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The Sinking of The MS Estonia Ferry 1994 (24th anniversary)

johnhan279

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Zero Hour - The Sinking of The MS Estonia Ferry 720p HD (Discovery)

24 anniversary

The Baltic Sea claimed 852 people's lives by drowning and freezing them to death in the 8 degree C cold water. Only 95 bodies were ever recovered. The wreck of the Estonia was not salvaged, but sealed, covered in sand and declared an official burial ground. The 150 metre long Estonia left the Estonian capital Tallin and sailed into a raging Baltic Sea. Unlike the other car ferries on the route, the Estonia ran at full speed into waves more than 15 meters tall. Six hours into the voyage, she sank to a depth of more than 75 metres. The first sign of danger was the sound of metal scraping against metal. The sound was caused by the weakly constructed locks on the bow visor breaking under the strain of the waves. The visor eventually broke off of the ship, uncovering the opening to the car deck behind. Water rushed in and destabilised the ship, starting a catastrophic chain of events that brought the ship down. Without warning, the vessel lurched some 20 degrees to starboard, and would continue to tilt to 90 degrees. Passengers were in danger of getting crushed under falling equipment. At such an angle, it was all but impossible to move around. Those who were going to survive had already reached the deck. Tragically, by then most of the lifeboats could not be released due to sideways tilt of the ship. Soon, the ferry slipped beneath the waves into a watery grave.

 
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The area around the wreck of the Estonia remains a no-go even to this day.

I've sailed into Tallin many times and am a frequent passenger on the many cruise lines which operate across the Old Hansa region. On several occasions, I've found myself up on the top decks for a smoke and the views and have witnessed families throwing flowers off the deck into the freezing waters below. The legacy of the Estonia is still spoken of in hushed and reverential tones.

On the whole though, the cruise lines all over the Baltic are fantasitcally popular and are in many ways a rite of passage for the youth. Because the cruises are so affordable and the conditions so nice, that for many a weekend cruise once a month to Tallin, Stockholm, Helsinki, Saint Petersburgh, Riga, and Vilnius remain vibrant.

In fact, quite a bit more than vibrant.

The party never ends, to be honest. All through the year, no matter the season or temperatures, Nordic people love to cruise, to visit their old Hansa partner cities, and basically have a rocking time of it. I recommend a cruise on The Marjella by Viking Line. Cheap and cheerful, it's like a contained mental asylum on the water.

Party central.
 
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johnhan279

johnhan279

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I recommend reading the following article from The Atlantic by William Langewiesche : A Sea Story. It's one of the most gripping and haunting things I've ever read. Here is an extract to give you an idea :

Survival that night was a very tight race, and savagely simple. People who started early and moved fast had some chance of winning. People who started late or hesitated for any reason had no chance at all. Action paid. Contemplation did not. The mere act of getting dressed was enough to condemn people to death, and although many of those who escaped to the water succumbed to the cold, most of the ultimate winners endured the ordeal completely naked or in their underwear. The survivors all seem to have grasped the nature of this race, the first stage of which involved getting outside to the Deck 7 promenade without delay. There was no God to turn to for mercy. There was no government to provide order. Civilization was ancient history​
 

OrderoftheDragon

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I recommend reading the following article from The Atlantic by William Langewiesche : A Sea Story. It's one of the most gripping and haunting things I've ever read. Here is an extract to give you an idea :

Survival that night was a very tight race, and savagely simple. People who started early and moved fast had some chance of winning. People who started late or hesitated for any reason had no chance at all. Action paid. Contemplation did not. The mere act of getting dressed was enough to condemn people to death, and although many of those who escaped to the water succumbed to the cold, most of the ultimate winners endured the ordeal completely naked or in their underwear. The survivors all seem to have grasped the nature of this race, the first stage of which involved getting outside to the Deck 7 promenade without delay. There was no God to turn to for mercy. There was no government to provide order. Civilization was ancient history​
You really have to take your own life in your hands in these major disasters, waiting for others to tell you want to do never ends well.

Titanic, Costa Concordia, Twin Towers, Grenfell many people die in major disasters after surviving the initial event by not making decisions quickly enough and waiting for others to tell them what to do, sometimes even the advice given is deadly.
 
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