The Teutonic Order - The Lords in White Capes

Tadhg Gaelach

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Threads
1,222
Messages
31,160
Likes
29,660
#1


Another splendid body of men defending Christendom from the Muhommadan Horde. They were founded in 1190 in the Christian Kingdom of Jerusalem to defend German pilgrims to the Holy Land. They were known for their fearsome battle dress, iron discipline and ferocious bravery on the field of slaughter. Like the Templars, they wore a white tunic, but with a black cross. Later on, their ferocity was unleashed on the pagans of the Baltics, where they seem to have overstepped their orders from the Pope. To this day, there is still a folk suspicion of Christianity in the Baltic area going back to this time. The great hero of the Jews, Napoleon Bonaparte, ordered their dissolution in 1809 and confiscated much of their land, however they continued to exist as a religious Catholic organization. Ironically, Hitler also banned them, but they survived him too and still exist to this very day.

 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Threads
1,222
Messages
31,160
Likes
29,660
#3
The Battle of Grunewald, 1410, was the beginning of the end for the Order. In Medieval Europe, they were simply known as "the Order."

 
OP
OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Threads
1,222
Messages
31,160
Likes
29,660
#4
Here they are looking super badass in this Soviet film from the 1940s - with a great soundtrack. Russian Prince Alexander Nevsky fought them in this spectacular battle on the ice.

 

jmcc

PI Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2015
Threads
6
Messages
2,143
Likes
1,187
#6
The artwork in the OP is rather mad. The helmet is a major risk to the wearer as one twist on those horns and the wearer's neck is broken. The armour looks like something out of American Football in that it impedes movement. If you look at old suits of armor and mail, they are all about distributed weight and protection. The wearer can move quickly and easily. There was a theory in the 19th and 20th centuries about knights being unable to mount a horse without helpers and some kind of crane mechanism. However, on the autopsies of knights and soldiers, the interesting thing is that most of them were like rugby players and were slightly taller than average due to having a better diet. The weight of the armour was distributed and was relatively easy to move about in and those guys used to train for hours each day.
 
OP
OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Threads
1,222
Messages
31,160
Likes
29,660
#7
The artwork in the OP is rather mad. The helmet is a major risk to the wearer as one twist on those horns and the wearer's neck is broken. The armour looks like something out of American Football in that it impedes movement. If you look at old suits of armor and mail, they are all about distributed weight and protection. The wearer can move quickly and easily. There was a theory in the 19th and 20th centuries about knights being unable to mount a horse without helpers and some kind of crane mechanism. However, on the autopsies of knights and soldiers, the interesting thing is that most of them were like rugby players and were slightly taller than average due to having a better diet. The weight of the armour was distributed and was relatively easy to move about in and those guys used to train for hours each day.
That particular head dress is used for the Teutonic Order in a lot of art, so it may well be authentic. Horns on helmets go back a long way. These pics look more realistic.

 

jon 1000's of irish f

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Threads
1
Messages
1,762
Likes
1,198
#8
The artwork in the OP is rather mad. The helmet is a major risk to the wearer as one twist on those horns and the wearer's neck is broken. The armour looks like something out of American Football in that it impedes movement. If you look at old suits of armor and mail, they are all about distributed weight and protection. The wearer can move quickly and easily. There was a theory in the 19th and 20th centuries about knights being unable to mount a horse without helpers and some kind of crane mechanism. However, on the autopsies of knights and soldiers, the interesting thing is that most of them were like rugby players and were slightly taller than average due to having a better diet. The weight of the armour was distributed and was relatively easy to move about in and those guys used to train for hours each day.
most of the early crusaders where vikings from Normandy. from what i can gather. hence the horns! still there is plenty of viking descendant blood still left in the eu and ireland!
 

jmcc

PI Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2015
Threads
6
Messages
2,143
Likes
1,187
#9
That particular head dress is used for the Teutonic Order in a lot of art, so it may well be authentic. Horns on helmets go back a long way. These pics look more realistic.

Not with the horns. The lower set of helmets are more realistic. The thing about horns on a helmet is that they provide a bigger target for an attacker and hitting them can give the wearer a concussion or, worse, break his neck. They may look nice and scary to people with only a fantasy knowledge of history but the whole thing about helmets in combat is that they make combat more survivable and offer protection to the wearer. Armor tends to be brutally efficient and what does not work gets dropped because the people wearing it get killed. There are also decorative helmets and armour for special occasions but they would not generally get used in combat.
 

jmcc

PI Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2015
Threads
6
Messages
2,143
Likes
1,187
#10
most of the early crusaders where vikings from Normandy. from what i can gather. hence the horns! still there is plenty of viking descendant blood still left in the eu and ireland!
Vikings with horned helmets is a bit of a stereotype. :) There's a great pisstake of the Vikings series on Netflix (Norsemen) where they deal with the horns on helmets. From archeological records, the Viking helmets and later Norman helmets were very similar. The horns seem to be missing on most of them. :)
 

jon 1000's of irish f

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Threads
1
Messages
1,762
Likes
1,198
#11
Vikings with horned helmets is a bit of a stereotype. :) There's a great pisstake of the Vikings series on Netflix (Norsemen) where they deal with the horns on helmets. From archeological records, the Viking helmets and later Norman helmets were very similar. The horns seem to be missing on most of them. :)
that's because the vikings are the normans!
 
OP
OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

Donator
Premium Account
PI Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Threads
1,222
Messages
31,160
Likes
29,660
#12
Not with the horns. The lower set of helmets are more realistic. The thing about horns on a helmet is that they provide a bigger target for an attacker and hitting them can give the wearer a concussion or, worse, break his neck. They may look nice and scary to people with only a fantasy knowledge of history but the whole thing about helmets in combat is that they make combat more survivable and offer protection to the wearer. Armor tends to be brutally efficient and what does not work gets dropped because the people wearing it get killed. There are also decorative helmets and armour for special occasions but they would not generally get used in combat.

Yes, that's all true from a practical perspective, but you have to bear in mind that there is also the element of making yourself look huge and frightening to the enemy - and convincing yourself and your own troops that you are invincible. Maybe the ones wearing those very elaborate headdresses where the top officers who weren't actually going into combat, I don't know, but from looking around the internet - that horned helmet does seem to be authentic. This is a Celtic bird helmet found in Romania from about the 4th Century B.C. You can hardly imagine fighting in this, but it would be an inspiring sight for your own troops as you rallied them to the fight.

 
Top Bottom