Was it the Irish who discovered America?

da Vinci

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#1
A Spanish report from 1521 claims a colony of Irish people lived in South Carolina before Christopher Columbus' ships landed.

While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having "discovered" America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey.

“Researchers feel certain that there was a colony of Irish folk living in what is now South Carolina when Christopher Columbus 'thought' he had discovered the New World,” wrote Richard Thornton for The Examiner.

In 1520, Peter Martyr d'Anghiera, a historian, and a professor was appointed by Charles V, ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519, to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies.

Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named "De Orbe Novo" (About the New World). The book has been published and translated numerous times in the centuries since then. The passages concerning the land that would become Georgia and the Carolinas were always included, but generally ignored, says Thornton.

The colony of the Duhares

While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora Indians. However, he also included in his report that the Spanish colonists had a very good relationship with another nearby colony, which Martyr reported to be named Duhare.

Physically, the people of Duhare appeared to be European according to the Spanish colonists in the area. The people of Duhare had red to brown hair, tan skin and gray eyes, and were noticeably taller than the Spanish. According to Spanish accounts, the people of Duhare were Caucasian, though their houses and pottery were similar to those of American Indians.

Irish colony in South Carolina predates Christopher Columbus


Irish lullaby in South Carolina

Researchers began to investigate the similarity of Irish rock carvings to those in the state of South Carolina. One member of the People of One Fire team came across an ancient Irish lullaby entitled “Bainne nam fiadh” - "On milk of deer I was reared. On milk of deer I was nurtured. On milk of deer beneath the ridge of storms on crest of hill and mountain.”

The lullaby has particular significance as the deer were a prominent resource for Duhare people. According to Spanish sources, the Duhare maintained large herds of domesticated deer and made cheese from deer milk. The excess male deer population was fattened with corn for butchering.

The deer stayed in corrals within the villages at night, but grazed in herds in the daytime, accompanied by “deer-herders” and herd dogs. Neighboring peoples knew not to hunt them.


We Irish are an amazing race, our history and culture have touched the 4 corners of the world, we are only learning about our greatness even now. Sadly our history is marred by British rule and traitorous politicians who would deny our greatness and keep us down in the dirt.
 
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#2
A Spanish report from 1521 claims a colony of Irish people lived in South Carolina before Christopher Columbus' ships landed.

While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having "discovered" America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey.

“Researchers feel certain that there was a colony of Irish folk living in what is now South Carolina when Christopher Columbus 'thought' he had discovered the New World,” wrote Richard Thornton for The Examiner.

In 1520, Peter Martyr d'Anghiera, a historian, and a professor was appointed by Charles V, ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519, to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies.

Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named "De Orbe Novo" (About the New World). The book has been published and translated numerous times in the centuries since then. The passages concerning the land that would become Georgia and the Carolinas were always included, but generally ignored, says Thornton.

The colony of the Duhares

While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora Indians. However, he also included in his report that the Spanish colonists had a very good relationship with another nearby colony, which Martyr reported to be named Duhare.

Physically, the people of Duhare appeared to be European according to the Spanish colonists in the area. The people of Duhare had red to brown hair, tan skin and gray eyes, and were noticeably taller than the Spanish. According to Spanish accounts, the people of Duhare were Caucasian, though their houses and pottery were similar to those of American Indians.

Irish colony in South Carolina predates Christopher Columbus


Irish lullaby in South Carolina

Researchers began to investigate the similarity of Irish rock carvings to those in the state of South Carolina. One member of the People of One Fire team came across an ancient Irish lullaby entitled “Bainne nam fiadh” - "On milk of deer I was reared. On milk of deer I was nurtured. On milk of deer beneath the ridge of storms on crest of hill and mountain.”

The lullaby has particular significance as the deer were a prominent resource for Duhare people. According to Spanish sources, the Duhare maintained large herds of domesticated deer and made cheese from deer milk. The excess male deer population was fattened with corn for butchering.

The deer stayed in corrals within the villages at night, but grazed in herds in the daytime, accompanied by “deer-herders” and herd dogs. Neighboring peoples knew not to hunt them.


We Irish are an amazing race, our history and culture have touched the 4 corners of the world, we are only learning about our greatness even now. Sadly our history is marred by British rule and traitorous politicians who would deny our greatness and keep us down in the dirt.
Our maritime history is ignored though, since Independence we effectively turned our backs on the sea, what could be our greatest source of food, energy, recreation we ignore, rather foolishly as an island people, I used to think this was always the case, that our fisheries were traded in favour of agriculture is old news, that we were more inclined to see cattle as a source of wealth like many other people in the world, even an Táin seems to support this view.

However there is a very interesting book by a British Naval historian called the Conquest of the North Atlantic, which gives the Irish their due as pioneers in the discovery of the North Atlantic, Irish monks sailing in leather hulled currachs traveled up along the Western Isles of Scotland, the Faroe Islands may have been inhabited by the Irish before the Viking arrived, out west to Iceland which was five day sail from Slyne head, and they were there for a hundred years in small numbers before the Vikings found it, (another tragedy, imagine we colonized it, a Gaelic Isle we could retreat to and get reinforcements against the British), how many of these brave peaceful men, their hearts brimming with love for a just God, and seeking out the cold empty places to know Him better, died in frozen wastes?

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwi8luyeo_rdAhXsK8AKHf3lBdYQFjAAegQIChAB&url=https://www.amazon.com/Conquest-North-Atlantic-G-Marcus/dp/1843833166&usg=AOvVaw3qTtASeCleocUcpe6TWyCp
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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#3
Our maritime history is ignored though, since Independence we effectively turned our backs on the sea, what could be our greatest source of food, energy, recreation we ignore, rather foolishly as an island people, I used to think this was always the case, that our fisheries were traded in favour of agriculture is old news, that we were more inclined to see cattle as a source of wealth like many other people in the world, even an Táin seems to support this view.

However there is a very interesting book by a British Naval historian called the Conquest of the North Atlantic, which gives the Irish their due as pioneers in the discovery of the North Atlantic, Irish monks sailing in leather hulled currachs traveled up along the Western Isles of Scotland, the Faroe Islands may have been inhabited by the Irish before the Viking arrived, out west to Iceland which was five day sail from Slyne head, and they were there for a hundred years in small numbers before the Vikings found it, (another tragedy, imagine we colonized it, a Gaelic Isle we could retreat to and get reinforcements against the British), how many of these brave peaceful men, their hearts brimming with love for a just God, and seeking out the cold empty places to know Him better, died in frozen wastes?

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwi8luyeo_rdAhXsK8AKHf3lBdYQFjAAegQIChAB&url=https://www.amazon.com/Conquest-North-Atlantic-G-Marcus/dp/1843833166&usg=AOvVaw3qTtASeCleocUcpe6TWyCp
St. Brendan was a great sailor and supposedly traveled far and wide, so anything is possible.
 

TheWexfordInn

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#4
St. Brendan was a great sailor and supposedly traveled far and wide, so anything is possible.
I remember when at the Gaeltacht a long time going visiting "Cuas an Bhodaigh" where it is claimed that St Brendan departed to sail for the new world. I remember being rather sceptical about his having been able to cross the Atlantic, particularly to do with the logistics eg how would he have known how much water to take along?
 
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#5
I remember when at the Gaeltacht a long time going visiting "Cuas an Bhodaigh" where it is claimed that St Brendan departed to sail for the new world. I remember being rather sceptical about his having been able to cross the Atlantic, particularly to do with the logistics eg how would he have known how much water to take along?
They could have caught rainwater or caught birds and drank the blood, as well to bolster what they brought, but, I don't think they knew how long it would take, that's the point of exploration. Also as monks they were used to a life of deprivation.
I certainly think its very probable. Tim Severian has recreated the voyage in a currach and proved it could be done.
 

Catalpa

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#6
TBH its a nice story but I honestly don't think there was an 'Irish' colony in South Carolina pre Columbian times

But its just about possible that Irish Monks reached Newfoundland

Inevitably over the course of millenia that ships from Europe & Africa were swept out to sea and ended up in the Americas

Whether any people survived is another matter ….
 
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