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The Death Penalty

An Dlí Dearmadta

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The last victim of capital punishment in Ireland happened in 1954. Do you believe it should return in the 21st Century?
For heinous crimes such as rape, child molestation and murder without reason, I personally believe this to be orderly and just.
In the coming years we will see crime and a general nature not seen here before due to changing demographics
The hangman will deter many, resulting in a greater safety
 

NiceNin

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The last victim of capital punishment in Ireland happened in 1954. Do you believe it should return in the 21st Century?
For heinous crimes such as rape, child molestation and murder without reason, I personally believe this to be orderly and just.
In the coming years we will see crime and a general nature not seen here before due to changing demographics
The hangman will deter many, resulting in a greater safety
Ray Burke abolished the death penalty for treason when Minister for Justice in 1990.

Now we know why.
 

The Field Marshal

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Better not let antipope francis hear you talking like that.
That bad bollox is always telling God that He is wrong about everything including the death penalty .
 

El Chaval.

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In certain cases yes.
But it's not going to happen, so putting it In your manifesto is pointless.
The first country to abolish the death penalty was...........(drumroll)...Venezuela.
 

Conall Gulban

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The last victim of capital punishment in Ireland happened in 1954. Do you believe it should return in the 21st Century?
For heinous crimes such as rape, child molestation and murder without reason, I personally believe this to be orderly and just.
In the coming years we will see crime and a general nature not seen here before due to changing demographics
The hangman will deter many, resulting in a greater safety
The problem is, as has happened many times especially in the US, innocent people end up being executed.
 
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An Dlí Dearmadta

An Dlí Dearmadta

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In certain cases yes.
But it's not going to happen, so putting it In your manifesto is pointless.
The first country to abolish the death penalty was...........(drumroll)...Venezuela.
Nobody knows the future
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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The National Party propose to re instate it, Fine Gael welcome some of the depravity
I was raised Presbyterian so I learned "Whosoever shall shed man's blood, his blood shall be shed: for man was made to the image of God" (Genesis 9:11) as a kid and that the Noahic Covenant (not to be confused with the Rabbinic understanding of "Noahide Laws") is still in force otherwise we would not still see rainbows. I still agree with this though I am a Catholic now, however we have to be at the same time pragmatic- willful murder deserves the death penalty, that I have no argument with, however I do not trust the current powers that be with the power of legal execution. I think that National Party are correct objectively about this BUT given the current realities they are being foolish, there are much bigger fish to fry and they risk turning people off who would otherwise be sympathetic to them. Keep in mind a lot of Catholics here are convinced that the death penalty is against Church teaching.
 
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Politically Incorrect Paper of the Day: Death Penalty Eugenics - Marginal REVOLUTION
Anthropologist Peter Frost and anthropologist and population geneticist Henry Harpending argue that killing murderers pacified the population eugenically.

At the beginning of [1500]… the English homicide rate was about 20 to 40 per year per 100,000 people. At the end [1750, AT], it was about 2 to 4 per 100,000, i.e., a 10-fold reduction (Eisner, 2001).
…Can this leftward shift be explained by the high execution rate between 1500 and 1750? During that period, 0.5 to 1% of all men were removed from each generation through court-ordered executions and a comparable proportion through extrajudicial executions, i.e., deaths of offenders at the scene of the crime or in prison while awaiting trial. The total execution rate was thus somewhere between 1 and 2%. These men were permanently removed from the population, as was the heritable component of their propensity for homicide. If we assume a standard normal distribution in the male population, the most violent 1 to 2% should form a right-hand “tail” that begins 2.33–2.05 SD to the right of the mean propensity for homicide. If we eliminate this right-hand tail and leave only the other 98-99% to survive and reproduce, we have a selection differential of 0.027 to 0.049 SD per generation.
…The reader can see that this selection differential, which we derived from the execution rate, is at most a little over half the selection differential of 0.08 SD per generation that we derived from the historical decline in the homicide rate.
Thus, the authors argue that it is possible that a substantial decline in criminality can be explained by the eugenics of execution. The authors, assume, however, that executed criminals have no offspring which is unlikely, especially if criminals have higher fertility rates.
The death penalty was used by the british to cull a large portion of the population it saw as unfit, though the vast majority of those sentenced where pardoned, something Naomi Wolf didn't seem to understand.

Through partial verdicts, juries reduced the charges against many convicted defendants. Through the mechanisms of benefit of clergy and pardons many more defendants found guilty of a capital offence were spared the death penalty and sentenced instead to punishments such as branding, transportation, or imprisonment. Many received no punishment at all.
Before the state got its act together they had.
Thief-taker - Wikipedia
England in the seventeenth and eighteenth century suffered a great deal of political and economic disorders that brought violence into its streets.[2] This was particularly evident in the capital and its neighbourhoods,[2] where the population almost corresponded to that of England and Wales together.[3] In fact London was expanding at a fast pace, so that there were no precise division between wealthy and poor areas, the rich living next to the poor.[4] A major cause was immigration: an impressive number of different cultural groups migrated to the big city in search of fortune and social mobility, contributing to saturate jobs availability and making cohabitation a difficult matter.[5]
History repeats, the issue now is that the police that were created due to the Macdaniel affair - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core, could do their job, but now diversity and political correctness seems to have neutered them in the face of all the new immigration invasion and the criminal chaos that it has always brought, like in the past.

As i referenced here Catholic Church was pro death penalty or at the very least was not against it until recently when Francis changed the Catechism on some dignity nonsense Update To Catechism On Death Penalty - Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph.

Surveys in 2009 suggested that up to 70% of the population supported the restoration of the death penalty, however it is unlikely that the constitution will be changed, as both religious and human rights groups have strongly opposed restoration.[9]
By 2018, support for the use of the death penalty had grown significantly. 57% of Brazilians support the death penalty. The age group that shows the greatest support for execution of those condemned is the 25 to 34-year-old category, in which 61% say they are in favour.[12]
...
A 2017 poll study found younger Mexicans are more likely to support capital punishment.[10]
People in Mexico and Brazil as example, especially the young are pro death penalty, but good luck getting it passed in Mexico as example where the Mexican criminal gangs run half the country. Again would be a good thing to bring back especially for treason in these places, especially in many countries in South america that seem to be run by the same elite families who just swap turns on enriching themselves.

Its going to come back at some point if you want to maintain order, as the west starts to collapse in on itself, as a way to counter the coming violence as the states monopoly of violence is waning, otherwise we will start to resemble places like Mexico and Brazil more and more, but that might be the plan, if there is anything resembling a plan.
 

The Field Marshal

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I was raised Presbyterian so I learned "Whosoever shall shed man's blood, his blood shall be shed: for man was made to the image of God" (Genesis 9:11) as a kid and that the Noahic Covenant (not to be confused with the Rabbinic understanding of "Noahide Laws") is still in force otherwise we would not still see rainbows. I still agree with this though I am a Catholic now, however we have to be at the same time pragmatic- willful murder deserves the death penalty, that I have no argument with, however I do not trust the current powers that be with the power of legal execution. I think that National Party are correct objectively about this BUT given the current realities they are being foolish, there are much bigger fish to fry and they risk turning people off who would otherwise be sympathetic to them. Keep in mind a lot of Catholics here are convinced that the death penalty is against Church teaching.
The more ignorant ones think that.
The Catholic Church continues to allow the death penalty.

Antipope francises, rants have no authority.
 
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