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The definitive black music enriching white culture thread.

Dadaist

PI Member
Nov 1, 2015
391
84
Culture thrives when it is strong in itself, with a strong sense of itself. Then it can absorb external influences without slavishly aping them. And example of this is the way the Celts learned techniques of Greek sculpture - but they never aped Greek style. You will not see a single Celtic artwork that looks Greek - and yet, to the trained eye, the Greek technique may be apparent. Today, Irish culture is too weak and groundless to absorb any influence in a creative way. These days, Ireland just slavishly apes whatever is the latest fad in London or New York. We may throw a smattering of shamrocks over it and call it Irish, but it is a painful defeat to the discerning person.

I imagine when you were writing this thread you thought you would piss off the likes of me. But you don't piss me off at all. I am a lover of all the cultures of the world - as any regular reader of my posts will know. If I listen to a Japanese man play the Shakuhachi, and my soul is elevated by his art, does that mean that I have become Japanese and he has become Irish? Not at all. It means we both love art, and he, in his Japanese nature, gives the world something unique and very precious. To dilute or dissolve his Japanese nature into some Globalist pottage would be a crime against art and authentic human being.

Good god man you are such a narcissist.

You like music from around the world, so post some.
 
D

Deleted member 685

Non Registered Member
GUEST
Good god man you are such a narcissist.

You like music from around the world, so post some.


It not just a question of posting black music. The thread title specifies black music that enriched white culture - not speeded up its degradation and demise. I could post up music from brilliant musicians like Ali Farke Touré, or Tinariwen, but it's not clear that they had any influence on white culture at all. As I say, current white culture seems drawn to rubbish only, and ignores greatness.
 

FairstoodtheWind

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Oct 30, 2015
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It not just a question of posting black music. The thread title specifies black music that enriched white culture - not speeded up its degradation and demise. I could post up music from brilliant musicians like Ali Farke Touré, or Tinariwen, but it's not clear that they had any influence on white culture at all. As I say, current white culture seems drawn to rubbish only, and ignores greatness.


There is a fair bit of shite prevalent in the black culture too. Roc has cherry picked some fine examples of great tracks. But he could equally have thrown up, the probably even more "popular" music and videos which reflect just how far liberal capitalism and moral breakdown have penetrated that community too. I would also say that it comes back to another cultural group who control the financial success and promotion of black music these days, and who ensure that the worse elements, the stuff designed to reinforce that community breakdown, rises to the top.
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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Oct 30, 2015
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He sounds like he probably has his head screwed on. And if I were him I'd spank your bold little white nationalist back-side to see if it might put some sense in you.

Im not a white nationalist though. My da might be counted as a sort of one given that he refers to blacks and asians as wogs (not something you are likely to find myself doing). What you believe about Ashkenazi Jews he believes about Ulster Prods and Scottish Rangers supporters- personally I think you both of warped view of the world though while your psycho ethno-nationalism may have a bit more logical basis to it than his yours is globally more dangerous.
 
D

Deleted member 685

Non Registered Member
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There is a fair bit of shite prevalent in the black culture too. Roc has cherry picked some fine examples of great tracks. But he could equally have thrown up, the probably even more "popular" music and videos which reflect just how far liberal capitalism and moral breakdown have penetrated that community too. I would also say that it comes back to another cultural group who control the financial success and promotion of black music these day, and who ensure that the worse elements, the stuff designed to reinforce that community breakdown rises to the top.


Yes, that's what I'm saying. Black music is having a lot of influence on white culture today, but only the lowest forms of black music. Tragically, Europe is mentally dominated by the USA, and US culture loves only dumbness and crassness. It has an active hatred of everything that is noble and refined.
 

Dadaist

PI Member
Nov 1, 2015
391
84
It not just a question of posting black music. The thread title specifies black music that enriched white culture - not speeded up its degradation and demise. I could post up music from brilliant musicians like Ali Farke Touré, or Tinariwen, but it's not clear that they had any influence on white culture at all. As I say, current white culture seems drawn to rubbish only, and ignores greatness.

Music, I always find, is the great leveler. Good music can even bring greater understanding between a pinko like me and, how shall I put it, a man from your political neck of the woods.

I am a huge Touré and Tinariwen fan. Both of whom are hugely influenced by black American music, along with the wonderful World of West African music heritage. If you are interested here is an article I wrote on my former site about Tinariwen. One of the last great rock bands on this planet.

Most, if not all songs featured are on YouTube.


Screw No.179 ~ Tinariwen: Warrior
Poets

Posted on January 16, 2014 by Dadaist



Tinariwen (people of the desert) have been described as “the most rock’n’roll (band) of them all”.
Artists are not known for shying away from politics and the protest song was for decades a badge of
honour for many musicians. The difference with Tinariwen is that they are a little bit more
involved with their politics. The band formed in 1979, in a Touareg camp in Algeria. The Touareg
are a nomadic Berber people who have inhabited the Sahara desert for over a thousand years. Their
traditional lands, centred on Northern Mali, cross five West African countries whose national
borders were devised by some simple-minded colonial civil servants in the 19th century. Following
the collapse of French colonial rule in North Africa in the 1960’s, the Touareg people were seen as
racially inferior to Southern Malians and were brutally forced into the modern world by a new
Malian government trying to consolidate its power. The Touareg rebelled and were ruthlessly
scattered across North Africa to live mainly in desert camps for decades to come. Many of the
members of Tinariwen were born in these camps and in 1991 they hung up their guitars and picked up
their guns and went to war for their people’s independence. Legend has it that one band member used
to ride a horse into battle with his guitar strapped to his back and a Kalashnikov in his hand, and
is purported to have received 17 bullet wounds in his days as a
rebel.

Tinariwen ~ Imidiwaren (The Radio Tisdas Sessions)
Tinariwen ~ Tenhert (Imidiwaren)

Tinariwen’s music is at times haunting, at times hypnotic escapism, and with its often stripped
bare simplicity you can almost feel the vast expanse of the desert in the reverberation of the
guitars and the harmony of the vocals. The songs are sung in the Touareg dialect of Tamashek, in a
singing style called assouf, which is an expression of a deep nostalgia felt by most Touareg when
they are absent from their homeland. The vocals are backed by subtle percussion and anything up to
six electric guitars. Ibrahim Ag Alhabibe, one of the founding members with the distinctive almost
afro-like hair style, and the look of a traditional rock star, helped introduce the electric guitar
to Touareg music. He made his first guitar from a jerry can and some bicycle brake cable. His
playing style was influenced by Malian “desert blues” greats such as Boubacar Traoré.
He was first introduced to rock and reggae in the rebel camps, and it wasn’t long before he
hooked up some battery-powered amps and he and his friends performed around the campfires, and at
local weddings, with the initial intention of providing music for the people to escape from the
harsh realities of their daily existence.

Tinariwen ~ Amassakoul ‘N’Ténéré (Amassakoul)
Tinariwen ~ Tamatant Tilay (Aman Iman)

The band made rudimentary recordings on cassette tapes, and during the five-year long rebellion in
the 1990’s, with no telephone or postal system to carry information, their songs became
communiqués. The music carried messages on how to organize for independence and reputedly also
carried coded messages to help spread plans for action. In 2000, French band Lo’Jo witnessed
Tinariwen at The Festival In the Desert, which is essentially a traditional Touareg gathering with
modern generators (One day I will be lucky enough to make it to this, the most isolated music
festival in the world). With producer Justin Adams, Lo’Jo recorded Tinariwen’s first album The
Radio Tisdas Sessions, which was essentially a compilation of their tapes. To record the album they
used a Tamashek radio station in Kidal, Mali, that only had electricity for a couple of hours in
the evening. The album was to become a beacon, shedding light on West African music, at the very
time when the term “world music” was entering the musical lexicon.

Tinariwen ~ Chet Boghassa (Amassakoul)
Tinariwen ~ Tahult in (Imidiwaren)
Tinariwen ~ ImazagheAdagh (Imidiwaren)
Tinariwen ~ Cler Achel (Aman Iman)

The initial international success of the album paved the way for Tinariwen to get on the road and
bring their take on Tamashek music to the world. In the last decade they have become the darlings
of the international festival circuit, playing niche folk and “world music” festivals and behemoths
such as Glastonbury. Many traditional non-Western folk acts tend to dilute their music to appeal to
western audiences. Not so for Tinariwen, their music already contained elements of blues, rock
and reggae. With critically acclaimed album, after critically acclaimed album, they have stayed
loyal to the principles of assouf and have moulded a sound that is utterly unique to them.

With their tribal dress worn on stage as a statement, like a leather jacket or a mohican, I really
can’t think of any other band that is as truly rock’n’roll as Tinariwen. With the exception of the
almost incredible life story of the “Black President” himself, a certain Fela Kuti. Who along with
other artists I will be featuring in my continuing series on the magnificence of West African
music.



The war between the Touareg, the Malian government, and Islamists, continues today in Northern
Mali.
 
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D

Deleted member 685

Non Registered Member
GUEST
Music, I always find, is the great leveler. Good music can even bring greater understanding between a pinko like me and, how shall I put it, a man from your political neck of the woods.

I am a huge Touré and Tinariwen fan. Both of whom are hugely influenced by black American music, along with the wonderful World of West African music heritage. If you are interested here is an article I wrote on my former site about Tinariwen. One of the last great rock bands on this planet.

Most, if not all songs featured are on YouTube.


Screw No.179 ~ Tinariwen: Warrior
Poets

Posted on January 16, 2014 by Dadaist



Tinariwen (people of the desert) have been described as “the most rock’n’roll (band) of them all”.
Artists are not known for shying away from politics and the protest song was for decades a badge of
honour for many musicians. The difference with Tinariwen is that they are a little bit more
involved with their politics. The band formed in 1979, in a Touareg camp in Algeria. The Touareg
are a nomadic Berber people who have inhabited the Sahara desert for over a thousand years. Their
traditional lands, centred on Northern Mali, cross five West African countries whose national
borders were devised by some simple-minded colonial civil servants in the 19th century. Following
the collapse of French colonial rule in North Africa in the 1960’s, the Touareg people were seen as
racially inferior to Southern Malians and were brutally forced into the modern world by a new
Malian government trying to consolidate its power. The Touareg rebelled and were ruthlessly
scattered across North Africa to live mainly in desert camps for decades to come. Many of the
members of Tinariwen were born in these camps and in 1991 they hung up their guitars and picked up
their guns and went to war for their people’s independence. Legend has it that one band member used
to ride a horse into battle with his guitar strapped to his back and a Kalashnikov in his hand, and
is purported to have received 17 bullet wounds in his days as a
rebel.

Tinariwen ~ Imidiwaren (The Radio Tisdas Sessions)
Tinariwen ~ Tenhert (Imidiwaren)

Tinariwen’s music is at times haunting, at times hypnotic escapism, and with its often stripped
bare simplicity you can almost feel the vast expanse of the desert in the reverberation of the
guitars and the harmony of the vocals. The songs are sung in the Touareg dialect of Tamashek, in a
singing style called assouf, which is an expression of a deep nostalgia felt by most Touareg when
they are absent from their homeland. The vocals are backed by subtle percussion and anything up to
six electric guitars. Ibrahim Ag Alhabibe, one of the founding members with the distinctive almost
afro-like hair style, and the look of a traditional rock star, helped introduce the electric guitar
to Touareg music. He made his first guitar from a jerry can and some bicycle brake cable. His
playing style was influenced by Malian “desert blues” greats such as Boubacar Traoré.
He was first introduced to rock and reggae in the rebel camps, and it wasn’t long before he
hooked up some battery-powered amps and he and his friends performed around the campfires, and at
local weddings, with the initial intention of providing music for the people to escape from the
harsh realities of their daily existence.

Tinariwen ~ Amassakoul ‘N’Ténéré (Amassakoul)
Tinariwen ~ Tamatant Tilay (Aman Iman)

The band made rudimentary recordings on cassette tapes, and during the five-year long rebellion in
the 1990’s, with no telephone or postal system to carry information, their songs became
communiqués. The music carried messages on how to organize for independence and reputedly also
carried coded messages to help spread plans for action. In 2000, French band Lo’Jo witnessed
Tinariwen at The Festival In the Desert, which is essentially a traditional Touareg gathering with
modern generators (One day I will be lucky enough to make it to this, the most isolated music
festival in the world). With producer Justin Adams, Lo’Jo recorded Tinariwen’s first album The
Radio Tisdas Sessions, which was essentially a compilation of their tapes. To record the album they
used a Tamashek radio station in Kidal, Mali, that only had electricity for a couple of hours in
the evening. The album was to become a beacon, shedding light on West African music, at the very
time when the term “world music” was entering the musical lexicon.

Tinariwen ~ Chet Boghassa (Amassakoul)
Tinariwen ~ Tahult in (Imidiwaren)
Tinariwen ~ ImazagheAdagh (Imidiwaren)
Tinariwen ~ Cler Achel (Aman Iman)

The initial international success of the album paved the way for Tinariwen to get on the road and
bring their take on Tamashek music to the world. In the last decade they have become the darlings
of the international festival circuit, playing niche folk and “world music” festivals and behemoths
such as Glastonbury. Many traditional non-Western folk acts tend to dilute their music to appeal to
western audiences. Not so for Tinariwen, their music already contained elements of blues, rock
and reggae. With critically acclaimed album, after critically acclaimed album, they have stayed
loyal to the principles of assouf and have moulded a sound that is utterly unique to them.

With their tribal dress worn on stage as a statement, like a leather jacket or a mohican, I really
can’t think of any other band that is as truly rock’n’roll as Tinariwen. With the exception of the
almost incredible life story of the “Black President” himself, a certain Fela Kuti. Who along with
other artists I will be featuring in my continuing series on the magnificence of West African
music.



The war between the Touareg, the Malian government, and Islamists, continues today in Northern
Mali.


Good article. And since you put it like that, here's something from Tinariwen and my political neck of the woods....

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fyyt0GWtzw0


And I'm sure roc will love this number from Afro-Celt Sound System.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFNSTSGeUqM
 

Dadaist

PI Member
Nov 1, 2015
391
84
Before de auld leaba, here is a couple of tracks from the second and third waves of Detroit techno masters. The modern underground would be lost without Motown. Its city may be dying but its four-to-the-floor will live for eternity.



I will never forget when Jeff Mills 'The Bells' came out. David Holmes gave it its Irish debut in the majestic environs of a packed Temple Street Church, in Dublin in the late 90's. The city's nightlife really has regressed since the heady days of the 90's.

And to think I grew up thinking techno was white boy European music ;)
 
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roc_

roc_

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There is a fair bit of shite prevalent in the black culture too. Roc has cherry picked some fine examples of great tracks. But he could equally have thrown up, the probably even more "popular" music and videos which reflect just how far liberal capitalism and moral breakdown have penetrated that community too. I would also say that it comes back to another cultural group who control the financial success and promotion of black music these days, and who ensure that the worse elements, the stuff designed to reinforce that community breakdown, rises to the top.
Yes, I want to come back to this when I have more time. But this is true.

Suffice to say that where most of the great music lies is where white-commercialism has not tainted.

Nearly everywhere you look at black music you can apply this rule. Whether it is the early music of New Orleans and the ethos that still persists there (to make music in and for itself rather than for commercial success).

Or whether it was the rise of hip hop during the early 80's economic crisis, that set the foundations for so many subsequent mainstream movements - that while these following movements may have become base, what gave rise to them was beautiful and full of real good energy and life.

Similarly, wrt Daists post just above, the UR collective eschewed all commercialism - they maintained an anti-mainstream business strategy, promoting a certain political activism, and the music and club culture that they engendered is quite special for that.

Someone above mentioned Miles Davis. Now, what most people know of him today is only because many many decades later he became subsequently commercialised, and his music was opened up to very broad white audiences. But before that happened, he had a very real effect on white culture in the US. White people dancing to Jazz music. Not everyone, mind.

While perhaps a lot of the pioneer geniuses of more recent times may have eluded the same treatment so far, they indeed had a similar effect. White people dancing to black music, and black tempos, and in the process, something arising up in groups of people both black and white that brought them together and enriched in multifold ways.
 
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roc_

roc_

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... probably even more "popular" music and videos which reflect just how far liberal capitalism and moral breakdown have penetrated ...
Really good documentary here about how the music that rose up in the 70's and 80's came about on the back of the breakdown of liberal capitalism. It was a period of creativity that occurred outside of it. But then when liberal capitalism again rose up, it assimilated all of that creativity and made it its own. Highly recommended. Here's a trailer:

 
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