Trump backing Globalist Coup Attempt in Venezuela?

George Dillon

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Yes, it's true - half a million Colombians live in Venezuela. There are tens of thousands of Arabs, and tens of thousands of Asians. Tens of thousands of Brazilians. In fact, Venezuela is the Latin American country that is home to the most migrants.

Most of those leaving Venezuela today are either migrants returning home - or supporters of the terrorists. The vast majority of Venezuelans are staying in Venezuela - and defending their country against US backed terrorists.


But you said "there are five million Colombian immigrants living and working in Venezuela". Now it's down to 10% of that.

If your first claim was a slip of the pen, that's OK.

Half a million still seems very high, but it's much nearer the mark than the original figure you offered.

Certainly quite a few Colombians did go to Venezuela during the worst years of the FARC violence, and it's credible that a number of them married or made other roots that now compel them to stay. The border people on both sides are pretty identical in culture and language. At one time they formed one nation. The only difference is in poverty; the Colombians are poor, but the Venezuelans are infinitely poorer.
But if they have any kind of a family support network remaining in Colombia, they would be long gone. The border is quite open on the Colombian side. though the Venezuelan paramilitaries do close their side often. When the Venezuelan side is open, there isn't exactly a rush to go in.
 

GodsDog

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bizarre: pulled in 30k last week. not everyone's a fool! you know it's standard procedure among some to attack the source off something you don't like then attack the person. why don't you just adopt some proper ideas. that would be a wiser idea!

stripping and giving blow jobs to fat old men pays better than I thought!! :p
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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But you said "there are five million Colombian immigrants living and working in Venezuela". Now it's down to 10% of that.

If your first claim was a slip of the pen, that's OK.

Half a million still seems very high, but it's much nearer the mark than the original figure you offered.

Certainly quite a few Colombians did go to Venezuela during the worst years of the FARC violence, and it's credible that a number of them married or made other roots that now compel them to stay. The border people on both sides are pretty identical in culture and language. At one time they formed one nation. The only difference is in poverty; the Colombians are poor, but the Venezuelans are infinitely poorer.
But if they have any kind of a family support network remaining in Colombia, they would be long gone. The border is quite open on the Colombian side. though the Venezuelan paramilitaries do close their side often. When the Venezuelan side is open, there isn't exactly a rush to go in.

Yes, five million Colombians live in Venezuela (typo above), 300,000 Equadorians live there, another 300,000 Peruvians. There are nearly half a million Europeans living there - even some Yanks live there. These people are not leaving. They see no need to leave. Venezuelans are momentarily strapped for hard currency - because of US sanctions. But, they have unimaginable wealth in their national store. Colombians, in contrast, are inherently poor. Nature has not blessed them the way she has blessed Venezuela. And Colombians still live under a violent Oligarchy that hates the poor and sees the exterminating them as the best thing to do.
 

GodsDog

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I don't buy it. Frank Whytle invented the jet engine which was groundbreaking. Not only did he get no backing by British investors but he got no backing from the British government, He eventually went to America where he did better. It proves that private capital can be stupid in one country and clever in another. There is a good you tube video on Frank Whytle, I highly recommend it,
There is just so much half digested / complete horseshit passed off as fact on this site!
No wonder so many posters are seemingly drowning in their own ignorance.
All for want of a 5 second google!

The earliest attempts at airbreathing jet engines were hybrid designs in which an external power source first compressed air, which was then mixed with fuel and burned for jet thrust. The Caproni Campini N.1, and the Japanese Tsu-11 engine intended to power Ohka kamikaze planes towards the end of World War II were unsuccessful.

Albert Fonó's ramjet-cannonball from 1915

Even before the start of World War II, engineers were beginning to realize that engines driving propellers were approaching limits due to issues related to propeller efficiency,[2] which declined as blade tips approached the speed of sound. If aircraft performance were to increase beyond such a barrier, a different propulsion mechanism was necessary. This was the motivation behind the development of the gas turbine engine, the commonest form of jet engine.

The key to a practical jet engine was the gas turbine, extracting power from the engine itself to drive the compressor. The gas turbine was not a new idea: the patent for a stationary turbine was granted to John Barber in England in 1791. The first gas turbine to successfully run self-sustaining was built in 1903 by Norwegian engineer Ægidius Elling.[3] Such engines did not reach manufacture due to issues of safety, reliability, weight and, especially, sustained operation.

The first patent for using a gas turbine to power an aircraft was filed in 1921 by Frenchman Maxime Guillaume.[4] His engine was an axial-flow turbojet, but was never constructed, as it would have required considerable advances over the state of the art in compressors. Alan Arnold Griffith published An Aerodynamic Theory of Turbine Design in 1926 leading to experimental work at the RAE.

The Whittle W.2/700 engine flew in the Gloster E.28/39, the first British aircraft to fly with a turbojet engine, and the Gloster Meteor

In 1928, RAF College Cranwell cadet Frank Whittle formally submitted his ideas for a turbojet to his superiors.[5] In October 1929 he developed his ideas further.[6] On 16 January 1930 in England, Whittle submitted his first patent (granted in 1932).[7] The patent showed a two-stage axial compressor feeding a single-sided centrifugal compressor. Practical axial compressors were made possible by ideas from A.A.Griffith in a seminal paper in 1926 ("An Aerodynamic Theory of Turbine Design"). Whittle would later concentrate on the simpler centrifugal compressor only. Whittle was unable to interest the government in his invention, and development continued at a slow pace.

Heinkel He 178, the world's first aircraft to fly purely on turbojet power

In 1935 Hans von Ohain started work on a similar design in Germany, both compressor and turbine being radial, on opposite sides of same disc, initially unaware of Whittle's work.[8] Von Ohain's first device was strictly experimental and could run only under external power, but he was able to demonstrate the basic concept. Ohain was then introduced to Ernst Heinkel, one of the larger aircraft industrialists of the day, who immediately saw the promise of the design. Heinkel had recently purchased the Hirth engine company, and Ohain and his master machinist Max Hahn were set up there as a new division of the Hirth company. They had their first HeS 1 centrifugal engine running by September 1937. Unlike Whittle's design, Ohain used hydrogen as fuel, supplied under external pressure. Their subsequent designs culminated in the gasoline-fuelled HeS 3 of 5 kN (1,100 lbf), which was fitted to Heinkel's simple and compact He 178 airframe and flown by Erich Warsitz in the early morning of August 27, 1939, from Rostock-Marienehe aerodrome, an impressively short time for development. The He 178 was the world's first jet plane.[9] Heinkel applied for a US patent covering the Aircraft Power Plant by Hans Joachim Pabst von Ohain in May 31, 1939; patent number US2256198, with M Hahn referenced as inventor.

A cutaway of the Junkers Jumo 004 engine

Austrian Anselm Franz of Junkers' engine division (Junkers Motoren or "Jumo") introduced the axial-flow compressor in their jet engine. Jumo was assigned the next engine number in the RLM 109-0xx numbering sequence for gas turbine aircraft powerplants, "004", and the result was the Jumo 004 engine. After many lesser technical difficulties were solved, mass production of this engine started in 1944 as a powerplant for the world's first jet-fighter aircraft, the Messerschmitt Me 262 (and later the world's first jet-bomber aircraft, the Arado Ar 234). A variety of reasons conspired to delay the engine's availability, causing the fighter to arrive too late to improve Germany's position in World War II, however this was the first jet engine to be used in service.

Gloster Meteor F.3s. The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' only jet aircraft to achieve combat operations during World War II.

Meanwhile, in Britain the Gloster E28/39 had its maiden flight on 15 May 1941 and the Gloster Meteor finally entered service with the RAF in July 1944. These were powered by turbojet engines from Power Jets Ltd., set up by Frank Whittle. The first two operational turbojet aircraft, the Messerschmitt Me 262 and then the Gloster Meteor entered service within three months of each other in 1944.

Following the end of the war the German jet aircraft and jet engines were extensively studied by the victorious allies and contributed to work on early Soviet and US jet fighters. The legacy of the axial-flow engine is seen in the fact that practically all jet engines on fixed-wing aircraft have had some inspiration from this design.

By the 1950s the jet engine was almost universal in combat aircraft, with the exception of cargo, liaison and other specialty types. By this point some of the British designs were already cleared for civilian use, and had appeared on early models like the de Havilland Comet and Avro Canada Jetliner. By the 1960s all large civilian aircraft were also jet powered, leaving the piston engine in low-cost niche roles such as cargo flights.

The efficiency of turbojet engines was still rather worse than piston engines, but by the 1970s, with the advent of high-bypass turbofan jet engines (an innovation not foreseen by the early commentators such as Edgar Buckingham, at high speeds and high altitudes that seemed absurd to them), fuel efficiency was about the same as the best piston and propeller engines.[10]
And FYI his name was "Whittle" not "Whytle"
 
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George Dillon

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Yes, five million Colombians live in Venezuela (typo above), 300,000 Equadorians live there, another 300,000 Peruvians. There are nearly half a million Europeans living there - even some Yanks live there. These people are not leaving. They see no need to leave. Venezuelans are momentarily strapped for hard currency - because of US sanctions. But, they have unimaginable wealth in their national store. Colombians, in contrast, are inherently poor. Nature has not blessed them the way she has blessed Venezuela. And Colombians still live under a violent Oligarchy that hates the poor and sees the exterminating them as the best thing to do.


Once again you show utter ignorance. I won't comment on Venezuela's resources, since I don't know that country.

But I do know Colombia. It is blessed with several climates, from desert to cool mountain to tropical. It has a successful agriculture, from cattle to; tropical fruits to flower cultivation. The flowers in vases in New York offices tomorrow were cut last night in the flower growing areas near Bogota. Colombia has access to two of the great oceans of the world, Atlantic and Pacific. It has vast mineral resources, and is the Number One producer of emeralds in the world. It has a thriving tourism industry....

But why am I bothering to tell you all this--you're a Know Nothing who won't admit it. I'm wasting my time.
 

jon 1000's of irish f

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We were talking about the fact that you are poor and probably homeless in a Capitalist economy. I'm sure you have no wife or children. Very sad really. You'd do much better in a Socialist society.
you really are mentally ill! Autism Test - Short Autism Screening Test i am actually semi retired on a tropical island bit like venezuela here a photo of my front room. but you can't believe that either. mind too stunted!
 
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Tadhg Gaelach

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Once again you show utter ignorance. I won't comment on Venezuela's resources, since I don't know that country.

But I do know Colombia. It is blessed with several climates, from desert to cool mountain to tropical. It has a successful agriculture, from cattle to; tropical fruits to flower cultivation. The flowers in vases in New York offices tomorrow were cut last night in the flower growing areas near Bogota. Colombia has access to two of the great oceans of the world, Atlantic and Pacific. It has vast mineral resources, and is the Number One producer of emeralds in the world. It has a thriving tourism industry....

But why am I bothering to tell you all this--you're a Know Nothing who won't admit it. I'm wasting my time.

Agriculture is important - but it won't make any nation rich. Sadly, however, Colombian agriculture doesn't even seem able to feed its own people - never mind earn hard currency on the global market.


The flower vases in New York may well have Colombian flowers in them, and the noses on Wall Street may well have Colombian cocaine up them - but the proceeds don't reach the Colombian people - unless FARC manages to put a tax on them.

Yes, we know all about Colombia's tourist industry,


And yes, you are wasting your time - if you expect me to agree with you that when any nation has a small elite and middle class doing quite well for itself - then the hungry majority can go to hell.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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The Columbian Régime is also very ungrateful. Chavez and Maduro put a lot of time, money and effort into the Colombian Peace Process. It couldn't have happened without them. Personally, I think they were misguided. They should have given guns and money to FARC and encouraged them to take the war to the Régime and liberate Colombia from this horrible, racist, Oligarchy.
 

George Dillon

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The Columbian Régime is also very ungrateful. Chavez and Maduro put a lot of time, money and effort into the Colombian Peace Process. It couldn't have happened without them. Personally, I think they were misguided. They should have given guns and money to FARC and encouraged them to take the war to the Régime and liberate Colombia from this horrible, racist, Oligarchy.


Now I see your ignorance tap is in full flow.

FARC's "war" (mostly peasants were killed) never succeeded in "liberating" a town the size of Kinnegad. It was almost entirely out in the boonies, scores of miles from urban centres. And when they asked for a retrospective mandate from the people in an election, the people told them to Eff Off.
The people know far more about FARC cruelty than you-or I--will ever know. They hate the FARC. I have never met even a sneaking regarder.

Though I do agree with you about the Peace Process (sic). Santos threw away all the progress that Uribe had made. The FARC were on the ropes when unfortunately Uribe was constitutionally barred from seeking a third term. Santos was a disaster, gave away the store. Colombia is still paying for his legacy (increased taxation to pay for FARC hotel sprees in Havana, for example).
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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Now I see your ignorance tap is in full flow.

FARC's "war" (mostly peasants were killed) never succeeded in "liberating" a town the size of Kinnegad. It was almost entirely out in the boonies, scores of miles from urban centres. And when they asked for a retrospective mandate from the people in an election, the people told them to Eff Off.
The people know far more about FARC cruelty than you-or I--will ever know. They hate the FARC. I have never met even a sneaking regarder.

Though I do agree with you about the Peace Process (sic). Santos threw away all the progress that Uribe had made. The FARC were on the ropes when unfortunately Uribe was constitutionally barred from seeking a third term. Santos was a disaster, gave away the store. Colombia is still paying for his legacy (increased taxation to pay for FARC hotel sprees in Havana, for example).

Nonsense. FARC and ELN couldn't be defeated because they have popular support. Just as the Provisional IRA had in Ireland. They may not vote for them, but they will give them a safe house or keep a secret. Colombia under FARC and the ELN would be a better place. Father Camilo Torres was the greatest Colombian who ever lived. He was a Saint and a Patriot, who gave everything for the people. Those who opposed him are a vile and savage Oligarchy, who cannibalize the Colombian people. I have no doubt that the future government of Colombia will come from the ranks of FARC and the ELN. Then Colombia will enjoy happiness and freedom.
 

Dan Óg

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Well you didn’t vote for him anyway Timmy.

You need to study the Irish electoral system Tim and stop throwing out red herrings.

And you needn’t come back with a load of bull either, fake news Timmy, get real mate, stop living in cloud cuckoo land.
I am now going to use the plural Timmys because he is here ranting about Castro, Stalin, Hitler, Mugaby, Fatgit and Medusa 27 hours each day. They are living about 80 years in the past
 
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