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What Are Your Thoughts On Ireland 2040?

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ted08

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Ireland 2040 - National Planning Framework

So a million more people here by 2040, in order to help our economy grow.

That's why I posted this in the economy section, and not immigration.

If this kind of mass-immigration is deemed necessary for a strong economy, will there be an Ireland 2060 plan in 2040, which might plan for, say, two million more people by 2060, and will we need an Ireland 2080 plan then...

Where will these people come from? Where will they live when we already have a massive housing crisis? Will we be able to provide adequate healthcare for everyone? What happens if there's another big recession and we have so many more people to look after?

I worry about this direction. It seems to me like it puts the neoliberal agenda of the elites ahead of the societal wellbeing of the country.

Yes economies need to grow, but is there another way that doesn't involve such a massive influx of people?

Thoughts?
I'll get the population projection figures tomorrow but theyre based on low, medium and high birth rates, and on low, medium and high net migration. The high birth rate and high net migration is where the 1 million figure increase, often quoted as up to 1 million. Not a target or as has been misconstrued as some crazy open border conspiracy theory.
 

Vengeful Glutton

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I think those population projections are based on immigration (from third world countries and war zones). The indigenous population have shag all to contribute to fecundity (see what I did there?). Current fertility rates are propped up by randy furriners.

I'd imagine that the native population will be a minority - probably living a troglodyte like existence in rural caves, subsisting on a diet of Tayto, TK orange and discarded Hummus. Dublin will expand into mini - by European standards - supercity. As for its cultural make up? Melting pot or homogenised pudding? Cosmopolitan, diverse? Sectarian? Now that's a very tasty question for Mystic Meg!

I'd be very surprised if the Islamic and African communities do not dominate. Whether they buy into whatever cultural marxism (or liberalism) has become by 2040 - 2050 or continue to embrace Islam/Christianity is difficult to guess. I'd be fairly confident that the locals can kiss their blarneys goodbye.

Then there's AI...

Martin Rees Our Final Century is worth a read.

 

some1

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Ireland 2040 - National Planning Framework

So a million more people here by 2040, in order to help our economy grow.

That's why I posted this in the economy section, and not immigration.

If this kind of mass-immigration is deemed necessary for a strong economy, will there be an Ireland 2060 plan in 2040, which might plan for, say, two million more people by 2060, and will we need an Ireland 2080 plan then...

Where will these people come from? Where will they live when we already have a massive housing crisis? Will we be able to provide adequate healthcare for everyone? What happens if there's another big recession and we have so many more people to look after?

I worry about this direction. It seems to me like it puts the neoliberal agenda of the elites ahead of the societal wellbeing of the country.

Yes economies need to grow, but is there another way that doesn't involve such a massive influx of people?

Thoughts?
I think, as another poster has stated that the figure of a one million population increase does not mean one million immigrants. Which in itself would still leave the all island population slightly below that of pre famine years.

To date, Ireland has had only ad hoc planning, and consequently the country is slightly shambolic from an organisational and infrastructural point of view.

Whilst the 2040 plan has flaws, it's probably the first real attempt at across the board national planning, and in that context, is to be welcomed. As the old saying goes... Fail to prepare, prepare to fail.
 

some1

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We want the farce to end tho mate. Just a civil comment for any mods present.
 

Rasherhash

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2040 or 2050 - there will likely no longer be anything like the present EU and the present ROI will be in some relationship with the UK
There may be a new Bunreacht to reflect the difference from de Valera's Ireland - religiously and ethnically.
So what youre saying is, 'a United Ireland for defo'.

You de maaan Blow Kiss
 
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The Gaels probably started arriving in Ireland around 2,500 years ago.
you're probably on 75000 posts on the other place by now and you're still obsessed with the " Ulster question "
i remember you said to me years back that when the world was going to war that we still had taigs from the dreary steeples of fermamagh worried about the British question.
today unfortunately we still have prods like you from the dreary murals of the newtownards road worried about the irish question.
The politik has changed. get with the times.
 

Cruimh

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you're probably on 75000 posts on the other place by now
Over 100K, but not sure what point you are trying to make in the context of this thread. Ireland is an ambiguous word, I tried to address the OP taking him to mean Ireland as defined in Bunreacht at present, the 26 counties.
 
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I think, as another poster has stated that the figure of a one million population increase does not mean one million immigrants. Which in itself would still leave the all island population slightly below that of pre famine years.

To date, Ireland has had only ad hoc planning, and consequently the country is slightly shambolic from an organisational and infrastructural point of view.

Whilst the 2040 plan has flaws, it's probably the first real attempt at across the board national planning, and in that context, is to be welcomed. As the old saying goes... Fail to prepare, prepare to fail.
Thanks for your thoughts. I'm still concerned though that not enough consideration has been given to the societal wellbeing of the country with so many more people in it going forward.

Why does such organisational and infrastructural planning necessitate so many more people? With the government clearly hopeless at providing more affordable housing now, when it's badly needed; do you really have confidence that they'll do so when far more again is needed?

I doubt it, and this will mean continually rising rents and house prices, from the crazy current levels.

And that certainly ain't going to help our societal wellbeing...
 

Cruimh

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Thanks for your thoughts. I'm still concerned though that not enough consideration has been given to the societal wellbeing of the country with so many more people in it going forward.

Why does such organisational and infrastructural planning necessitate so many more people? With the government clearly hopeless at providing more affordable housing now, when it's badly needed; do you really have confidence that they'll do so when far more again is needed?

I doubt it, and this will mean continually rising rents and house prices, from the crazy current levels.

And that certainly ain't going to help our societal wellbeing...
The impression I get is that it is more difficult to emigrate from Ireland to North America, Australia and NZ. The housing issue might increase movement to other parts of the EU and the UK. But we need a major overhaul on housing generally across the board in Ireland and the UK. Housing should be treated like food and power and should be regulated rather than being used to give fake booms in the economies - followed by busts - that destroy our environment, encourage corruption and leave a few people very wealthy and most people in debt.
 
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