The future of Ireland - What are the key issues for a future government and how to tackle them?

Antonon

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#1
As Ireland moves onwards through the 21st century we meet new challenges and set new targets not just for the population but for each government that comes after the last.

There are many things that Ireland must strive towards but with every leap forward there is always a leap back, we must tackle each step with planned ideas and set ourselves targets and goal. With this in mind, I invite you each member of this site to tell me what you believe are the key issues for any future government and how we would go about trying to tackle them.

Personally, my key issues are these;

  1. Immigration. It is shown that the population of Ireland is set to grow by a further 1 million by 2040, immigration will play an important part in this growth. As a nation, we need to decide how we integrate these new citizens. Do we force our own cultural values and ideas upon them or do we allow their own cultural diversity to take precedence over our own?
  2. Infrastructure, as the population of Ireland, grows can our infrastructure take any extra growth? Do we need more schools, hospitals, bigger towns with better roads and ports?
  3. Water. We have on numerous occasions tried to introduce water charges without success. This summer has shown that our water infrastructure is outdated and no good for the purpose. The government alone are unable to fix the pipes so what do we do? We must have a good adequate supply of water and we need to replace the old system in place.
  4. The European Union. With the UK leaving the EU we will be ultimately forced to eventually evaluate our own place in this institution, will the EU even exist in a decade from now?
  5. Northern Ireland. Brexit has put the unification of Ireland and Northern Ireland back into the spotlight, will we see in our own lifetimes the North and South United as one? How would this economically affect each part of this Island?
 

BURNOUT

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#2
The first thing to do is cull all the backroom boys who are making and advising the ministers, because until this mindset is put down we will continue with the blinkered visionless well paid TD's who seem to be unable to achieve anything. Just look back on what has been let happen in Ireland over the past few decades, and the cost of those badly made decisions on people today. Remember Enda and his looking forward to bringing home the 75,000 Irish from abroad, without a clue about how they would be treated when they came home to a country of red tape, no houses, poor broadband, one of the highest energy prices in Europe, crazy car insurance and no proper health service. No one seems able to plan anything long term here or even begin to see the consequences of their incompetence and inaction.
 
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#4
The economy, which in turn leads to health, housing and education. The economy needs to be seen as a vital servant of social good, and not just a good in and of itself.

Some degree of future-proofing against the next crash.

Enhanced cooperation with the rest of the EU post Brexit, along with a recognition that immigration from the UK may be the biggest source of population growth.

Greater secularisation, with religion removed as much as possible from the public sphere to take its rightful role as a private matter for the private individual. This also goes back tot he education system, but also further reform of Bunreacht.

Finding the right balance between privacy and the digital world, with the emphasis on the right to privacy.

And, within a decade or so, a border poll.
 
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#5
Unless immigration is tackled, we will eventually either have to increase borrowing immensely to keep even the poor level of services we have now, or raise taxes and cut public services even further to continue paying to import people who add naught to the economy.

Our relationship with the EU will change dramatically when they overrule our corporate tax regime, with the resultant exodus of multinationals to France, and the resultant job losses and shutdown of ancillary domestic companies. The current theatrical horror expressed by the media and politicians at the mere mention of any reevaluation of our relationship with the EU will change sharpish when the tax take to pay for their high life falls off a cliff. I do suspect however, that when this happens, the EU will find a way to bribe our political class to continue to support our membership - possibly by guaranteeing TD salaries.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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#6
Unless immigration is tackled, we will eventually either have to increase borrowing immensely to keep even the poor level of services we have now, or raise taxes and cut public services even further to continue paying to import people who add naught to the economy.

Our relationship with the EU will change dramatically when they overrule our corporate tax regime, with the resultant exodus of multinationals to France, and the resultant job losses and shutdown of ancillary domestic companies. The current theatrical horror expressed by the media and politicians at the mere mention of any reevaluation of our relationship with the EU will change sharpish when the tax take to pay for their high life falls off a cliff. I do suspect however, that when this happens, the EU will find a way to bribe our political class to continue to support our membership - possibly by guaranteeing TD salaries.

Immigration is tiny in this country.

With current figures showingit being 3-4K p.a. Net. And this is the first time we showed net.immigration since 2009. We are a nation of emigrants.
 
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#7
Immigration is tiny in this country.with at best it being 3-4K p.a.
What????

The official CSO figure is 84,600 for the 12 months to April 2017, and the official figures for Ireland, as for all EU countries, is well under the true figure.

*EDIT* I see you quoted the net figure - you are still hilariously off - the official CSO net figure for the same period is 19,800, which, again, is well off the true figure.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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#9
What????

The official CSO figure is 84,600 for the 12 months to April 2017, and the official figures for Ireland, as for all EU countries, is well under the true figure.

*EDIT* I see you quoted the net figure - you are still hilariously off - the official CSO net figure for the same period is 19,800, which, again, is well off the true figure.
You do understand the expression "net." ? Oh! I see you do. A tiny figure.
 
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