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Viktor Orbán: Native Population Decline Is The "Sickness Of Europe"

IrishJohn

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Irish priorities
1. Lgbt rights
2. Abortion to birth
3. Open borders
4. Legalise weed to keep the population drugged.
....
996. Reduce the National debt
997. Affordable homes for our Children
998. Higher wages to stop Irish leaving
999. Family life
I agree with number 4.

The idea that a plant can be illegal is insane.
 

IrishJohn

PI Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2018
Messages
2,125
Likes
4,667
Irish priorities
1. Lgbt rights
2. Abortion to birth
3. Open borders
4. Legalise weed to keep the population drugged.
....
996. Reduce the National debt
997. Affordable homes for our Children
998. Higher wages to stop Irish leaving
999. Family life
Another thing the government want to bring in is suicide on demand.
 
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Unfortunately, a birthrate crisis has accompanied most cultural collapses (notably Greek and Roman cultures).
People will go on, but history tells us it's unlikely our cultural identity will, if those cultural values have mutated anyway from family (and, by extension, community) values.
its difficult to have a 'community' when groups that used to meet regularly (Mass, the pub, the workplace etc) have been transformed into individuals who stare at screens all evening.
 
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As families go, so goes the nation. You cannot fix the population decline of the natives without reversing the moral and spiritual decay of values within the family, which in many respects came out of an unsustainable economic boom whose bust and boom again was directed by the same shower of interchangable Dolly Parton fans we have running us now. We have gone from liberty to decadence or dependence to bondage. The plan is to replace the native population with foreigners and run this country as a business for outside interests and those at the top until there's nothing irish left about the place, brazilification. They have no plans on helping falling Irish birth rates, fixing our housing/services or advocating for any form of moral and spiritual guidance as a people. Replacing our own flag with pride flag flag at every turn should give you all the clues you need on what they worship.

The west in general has hit its peak already, and the carcass is being picked.

There's a small window left to get some form of representatives in the dail that can counter the splintered but predominantly anti irish parties that are in power or are in waiting at the moment, and if such an economic fall happens sooner rather then later, and the next government collapses, you might be able to get enough in the next time that can steer this country on a better path, but it will require very hard times to get the people to respond and reject apathy for liberty again. You cannot build a functioning society on shit, and that is all we are being fed right now.
 

Custard Surprise

PI Member
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Mar 4, 2019
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Location
Africa part 2 (Formerly Ireland)
This 'we must breed' is a load of bollox.

We can figure out how to preserve ourselves even with a declining population. It is the idea that every economy must grow every year - to pay off the usurers - that should be changed.

Simple things like investing in AI for a start. Look at Japan (also an ageing population) you won't see many manual car washes for example. In Ireland however, there are 6 Romanian or Polish blokes hand washing cars in every supermarket car park and petrol station / garage... Is this really necessary?

I can't stand the fact that Ireland (mainly Dublin) is being pimped out to compete with the supposed "glamours" capitals of the world like Berlin, Paris and London etc. All once lovely places but now turned shite holes due to mass immigration and multiculturalism. Globalism is a failed experiment, It hasn't worked anywhere in the world but there's too much money in it for some sections of society.

As for native figures, they are now probably skewed beyond recognition due to the new Irish who are literally coloring the figures.
As for London...
" At the 2011 census, London had a population of 8,173,941. Of this number, 44.9% were White British."
I can't wait to see the 2021 census figures! Unless we gain traction we are doomed to follow in London's footsteps. Nationalism in Ireland is still viewed in a negative light, especially when our "leaders" are all pro EU and are backed by the RTE propaganda machine.
 
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The conventional wisdom is that an aging population is toxic for economic growth. Who will do all the work? How will we pay for all those old people’s medical and welfare programs? Economists like to call it the dependency ratio: the size of the working-age population relative to those too old (or too young) to have a job. And they like to show scary projections of how this demographic crisis is coming to get us.
...
The truth is that economists don’t know much about how an aging population will affect us.
...
But Maestas cautions that the projections are based on historical trends and may not be accurate predictions. Her guess is that productivity has fallen as the population ages because the most skilled and experienced people have left in larger numbers, since they’re more successful and wealthier and can afford to retire. If she’s right, then it’s not that workers become less productive as they age, but that the most productive ones stop working.
...
“Despite all the stressing about aging,” says Daron Acemoglu, an MIT economist, “there is surprisingly very little evidence that aging societies are worse economically.” Looking at GDP data from 1990 to 2015, Acemoglu and Boston University’s Pascual Restrepo found no correlation between aging demographics and slowed economic growth. In fact, countries like South Korea, Japan, and Germany, all with rapidly aging populations, are actually doing well.

One possible reason? Automation. Countries with aging workforces have been quicker to adopt industrial robots to compensate. The resulting boost to productivity is “softening the doom and gloom around aging,” says Acemoglu, who says he went into the research expecting that the impact of aging “wasn’t as dark” as many suspected but was surprised by “the total lack of any evidence of negative effects from aging.”
...
Beyond being scientifically disingenuous, the aging-as-a-disease crowd is promoting a dangerous message. Not only does treating aging as a disease cast a negative light on getting old, but it distracts us from the most pressing issue: How do we keep ourselves productive and healthy as we grow older?
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Academic research indicates that Zuckerberg and Khosla are wrong. In a rigorous study that looked at 2.7 million company founders, economists at MIT, the US Census Bureau, and Northwestern University concluded the best entrepreneurs are middle-aged. The fastest-growing startups were created by founders with an average age of 45. In a 2018 paper they found that a 50-year-old entrepreneur was nearly twice as likely to build a highly successful company as a 30-year-old. And contrary to Khosla’s tweet, it turns out that industry experience was a significant positive in predicting success.

Blatant age bias might also explain why Silicon Valley has done such a terrible job of creating startups in biomedicine, clean energy, or other areas requiring scientific expertise and knowledge. In earlier research, one of the authors of last year’s paper, Benjamin Jones, an economist at Northwestern, presented evidence that most great scientific achievements in the physical sciences and medicine come in middle age, not from the precocious young.

It’s a message largely lost on Silicon Valley and its youth-fetishizing investors—it seems that billionaires are, after all, set in their ways.
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The harm won’t just be economic. The financial and emotional hit to older workers unable to find a job because of bias is devastating to families and communities. And it’s a pain caused by our own narrow thinking and limited imaginations. Ageism is a particularly pernicious bias because it is a fear of our own selves. We’re all going to get old (if we’re lucky) and die.

But while aging might be inevitable, becoming unproductive is not. We might be facing a demographic tsunami, but we don’t have to be overwhelmed by it. We can take the high ground.
https://economics.mit.edu/files/13126 Secular Stagnation? The Effect of Aging on Economic Growth in the Age of Automation
Several recent theories emphasize the negative effects of an aging population on economic growth, either because of the lower labor force participation and productivity of older workers or because aging will create an excess of savings over desired investment, leading to secular stagnation. We show that there is no such negative relationship in the data. If anything, countries experiencing more rapid aging have grown more in recent decades. We suggest that this counterintuitive finding might reflect the more rapid adoption of automation technologies in countries undergoing more pronounced demographic changes, and provide evidence and theoretical underpinnings for this argument.
...
This paper establishes that, contrary to a range of theories including recent ones on demographics based secular stagnation, there is no negative relationship between between population aging and slower growth of GDP per capita. This is a major puzzle for several theories that have become
very popular over the last several years.

One possible explanation for this pattern is the endogenous response of technology—in particular, the adoption of technologies performing tasks previously undertaken by labor. We document that countries undergoing more rapid population aging have adopted more robots, although we do recognize that this evidence is neither causal nor does it establish that the adoption of robots is the mechanism that neutralizes the potential negative effects of population aging on economic growth.

We also demonstrate that models of directed technological change can account for the lack of such a negative relationship, and could generate a positive relationship, between population aging and economic growth.

There is a clear need for future work that systematically investigates the relationship between demographic change and GDP growth as well as the channels via which this relationship works.
If its GDP per capita that you care about, there is nothing out there saying there is an issue with an aging population for now if you know what you are doing, but if all you care about is GDP as a sole metric, where you try increase it by flooding the country with people irrespective of their abilities or its effects on society, so that the lions share of said money goes to the correct people, then yes an aging population is a problem.
 
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