The forgotten child victims of the British Occupation of Ireland

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#1
The Forgotten Child Victims Of British Occupation

''The tragic deaths of two children, killed by a Provisional bomb in Warringtopn in March 1993, hit the world headlines, simply because of the power of the British media networks. Every Republican mourned their deaths, but many felt angry because the-powers-that-be, as formerly, remained highly selective in their condemnations. When Warrington occured we witnessed what amounted to political amnesia which was a studied insult to the intelligence of the ordinary people of the occupied zone. Those who felt such most intensely included scores of families who witnessed their children being killed by the British so-called 'security forces'. What follows is a reminder and a memorial to their memory. This research topic is ongoing and is therefore currently incomplete, yet worthy of publication as it is at an advanced stage.''- Saoirse April 1994

14 August 1969 - Patrick Rooney (9) - Shot dead by the RUC Belfast
06 April 1970 - Francis McGuigan (2) - Killed by Asphyxiated CS Gas fired by British troops in Ballymurphy Belfast
27 June 1970 - Carol Ann McCool (3) - Killed in premature explosion in Derry
27 June 1970 - Bernadette McCool (9) - Killed in premature explosion in Derry
08 February 1971 - Denise Ann Dickson (5) - Killed by British army in Belfast
00 February 1971 - Angela Gallagher (17 months) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
00 February 1971 - Desmond Healy (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
00 February 1971 - James McCallum (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
24 July 1971 - Damien Harkin (6) - Killed by British army in Derry
09 August 1971 - Leo McGuigan (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
06 September 1971 - Annette McGavigan (14) - Shot by British army in Derry
04 December 1971 - Marie McGurk (13) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
04 December 1971 - James Cromie (13) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
11 December 1971 - Tracey Munn (1) - Killed by a bomb in Belfast
11 December 1971 - Colin Nicholl (7 months) - Killed by a bomb in Belfast
14 December 1971 - Martin McShane (15) - Killed by the British army in Coalisland
07 January 1972 - Shaun O'Riordan (14) - Shot by British army in Belfast
19 February 1972 - David McAuley (13) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
01 March 1972 - Michael Connors (14) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
20 April 1972 - Francis Rowntree (11) - Shot by British army in Belfast
29 April 1972 - Rosaleen Gavin (8) - Shot by British army in Belfast
11 May 1972 - Joan Scott (12) - Killed in a gun battle involving the British army and the UDA
14 May 1972 - Michael McGee (16) - Shot by the UDA in Belfast
19 May 1972 - Manus Deery (15) - Shot by the British army in Derry
09 July 1972 - John Dougal (15) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
12 July 1972 - David McCleneghan (15) - Shot by the UVF in Belfast (He had a mental age of 7 and the UVF gang raped his mother, as he was forced to watch, and the mother was then shot, but survived)
14 July 1972 - Harold Morris (14) - Shot by the UDA in Belfast
16 July 1972 - Tobias Molloy (15) - Shot by the British army in Strabane
19 July 1972 - Alan Jack (5 months) - Killed in bomb explosion in Strabane
21 July 1972 - Stephen Parker (14) - Killed by IRA bomb in Belfast
31 July 1972 - Catherine Eakin (9) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - Joseph Connolly (16) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - William Temple (16) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - Daniel Hegarty (16) - Shot by British army in Derry
22 September 1972 - Daniel Rooney (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
07 October 1972 - Alec Moorehead (15) - Shot by UDR in Newtownstewart
14 October 1972 - Michael Turner (15) - Shot by MRF in Belfast
15 October 1972 - William Doherty (4) - Shot by British army in Belfast
00 October 1972 - William Warnock (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
31 October 1972 - Paula Strong (6) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
31 October 1972 - Claire Hughes (4) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
27 November 1972 - Rory Gormley (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
16 December 1972 - James Reynolds (16) - Shot by UVF in Belfast
27 December 1972 - Eugene Devlin (15) - Shot by British army in Strabane
30 December 1972 - Bernard Fox (16) - Shot by British army in Belfast
29 January 1973 - Petter Watterson (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
30 January 1973 - Philip Rafferty (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
27 February 1973 - Kevin Healy (13) - Shot by British army in Newry
23 March 1973 - Sean O'Riordan (13) - Shot by British army in Belfast
19 April 1973 - Anthony McDowell (12) - Shot by British army in Belfast
17 May 1973 - Eileen Mackin (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
16 June 1973 - Daniel Rouse (15) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
09 August 1973 - Paul Crummey (4) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
14 August 1973 - Henry Cunningham (16) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
08 September 1973 - Brian McDermott (10) - (His body was found in a river after he had been reported missing for several days. He had been sexually assaulted and tortured by his killer, alleged to have been John McKeague*(1). The killing, which involved dismemberment and the burning of the body in the Ormeau Park, was so gruesome that the local press speculated that it might have been carried out as part of a Satanic ritual.)
14 November 1973 – Kathleen Feeney (15) – Shot during IRA attack on British army in Derry
29 May 1974 – Michelle Osborne (13) – Killed by a UVF bomb at Hannahstown outside Belfast
11 July 1974 – Michael Browne (16) – Shot by the UVF in Belfast
12 July 1974 – Barbara Leatham (8) – Beaten to death by Loyalists in Lurgan
29 April 1975 – Anthony Meli (10) – Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
17 July 1975 – Ciaran Irvine (16) – Shot by a ‘nervous’ British soldier, after the car in which the youth was travelling ‘backfired’ as an army foot patrol was passing in Belfast
06 August 1975 - Siobhan McCabe (4) – Shot by British troops in Andersontown Belfast
07 August 1975 – Patrick Crawford (15) - Shot by British troops in Andersontown Belfast
28 August 1975 – Stephen Geddis (10) – Victim of a rubber bullet fired by the British army in Belfast
10 August 1976 – Andrew Maguire (6 weeks) – Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
10 August 1976 – John Maguire (2) - Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
10 August 1976 – Joanne Maguire (8) - Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
14 August 1976 – Majella O’Hare (12) – Shot by the British army in Whitecross
27 August 1976 – Brigeen Dempsey (10 months) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
10 October 1976 – Brian Stewart (13) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
11 October 1976 - Anne Magee (15) – Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
09 November 1976 – Cornelius McCrory (16) – Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
10 November 1976 – Carol McMenamy (14) - Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
24 December 1976 – Geraldine McKeown (14) - Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
24 October 1977 – Michael Neill (16) – Shot by British army in Belfast
16 November 1977 – Marcia Gregg (15) – Killed when Loyalists burned her home in Ligoniel Belfast
00 February 1978 – Michael Scott (10) – Killed alongside his grandmother by a Loyalist bomb at their home in Belfast
09 April 1978 – Kevin MvMenamin (10) – Killed by a Shankill Butchers bomb in Belfast
11 July 1978 – John Boyle (15) – Shot dead by the SAS in Antrim
01 October 1978 – Grahame Lewis (13) – Protestant who was accidentally shot when playing with his father’s legally-held gun in Belfast
09 October 1978 – Denis Neill (16) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
01 January 1980 – Doreen McGuinness (16) Shot by the British army in Belfast
31 March 1980 – Paul Moran (15) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
23 July 1980 – Michael McCartan (15) – Shot by the RUC when he was painting a slogan on a wall in Belfast
15 April 1981 – Paul Whitters (15) – Shot by the British army in Derry
07 May 1981 – Desmond Guiney (14) - Killed during a riot in Belfast
12 May 1981 – Julie Livingstone (13) – Killed by the British army in Belfast
22 May 1981 – Carol Ann Kelly (12) - Killed by the British army in Belfast
08 July 1981 – John Dempsey (16) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
09 July 1981 – Daniel Barrett (15) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
11 April 1982 – Stephen McConomy (11) – Shot by the RUC in Derry
06 July 1988 – David Hanna (6) – Killed by an IRA bomb in Armagh
24 July 1988 – Eamma Donnelly (14) – Killed during an IRA attack on Benburb RUC base
09 November 1991 – Colin Lundy (16) – Killed alongside his mother by a Loyalist petrol bomb in Belfast
05 February 1992 – James Kennedy (15) – Killed by the UFF/UDA in Belfast
23 October 1993 – Michelle Baird (7) - Killed by an IRA bomb in Belfast
23 October 1993 – Leanne Murray (13) - Killed by an IRA bomb in Belfast
05 December 1993 – Brian Duffy (15) – Shot by the UFF/UDA in Belfast

Notes

*(1) John McKeague is believed to have played a leading role in the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force in 1966, as well as being a member of numerous other Loyalist Paramilitary groups. In 1966 he joined Ian Paisley's Free Presbyterian Church, and in 1968 having moved to Belfast he then joined the Ulster Protestant Volunteers. Before coming to Belfast he had been questioned in relation to a sexual assault on two young boys although the charges were later dropped. In 1969 he helped to establish the Shankill Defence Association which later merged with the Ulster Defence Association, and then in 1972 he helped to establish the Red Hand Commandos. McKeague's relationship with William McGrath and Tara*(2) is also disputed. McGrath was later charged and convicted of the sexual abuse of kids at Kincora Boy’s Home.

According to Tim Pat Coogan McKeague was a founder member of Tara of 1966 although he does not elaborate on the details. Chris Moore, in his investigation into the Kincora scandal, insists that McKeague was never a member of Tara but that he and McGrath had met to discuss trading weapons between their two groups and that following these meetings McKeague had become a regular visitor to Kincora, where he was involved in several rapes of underage boys living at the home.

In 1971 he was tried for incitement to hatred after publishing the controversial Loyalist Song Book. The first man to be tried under the Incitement to Hatred Act, McKeague's book included the line "you've never seen a better Taig than with a bullet in his head". After the jury disagreed at his trial a retrial was ordered at which he and a co-defendant were acquitted. Martin Dillon in the Dirty War argues that it was around this time that Special Branch first recruited him as an agent, allegedly using information they had obtained about his paedophile activities to force him to agree, and that he was handed over to Military Intelligence by Special Branch the following year.

McKeague became a leading figure in the Ulster Loyalist Central Coordinating Committee (ULCCC), and in 1976 publicly endorsed Ulster nationalism in his capacity as an ULCCC spokesman. The aim of the group, which McKeague chaired, was to co-ordinate loyalist paramilitaries with the aim of founding a unified "Ulster army".

In January 1982 McKeague was interviewed by detectives investigating the Kincora Boy’s Home*(2) scandal about his involvement in the sexual abuse. Fearful of returning to prison McKeague told friends that he was prepared to name others involved in the paedophile ring to avoid a sentence. On 29 January 1982, McKeague was shot dead by the INLA.

*(2)Kincora Boys' Home

On 3 April 1980 three members of staff at the home, William McGrath, Raymond Semple and Joseph Mains, were charged with a number of offences relating to the systematic sexual abuse of children in their care over a number of years. All three were later convicted and jailed. Mains, the former warden, received a term of six years, Semple, a former assistant warden, five years and McGrath was jailed in December 1981 for four years.

Allegations were later made that the Royal Ulster Constabulary had been informed of the abuse at the home for years previously, but had not moved to prevent it. In his 1999 book The Dirty War, Martin Dillon claims that McGrath, who was also the leader of an obscure loyalist paramilitary group called Tara, may have been employed by MI5 since the 1960s and was being blackmailed into providing intelligence on other loyalist groups.

Ian Paisley, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party and moderator of the Free Presbyterian Church which he founded in 1951, was accused of failing to report the fact of McGrath's abuse to the relevant authorities although he initially denied ever being advised by his informant, a church member, Valerie Shaw, that it was taking place. McGrath was himself married with children. Paisley later gave other versions acknowledging learning from Shaw about McGrath's homosexuality.

During this time, it is alleged by current affairs magazine Private Eye, high-ranking members of the Whitehall Civil Service and senior officers of the British military were involved in the sexual abuse of boys in Kincora.

A "private inquiry" was set up in January 1982 by James Prior, the Northern Ireland Secretary of State, under the Commissioner of Complaints, Stephen McGonagle, to deal with these allegations. However it collapsed after three of its members resigned because they felt that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) had failed to carry out an effective investigation.

Joshua Cardwell, an east Belfast Unionist Party of Northern Ireland (UPNI) councillor and Stormont MP who formerly chaired the Belfast Corporation Welfare Committee responsible for children's' homes, died by suicide in 1982 after making a statement to the RUC in March over Kincora.
 

Northern Angel

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#3
Nothing to do with the British occupation but the hate of a group of people against their own people.

People have to accept that some of us are more than happy being British, I wish you well in the south but stop telling us in the North how we have to live.

Its time people just got on with their own lives.

RIP to those who have been slaughtered by so called Irish people.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#4
Nothing to do with the British occupation but the hate of a group of people against their own people.

People have to accept that some of us are more than happy being British, I wish you well in the south but stop telling us in the North how we have to live.

Its time people just got on with their own lives.

RIP to those who have been slaughtered by so called Irish people.

Delusional.
 

Dublin 4

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#5
Nothing to do with the British occupation but the hate of a group of people against their own people.

People have to accept that some of us are more than happy being British, I wish you well in the south but stop telling us in the North how we have to live.

Its time people just got on with their own lives.

RIP to those who have been slaughtered by so called Irish people.
Go back home- you weren't invited, oh that's right we don't have to actually tell you to go back home anymore, you're getting so outbred lol

Pity your Anti Irish Colleagues in Sinn Fein are giving you a bit of a Stay of Execution though.

You guys are such a joke I spend my time against the EU & Immigration.

You are long forgotten about, though I have to agree with you, a lot of SF are "Subhuman" & you all probably wouldn't be as angry if it wasn't for SF.

I've more time for a lot of Unionist Politicians than I have for the MI5/SF Gaystapo & a lot of you are decent people.

The English have you wrapped up at the back, they are long sick of the Ziomatrix UK, it's on borrowed time...
 

Dublin 4

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#6
The Forgotten Child Victims Of British Occupation

''The tragic deaths of two children, killed by a Provisional bomb in Warringtopn in March 1993, hit the world headlines, simply because of the power of the British media networks. Every Republican mourned their deaths, but many felt angry because the-powers-that-be, as formerly, remained highly selective in their condemnations. When Warrington occured we witnessed what amounted to political amnesia which was a studied insult to the intelligence of the ordinary people of the occupied zone. Those who felt such most intensely included scores of families who witnessed their children being killed by the British so-called 'security forces'. What follows is a reminder and a memorial to their memory. This research topic is ongoing and is therefore currently incomplete, yet worthy of publication as it is at an advanced stage.''- Saoirse April 1994

14 August 1969 - Patrick Rooney (9) - Shot dead by the RUC Belfast
06 April 1970 - Francis McGuigan (2) - Killed by Asphyxiated CS Gas fired by British troops in Ballymurphy Belfast
27 June 1970 - Carol Ann McCool (3) - Killed in premature explosion in Derry
27 June 1970 - Bernadette McCool (9) - Killed in premature explosion in Derry
08 February 1971 - Denise Ann Dickson (5) - Killed by British army in Belfast
00 February 1971 - Angela Gallagher (17 months) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
00 February 1971 - Desmond Healy (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
00 February 1971 - James McCallum (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
24 July 1971 - Damien Harkin (6) - Killed by British army in Derry
09 August 1971 - Leo McGuigan (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
06 September 1971 - Annette McGavigan (14) - Shot by British army in Derry
04 December 1971 - Marie McGurk (13) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
04 December 1971 - James Cromie (13) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
11 December 1971 - Tracey Munn (1) - Killed by a bomb in Belfast
11 December 1971 - Colin Nicholl (7 months) - Killed by a bomb in Belfast
14 December 1971 - Martin McShane (15) - Killed by the British army in Coalisland
07 January 1972 - Shaun O'Riordan (14) - Shot by British army in Belfast
19 February 1972 - David McAuley (13) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
01 March 1972 - Michael Connors (14) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
20 April 1972 - Francis Rowntree (11) - Shot by British army in Belfast
29 April 1972 - Rosaleen Gavin (8) - Shot by British army in Belfast
11 May 1972 - Joan Scott (12) - Killed in a gun battle involving the British army and the UDA
14 May 1972 - Michael McGee (16) - Shot by the UDA in Belfast
19 May 1972 - Manus Deery (15) - Shot by the British army in Derry
09 July 1972 - John Dougal (15) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
12 July 1972 - David McCleneghan (15) - Shot by the UVF in Belfast (He had a mental age of 7 and the UVF gang raped his mother, as he was forced to watch, and the mother was then shot, but survived)
14 July 1972 - Harold Morris (14) - Shot by the UDA in Belfast
16 July 1972 - Tobias Molloy (15) - Shot by the British army in Strabane
19 July 1972 - Alan Jack (5 months) - Killed in bomb explosion in Strabane
21 July 1972 - Stephen Parker (14) - Killed by IRA bomb in Belfast
31 July 1972 - Catherine Eakin (9) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - Joseph Connolly (16) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - William Temple (16) - Killed by IRA bomb in Claudy
31 July 1972 - Daniel Hegarty (16) - Shot by British army in Derry
22 September 1972 - Daniel Rooney (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
07 October 1972 - Alec Moorehead (15) - Shot by UDR in Newtownstewart
14 October 1972 - Michael Turner (15) - Shot by MRF in Belfast
15 October 1972 - William Doherty (4) - Shot by British army in Belfast
00 October 1972 - William Warnock (15) - Shot by British army in Belfast
31 October 1972 - Paula Strong (6) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
31 October 1972 - Claire Hughes (4) - Killed by MRF/UVF bomb in Belfast
27 November 1972 - Rory Gormley (14) - Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
16 December 1972 - James Reynolds (16) - Shot by UVF in Belfast
27 December 1972 - Eugene Devlin (15) - Shot by British army in Strabane
30 December 1972 - Bernard Fox (16) - Shot by British army in Belfast
29 January 1973 - Petter Watterson (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
30 January 1973 - Philip Rafferty (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
27 February 1973 - Kevin Healy (13) - Shot by British army in Newry
23 March 1973 - Sean O'Riordan (13) - Shot by British army in Belfast
19 April 1973 - Anthony McDowell (12) - Shot by British army in Belfast
17 May 1973 - Eileen Mackin (14) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
16 June 1973 - Daniel Rouse (15) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
09 August 1973 - Paul Crummey (4) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
14 August 1973 - Henry Cunningham (16) - Shot by British backed death squads in Belfast
08 September 1973 - Brian McDermott (10) - (His body was found in a river after he had been reported missing for several days. He had been sexually assaulted and tortured by his killer, alleged to have been John McKeague*(1). The killing, which involved dismemberment and the burning of the body in the Ormeau Park, was so gruesome that the local press speculated that it might have been carried out as part of a Satanic ritual.)
14 November 1973 – Kathleen Feeney (15) – Shot during IRA attack on British army in Derry
29 May 1974 – Michelle Osborne (13) – Killed by a UVF bomb at Hannahstown outside Belfast
11 July 1974 – Michael Browne (16) – Shot by the UVF in Belfast
12 July 1974 – Barbara Leatham (8) – Beaten to death by Loyalists in Lurgan
29 April 1975 – Anthony Meli (10) – Killed by UVF bomb in Belfast
17 July 1975 – Ciaran Irvine (16) – Shot by a ‘nervous’ British soldier, after the car in which the youth was travelling ‘backfired’ as an army foot patrol was passing in Belfast
06 August 1975 - Siobhan McCabe (4) – Shot by British troops in Andersontown Belfast
07 August 1975 – Patrick Crawford (15) - Shot by British troops in Andersontown Belfast
28 August 1975 – Stephen Geddis (10) – Victim of a rubber bullet fired by the British army in Belfast
10 August 1976 – Andrew Maguire (6 weeks) – Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
10 August 1976 – John Maguire (2) - Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
10 August 1976 – Joanne Maguire (8) - Occupant of a car riddled with bullets by the British army
14 August 1976 – Majella O’Hare (12) – Shot by the British army in Whitecross
27 August 1976 – Brigeen Dempsey (10 months) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
10 October 1976 – Brian Stewart (13) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
11 October 1976 - Anne Magee (15) – Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
09 November 1976 – Cornelius McCrory (16) – Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
10 November 1976 – Carol McMenamy (14) - Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
24 December 1976 – Geraldine McKeown (14) - Shot by UFF/UDA in Belfast
24 October 1977 – Michael Neill (16) – Shot by British army in Belfast
16 November 1977 – Marcia Gregg (15) – Killed when Loyalists burned her home in Ligoniel Belfast
00 February 1978 – Michael Scott (10) – Killed alongside his grandmother by a Loyalist bomb at their home in Belfast
09 April 1978 – Kevin MvMenamin (10) – Killed by a Shankill Butchers bomb in Belfast
11 July 1978 – John Boyle (15) – Shot dead by the SAS in Antrim
01 October 1978 – Grahame Lewis (13) – Protestant who was accidentally shot when playing with his father’s legally-held gun in Belfast
09 October 1978 – Denis Neill (16) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
01 January 1980 – Doreen McGuinness (16) Shot by the British army in Belfast
31 March 1980 – Paul Moran (15) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
23 July 1980 – Michael McCartan (15) – Shot by the RUC when he was painting a slogan on a wall in Belfast
15 April 1981 – Paul Whitters (15) – Shot by the British army in Derry
07 May 1981 – Desmond Guiney (14) - Killed during a riot in Belfast
12 May 1981 – Julie Livingstone (13) – Killed by the British army in Belfast
22 May 1981 – Carol Ann Kelly (12) - Killed by the British army in Belfast
08 July 1981 – John Dempsey (16) – Shot by the British army in Belfast
09 July 1981 – Daniel Barrett (15) - Shot by the British army in Belfast
11 April 1982 – Stephen McConomy (11) – Shot by the RUC in Derry
06 July 1988 – David Hanna (6) – Killed by an IRA bomb in Armagh
24 July 1988 – Eamma Donnelly (14) – Killed during an IRA attack on Benburb RUC base
09 November 1991 – Colin Lundy (16) – Killed alongside his mother by a Loyalist petrol bomb in Belfast
05 February 1992 – James Kennedy (15) – Killed by the UFF/UDA in Belfast
23 October 1993 – Michelle Baird (7) - Killed by an IRA bomb in Belfast
23 October 1993 – Leanne Murray (13) - Killed by an IRA bomb in Belfast
05 December 1993 – Brian Duffy (15) – Shot by the UFF/UDA in Belfast

Notes

*(1) John McKeague is believed to have played a leading role in the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force in 1966, as well as being a member of numerous other Loyalist Paramilitary groups. In 1966 he joined Ian Paisley's Free Presbyterian Church, and in 1968 having moved to Belfast he then joined the Ulster Protestant Volunteers. Before coming to Belfast he had been questioned in relation to a sexual assault on two young boys although the charges were later dropped. In 1969 he helped to establish the Shankill Defence Association which later merged with the Ulster Defence Association, and then in 1972 he helped to establish the Red Hand Commandos. McKeague's relationship with William McGrath and Tara*(2) is also disputed. McGrath was later charged and convicted of the sexual abuse of kids at Kincora Boy’s Home.

According to Tim Pat Coogan McKeague was a founder member of Tara of 1966 although he does not elaborate on the details. Chris Moore, in his investigation into the Kincora scandal, insists that McKeague was never a member of Tara but that he and McGrath had met to discuss trading weapons between their two groups and that following these meetings McKeague had become a regular visitor to Kincora, where he was involved in several rapes of underage boys living at the home.

In 1971 he was tried for incitement to hatred after publishing the controversial Loyalist Song Book. The first man to be tried under the Incitement to Hatred Act, McKeague's book included the line "you've never seen a better Taig than with a bullet in his head". After the jury disagreed at his trial a retrial was ordered at which he and a co-defendant were acquitted. Martin Dillon in the Dirty War argues that it was around this time that Special Branch first recruited him as an agent, allegedly using information they had obtained about his paedophile activities to force him to agree, and that he was handed over to Military Intelligence by Special Branch the following year.

McKeague became a leading figure in the Ulster Loyalist Central Coordinating Committee (ULCCC), and in 1976 publicly endorsed Ulster nationalism in his capacity as an ULCCC spokesman. The aim of the group, which McKeague chaired, was to co-ordinate loyalist paramilitaries with the aim of founding a unified "Ulster army".

In January 1982 McKeague was interviewed by detectives investigating the Kincora Boy’s Home*(2) scandal about his involvement in the sexual abuse. Fearful of returning to prison McKeague told friends that he was prepared to name others involved in the paedophile ring to avoid a sentence. On 29 January 1982, McKeague was shot dead by the INLA.

*(2)Kincora Boys' Home

On 3 April 1980 three members of staff at the home, William McGrath, Raymond Semple and Joseph Mains, were charged with a number of offences relating to the systematic sexual abuse of children in their care over a number of years. All three were later convicted and jailed. Mains, the former warden, received a term of six years, Semple, a former assistant warden, five years and McGrath was jailed in December 1981 for four years.

Allegations were later made that the Royal Ulster Constabulary had been informed of the abuse at the home for years previously, but had not moved to prevent it. In his 1999 book The Dirty War, Martin Dillon claims that McGrath, who was also the leader of an obscure loyalist paramilitary group called Tara, may have been employed by MI5 since the 1960s and was being blackmailed into providing intelligence on other loyalist groups.

Ian Paisley, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party and moderator of the Free Presbyterian Church which he founded in 1951, was accused of failing to report the fact of McGrath's abuse to the relevant authorities although he initially denied ever being advised by his informant, a church member, Valerie Shaw, that it was taking place. McGrath was himself married with children. Paisley later gave other versions acknowledging learning from Shaw about McGrath's homosexuality.

During this time, it is alleged by current affairs magazine Private Eye, high-ranking members of the Whitehall Civil Service and senior officers of the British military were involved in the sexual abuse of boys in Kincora.

A "private inquiry" was set up in January 1982 by James Prior, the Northern Ireland Secretary of State, under the Commissioner of Complaints, Stephen McGonagle, to deal with these allegations. However it collapsed after three of its members resigned because they felt that the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) had failed to carry out an effective investigation.

Joshua Cardwell, an east Belfast Unionist Party of Northern Ireland (UPNI) councillor and Stormont MP who formerly chaired the Belfast Corporation Welfare Committee responsible for children's' homes, died by suicide in 1982 after making a statement to the RUC in March over Kincora.

You are arguing against yourself. :p

You have forgotten & used the wrong '69.

It's 1169 not 1969. ;)


The behaviour of the Auxiliaries and the Black and Tans during the Irish War of Independence helped turn the Irish public against the Crown.

Some British politicians and the King made no secret of their horror at the behaviour of Crown forces.

The killings of men, women and children, both spectators and football players, made international headlines, damaging British credibility

Bloody Sunday (1920) - Wikipedia
 

Dublin 4

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16,361
#7
I hope the Children of today & tomorrow are spared the grief in the 6 that but that is just hope.

The path to Ireland winning a Border Poll is littered with Landmines, that said the Unionists are dying of & though elements of SF & individual Informers within SF are vile, the majority of the SF Grassroots Members are rational, giving & very decent people- even a few at the Top are too, the SDLP are more a case of harmless stuffed Shirts than bloodthirsty, "Post Nationalist" Uncle Toms they once were & many Loyalists have "Resistance Fatigue".

A huge amount of Nordies have no interest in Politics.

"The Good Friday Argument" 20 Years on Zzzzzzz
 
S

Séan2017

Non Registered Member
GUEST
#9
With their foreign flag draped over their bodies, men break into a family home and hold down the man while his wife and daughters are raped in front of him. One son remains hidden and watches his family as they are raped and murdered. He escapes. After placing his flag on the roof of his new house, one man moves his wife and child into the house and when their child grows up he lives in the house and gets married and has children and his children eventually end up living in the house. These current owners know how their family acquired the house in the first place but feel that it's not their concern and they should not have to leave nor take down their flag. The son who escaped has children of his own and his children have children and they are taught the history of their family through stories and song and education and they carry these memories and the pain within them. While the current British occupants fly the flag of inhuman crimes above a stolen home the sons and daughters of Irish victims are told that their new national flag now represents peace between the British and Irish. They are told to wear the tricolor and find peace while the British flag remains undiluted on the land of their ancesters. Should the British occupants of Ireland carry the debt of their ancesters? Are they responsible for crimes of the past. No. They are not. However, if they insist that their British flag of inhuman crimes should fly over stolen land and the law of their foreign country should prevail in Ireland, then they are condoning the actions of their ancesters and are in fact a foreign occupation on Irish soil. If they admit that they have no right to fly a British flag, the colours men wore when they raped and murdered inoccent people of Ireland, then it is only fair that a new democratic society be built which takes all views into consideration so that we can all live in peace and harmony. However, this governing will be under an Irish flag.

I dont even agree with the tricolour because it is not a national flag, it is a compromise with those who invaded Ireland. I think we should return the four flags of Ireland, one for each Provance. No British flag should ever fly in this country again for nine hundred years out of respect for those who died to protect their families and their neighbours. All people living on Irish soil deserve to be fairly represented in a democratic fashion under the Irish flag, san teanga Gaeilge. Slán. Séan.
 
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