The Summer Walkers - An Luchd Siubhail

Earnán Ó Maille

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Traveler Lady - 4.00 mins: 'The real tinkers far back, after the Battle of Culloden (1746), and after Glencoe (Massacre, 1692), they fled to the lowlands, and they start living in dugouts and in caves, McPhee, Stuarts, Mclains, McKenzies, the remnants of the Clans.'

Indigenous Highland Travellers

In Scottish Gaelic they are known as the "Ceàrdannan" ("the Craftsmen"), or less controversially, "luchd siubhail" (people of travel) for travellers in general. Poetically known as the "Summer Walkers", Highland Travellers are a distinct ethnic group and may be referred to as "traivellers", "traivellin fowk'", in Scots, "tinkers", originating from the Gaelic "tinceard" or (tinsmith) or "Black Tinkers". Mistakenly the settled Scottish population may call all travelling and Romani groups tinkers, which is usually regarded as pejorative, and contemptuously as "tinks" or "tinkies".

Highland Travellers are closely tied to the native Highlands, and many traveller families carry clan names like Macfie, Stewart, MacDonald, Cameron, Williamson and Macmillan. They follow a nomadic or settled lifestyle; passing from village to village and are more strongly identified with the native Gaelic speaking population. Continuing their nomadic life, they would pitch their bow-tents on rough ground on the edge of the village and earn money there as tinsmiths, hawkers, horse dealers or pearl-fishermen. Many found seasonal employment on farms, e.g. at the berry picking or during harvest. Since the 1950s, however, the majority of Highland Travellers have settled down into organized campsites or regular houses.



Scottish Traveler camp

Language

The Highland Travellers' speech includes an acrolect called 'Beurla-reagaird'. It is related to the Irish Traveller Shelta as a creol of the Goidelic language group. It was used as a cultural identifier, just as Roma used the Romani language. However like the Highland Travellers themselves the language is unrelated to the Romani languages.

It is estimated that only 2,000 Scottish travellers continue to lead their traditional lifestyle on the roads.

Scottish Gypsy and Traveller groups - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Beurla-reagaird is called Béarla na Saor in Irish, and it means the "speech of the smiths."
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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This is why its ridiculous to suggest that the Travellers are an ethnic group separate to the native Gaelic population. They are more Gaelic than anyone.
 

Earnán Ó Maille

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This is why its ridiculous to suggest that the Travellers are an ethnic group separate to the native Gaelic population. They are more Gaelic than anyone.
The wikipedia entry is incorrect, with regard to the figure of 2,000 Gaelic Scottish Travelers still 'on the road'. The last journey through the old traditional camping grounds took place in 1978. Within a few years, the last of them who were born on the road will have passed on.
 
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