US Elections 2018 Mid-term. Rolling thread

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Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahhahahahahaha! That is the best oxymoron ever uttered since military intelligence!

They are gathering places where the atavistic worship Ba'al and preach subversion and worse.
Can't stand the truth can you?
I was guest in a Quran school every Friday evening for two years in a place in Southern Germany in the Seventies.
Their god is the same as yours.
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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Swords said a few days ago that she is sad to see so many people forgetting about the first part of the Bible. That book is still valid.
You seem unable to rebut my previous point. I wonder why...

Stay tuned for the next Truck of Peace, Knife of Peace or Gang Rape of Peace attack. Chances are, Christians won't be implicated in the aforementioned.
 
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You seem unable to rebut my point. I wonder why...

Stay tuned for the next Truck of Peace attack, Knife of Peace stabbing, or Gang Rape of Peace. Chances are, Christians won't be implicated in the aforementioned.
You are a well read man and I am sure you recognize this:



An uneasy peace ruled in Jerusalem. Saladin's victory against the Crusaders had cost the Muslims dearly, both in the loss of troops and in the depletion of the royal treasury. Saladin was resolved to rule with civilized humanity as far as possible. But it was an uneasy peace, with Jews, Christians, and the newly victorious Muslims all suspicious of one another.


Thus when Saladin requested an audience with Nathan, a leading Jewish merchant, the latter was very apprehensive about the Sultan's motivation. Nathan was known far and wide not only for his successes in commerce, but also for his skills in diplomacy and negotiation. Jews, Christians, and Muslims alike called him Nathan the Wise.


Nathan's suspicions were well founded, for Saladin was indeed looking to replenish his exhausted coffers with a loan or a gift from his wealthy Jewish subject. Too civil to openly demand such a tribute from the peace-loving Nathan, the Sultan instead masked his request in the form of a theological question.


"Your reputation for wisdom is great," said the Sultan. "You must have studied the great religions. Tell me, which is the best, Judaism, Islam, or Christianity?"


"Sultan, I am a Jew," replied Nathan.


"And I a Muslim," interrupted Saladin, "and between us stands the Christian. But the three faiths contradict one another. They cannot all be true. Tell me the results of your own wise deliberations. Which religion is best?"


Nathan recognized the trap at once. Any answer except "Islam" would offend Saladin the Muslim, whereas any answer except "Judaism" would place his own integrity under question. Thus, instead of giving a direct answer, Nathan responded by relating a parable to Saladin:


In the Orient in ancient times there lived a man who possessed a ring of inestimable worth. Its stone was an opal that emitted a hundred colors, but its real value lay in its ability to make its wearer beloved of God and man. The ring passed from father to most favored son for many generations, until finally its owner was a father with three sons, all equally deserving. Unable to decide which of the three sons was most worthy, the father commissioned a master artisan to make two exact copies of the ring, then gave each son a ring, and each son believed that he alone had inherited the original and true ring.​
But instead of harmony, the father's plan brought only discord to his heirs. Shortly after the father died, each of the sons claimed to be the sole ruler of the father's house, each basing his claim to authority on the ring given to him by the father. The discord grew even stronger and more hateful when a close examination of the rings failed to disclose any differences.​

"But wait," interrupted Saladin, "surely you do not mean to tell me that there are no differences between Islam, Judaism, and Christianity!"


"You are right, Sultan," replied Nathan. "Their teachings and practices differ in ways that can be seen by all. However, in each case, the teachings and practices are based on beliefs and faith, beliefs and faith that at their roots are the same. Which of us can prove that our beliefs and our faith are more reliable than those of others?"


"I understand," said Saladin. "Now continue with your tale."


"The story is nearly at its end," replied Nathan.


The dispute among the brothers grew until their case was finally brought before a judge. After hearing the history of the original ring and its miraculous powers, the judge pronounced his conclusion: "The authentic ring," he said, "had the power to make its owner beloved of God and man, but each of your rings has brought only hatred and strife. None of you is loved by others; each loves only himself. Therefore I must conclude that none of you has the original ring. Your father must have lost it, then attempted to hide his loss by having three counterfeit rings made, and these are the rings that cause you so much grief."​
The judge continued: "Or it may be that your father, weary of the tyranny of a single ring, made duplicates, which he gave to you. Let each of you demonstrate his belief in the power of his ring by conducting his life in such a manner that he fully merits -- as anciently promised -- the love of God and man.​

"Marvelous! Marvelous!" exclaimed Saladin. "Your tale has set my mind at rest. You may go."


"Sultan, was there nothing else you wished from me?" asked Nathan.


"No. Nothing."


"Then may I take the liberty to make a request of you. My trade of late has brought me unexpected wealth, and in these uncertain times I need a secure repository. Would you be willing to accept my recent earnings as loan or deposit?"


The Sultan gladly acceded to Nathan's wish.


And thus Saladin gained from his wise Jewish subject both material and spiritual benefit, and Nathan the Wise found a safe haven for his wealth and earned the respect of the Islamic Sultan.
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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You are a well read man and I am sure you recognize this:



An uneasy peace ruled in Jerusalem. Saladin's victory against the Crusaders had cost the Muslims dearly, both in the loss of troops and in the depletion of the royal treasury. Saladin was resolved to rule with civilized humanity as far as possible. But it was an uneasy peace, with Jews, Christians, and the newly victorious Muslims all suspicious of one another.


Thus when Saladin requested an audience with Nathan, a leading Jewish merchant, the latter was very apprehensive about the Sultan's motivation. Nathan was known far and wide not only for his successes in commerce, but also for his skills in diplomacy and negotiation. Jews, Christians, and Muslims alike called him Nathan the Wise.


Nathan's suspicions were well founded, for Saladin was indeed looking to replenish his exhausted coffers with a loan or a gift from his wealthy Jewish subject. Too civil to openly demand such a tribute from the peace-loving Nathan, the Sultan instead masked his request in the form of a theological question.


"Your reputation for wisdom is great," said the Sultan. "You must have studied the great religions. Tell me, which is the best, Judaism, Islam, or Christianity?"


"Sultan, I am a Jew," replied Nathan.


"And I a Muslim," interrupted Saladin, "and between us stands the Christian. But the three faiths contradict one another. They cannot all be true. Tell me the results of your own wise deliberations. Which religion is best?"


Nathan recognized the trap at once. Any answer except "Islam" would offend Saladin the Muslim, whereas any answer except "Judaism" would place his own integrity under question. Thus, instead of giving a direct answer, Nathan responded by relating a parable to Saladin:


In the Orient in ancient times there lived a man who possessed a ring of inestimable worth. Its stone was an opal that emitted a hundred colors, but its real value lay in its ability to make its wearer beloved of God and man. The ring passed from father to most favored son for many generations, until finally its owner was a father with three sons, all equally deserving. Unable to decide which of the three sons was most worthy, the father commissioned a master artisan to make two exact copies of the ring, then gave each son a ring, and each son believed that he alone had inherited the original and true ring.​
But instead of harmony, the father's plan brought only discord to his heirs. Shortly after the father died, each of the sons claimed to be the sole ruler of the father's house, each basing his claim to authority on the ring given to him by the father. The discord grew even stronger and more hateful when a close examination of the rings failed to disclose any differences.​

"But wait," interrupted Saladin, "surely you do not mean to tell me that there are no differences between Islam, Judaism, and Christianity!"


"You are right, Sultan," replied Nathan. "Their teachings and practices differ in ways that can be seen by all. However, in each case, the teachings and practices are based on beliefs and faith, beliefs and faith that at their roots are the same. Which of us can prove that our beliefs and our faith are more reliable than those of others?"


"I understand," said Saladin. "Now continue with your tale."


"The story is nearly at its end," replied Nathan.


The dispute among the brothers grew until their case was finally brought before a judge. After hearing the history of the original ring and its miraculous powers, the judge pronounced his conclusion: "The authentic ring," he said, "had the power to make its owner beloved of God and man, but each of your rings has brought only hatred and strife. None of you is loved by others; each loves only himself. Therefore I must conclude that none of you has the original ring. Your father must have lost it, then attempted to hide his loss by having three counterfeit rings made, and these are the rings that cause you so much grief."​
The judge continued: "Or it may be that your father, weary of the tyranny of a single ring, made duplicates, which he gave to you. Let each of you demonstrate his belief in the power of his ring by conducting his life in such a manner that he fully merits -- as anciently promised -- the love of God and man.​

"Marvelous! Marvelous!" exclaimed Saladin. "Your tale has set my mind at rest. You may go."


"Sultan, was there nothing else you wished from me?" asked Nathan.


"No. Nothing."


"Then may I take the liberty to make a request of you. My trade of late has brought me unexpected wealth, and in these uncertain times I need a secure repository. Would you be willing to accept my recent earnings as loan or deposit?"


The Sultan gladly acceded to Nathan's wish.


And thus Saladin gained from his wise Jewish subject both material and spiritual benefit, and Nathan the Wise found a safe haven for his wealth and earned the respect of the Islamic Sultan.
Riffing on Nathan der Weise? Despite your protestations, corner any honest Moslem and put the heat on him, and he'll tell you that Islam's raison d'être is to break the will of the infidel (either through voluntary or coerced conversion or murder) and Moslems simply will not stop until this is fulfilled. Their "god" demands nothing less.
 
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Riffing on Nathan der Weise? Despite your protestations, corner any honest Moslem and put the heat on him, and he'll tell you that Islam's raison d'être is to break the will of the infidel (either through voluntary or coerced conversion or murder) and Moslems simply will not stop until this is fulfilled.
You do not seem to understand the story.
Interestingly Lessing was living in the "Time of EnLIGHTenment".
I noticed a sort of "Zeitenwende" in the last few years. Many people got struck with blindness...in heart and mind... and the Dark Ages are threatening to come back...
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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You do not seem to understand the story.
That's exactly right. It's a story, not a primary account.

Interestingly Lessing was living in the "Time of EnLIGHTenment".
I'm more a fan of Sturm und Drang and Wagner.

Interestingly Lessing was living in the "Time of EnLIGHTenment"
You mean the same Enlightenment that gave birth to moral relativism, secular humanism, the French Revolution, the Terror and the Directory? No, thanks, I prefer to remain benighted.

I noticed a sort of "Zeitenwende" in the last few years. Many people got struck with blindness...in heart and mind... and the Dark Ages are threatening to come back...
You think this Zeitenwende might be blowback for the West's having thrown the borders wide open?

I noticed a sort of "Zeitenwende" in the last few years. Many people got struck with blindness...in heart and mind... and the Dark Ages are threatening to come back...
Tribalism predates the Flood, going back to Cain and Abel. What you are too shame-faced to admit is that tribalism will always, always, always trump egalitarianism. Forcing diversity upon a people (especially without their consent) engenders resentment, animosity and will eventually lead to political destabilization, widespread strife and worse.

If you want to hitch your cart to that horse because you need to assuage your guilty conscience and expiate your sins, hook up the bridle and hold those reins tightly. Not this cowboy...
 
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That's exactly right. It's a story, not a primary account.



I'm more a fan of Sturm und Drang and Wagner.



You mean the same Enlightenment that gave birth to moral relativism, secular humanism, the French Revolution, the Terror and the Directory? No, thanks, I prefer to remain benighted.



Tribalism predates the Flood, going back to Cain and Abel. What you are too shame-faced to admit is that tribalism will always, always, always trump egalitarianism. Forcing diversity upon a people (especially without their consent) engenders resentment, animosity and will eventually lead to political destabilization, widespread strife and worse.

If you want to hitch your cart to that horse because you need to assuage your guilty conscience and expiate your sins, hook up the bridle and hold those reins tightly. Not this cowboy...

You understand what a parable is?

Always the same with some people- they do need enemies. Cannot exist without them. Must be an inferiority complex.
Not much difference between a yank from 1968 and 2018....
Your father went after the Soviets- you go after the Muslims....

I have no guilt complex. I simply noticed how things are connected with each other.
Butterfly-Congo. Storm-Philippines.

Tribalism...worked wonders for us so far. Sigh....

You are stuck in the swamp, my friend. I hope you find the light one day....
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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You understand what a parable is?
Uhh... I think Jesus was the sole author of the Parables.

Always the same with some people- they do need enemies.
Fences make good neighbors and large fences make better neighbors.

Your father went after the Soviets
Do tell. I never knew we were involved in a hot war with the Soviets and that he was conscripted for that.

I have no guilt complex. I simply noticed how things are connected with each other.
No, you're deracinated and you've resigned yourself to your fate and have embraced it.

Tribalism...worked wonders for us so far. Sigh....
Tribalism is what makes the world diverse and nations distinct, not globalism.

You are stuck in the swamp, my friend. I hope you find the light one day....
And there I shall remain. To quote Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg and apply it to you and yours, "You cannot expect people who have broken their spine once or twice to stand up straight when a new decision has to be made."
 
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