians because I cannot help suspecting that they hold that position from a complete lack of inner morals and values. It can also be interesting to read why people exactly believe their culture is superior to your own.
 
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