The Marxist View of Patriotism and Nationalism

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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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Was there not some overlap between Fascism & Syndicalism, though?

Well, Mussolini was first a Marxist Syndicalist and then a Fascist. There's a very big overlap, I'd say. Both are predicated on a communal interpretation of the world, whereas Liberalism explains the world on the basis of atomized individuals.
 

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Well, Mussolini was first a Marxist Syndicalist and then a Fascist. There's a very big overlap, I'd say. Both are predicated on a communal interpretation of the world, whereas Liberalism explains the world on the basis of atomized individuals.
Could you almost say Italian Fascism was an amalgamation of Capitalism, Syndicalism & d'Annunzian "Politica di Bellezza"?
 
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Could you almost say Italian Fascism was an amalgamation of Capitalism, Syndicalism & d'Annunzian "Politica di Bellezza"?

Yes, it was a sort of Third Way. Something between Capitalism and Socialism. D'Annunzio hated Capitalism as well - as would anyone with a noble disposition.
 

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Yes, it was a sort of Third Way. Something between Capitalism and Socialism. D'Annunzio hated Capitalism as well - as would anyone with a noble disposition.
He said something about Nationalism & Syndicalism being the only aristocratic forces in Europe at the time. Strange guy.
 
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How would you explain the influence of Bonaparte on d'Annunzio? Nationalism?
I wouldn't be able to give you a very considered answer to that question a chara, only that Fascism does tend to center of the Great Man rather too much. Marx addresses this question in this text, where he says:

But unheroic though bourgeois society is, it nevertheless needed heroism, sacrifice, terror, civil war, and national wars to bring it into being. And in the austere classical traditions of the Roman Republic the bourgeois gladiators found the ideals and the artforms, the self-deceptions, that they needed to conceal from themselves the bourgeois-limited content of their struggles and to keep their passion on the high plane of great historic tragedy.

 
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Aesthetician

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I wouldn't be able to give you a very considered answer to that question a chara, only that Fascism does tend to center of the Great Man rather too much. Marx addresses this question in this text, where he says:

But unheroic though bourgeois society is, it nevertheless needed heroism, sacrifice, terror, civilwar, and national wars to bring it into being. And in the austere classical traditions of the Roman Republic the bourgeois gladiators found the ideals and the artforms, the self-deceptions, that they needed to conceal from themselves the bourgeois-limited content of their struggles and to keep their passion on the high plane of great historic tragedy.

But if you are implying that d'Annunzio was somehow limited by bourgeois concepts, I am not sure I can really agree with that.
 
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But if you are implying that d'Annunzio was somehow limited by bourgeois concepts, I am not sure I can really agree with that.

I don't know very much about d'Annunzio at all. I'm really just saying that Fascism is limited by bourgeois aesthetics. So is Marxism to a great extent, but it has been deburgeoisified to some extent in Asia and Latin America, where the Native aesthetic has a powerful influence.
 

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I don't know very much about d'Annunzio at all. I'm really just saying that Fascism is limited by bourgeois aesthetics. So is Marxism to a great extent, but it has been deburgeoisified to some extent in Asia and Latin America, where the Native aesthetic has a powerful influence.
The Fasces are a Roman symbol; If Roman aesthetic is bourgeois, then bourgeois aesthetic is just fine. Futurism is neither a bourgeois aesthetic; It is radical. "Politica di Bellezza" is an aesthetic & politic philosophy in which the aesthetic & politic are indistinguishable & in which both the old & new worlds are brought together.
 
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The Fasces are a Roman symbol; If Roman aesthetic is bourgeois, then bourgeois aesthetic is just fine. Futurism is neither a bourgeois aesthetic; It is radical. "Politica di Bellezza" is an aesthetic & politic philosophy in which the aesthetic & politic are indistinguishable & in which both the old & new worlds are brought together.
Well, the Roman aesthetic certainly wasn't bourgeois, but 20th Century Fascists tended to adopt a bourgeois version of the Roman aesthetic. I would say that Futurism is bourgeois - hyperbourgeois even.
 
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