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Self Moderated Survival General Discussion

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Anderson

Anderson

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How to stop potato blight

To prevent blight, plant your potatoes in a breezy spot with plenty of space between plants, and treat with fungicide before blight appears. It’s also important to rotate crops regularly to prevent build up of the disease in the soil, and to remove and destroy infected plants and tubers as soon as blight develops.

What is potato blight?

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Blight is a fungal disease caused by spores of Phytophthora infestans which are spread on the wind and which can also contaminate potato tubers in the soil. Here’s what you need to know about blight and what you can do to stop it.

Warm, humid weather, especially during the late summer is a perfect breeding ground for blight. In southern counties of the UK, potato blight can strike as early as June, and though it’s most damaging to outdoor crops, it can affect greenhouse produce too.

What does potato blight look like?

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Dark brown blotches appear around leaf tips and edges, spreading towards the middle, shrivelling and rotting the leaf. At the same time, white fungal spores develop on the undersides of the leaves, around the lesions, and further brown lesions develop on the stems. The leaves and stems rapidly blacken and rot, and the plant collapses.

Spores are released on the wind and quickly spread to infect neighbouring plants. They're also washed into the soil where they can infect potato tubers causing a red-brown rot directly beneath the skin which slowly spreads towards the centre of the tuber.

Heavy rain washes the fungal spores of late blight into the soil, where it overwinters. The disease also persists in infected potato tubers left in the ground or on the compost heap. Sometimes these tubers grow the following year to produce infected shoots which release fungal spores onto the wind to infect new crops.


How stop potato blight - top tips


There’s little you can do to save an infected crop, so stopping blight is all about taking precautions to reduce the chances of the disease attacking your crop:

  • • Plant healthy, disease-free seed potatoes from a reputable supplier. Early crops, harvested before the worst of the blight season, have less chance of being exposed.
  • • Always choose an open planting site with good airflow and leave sufficient space between plants. Better airflow helps the foliage to dry quickly after rain, slowing the spread of blight between plants.
  • • In dry weather, water plants in the morning so that any moisture on the leaves can evaporate during the day. Water at the base of the plant only.
  • • Crop rotation helps prevent a build up of disease spores in the ground, and avoids infected plants growing from potato tubers that were missed during last year’s harvest.
  • • When they're ready for harvest, make sure you dig up every last potato so blight has nowhere to hide during the winter.
  • • Spray potato crops with a protective fungicide before signs of blight appear. Start from June, especially if the weather’s wet. Spray again after a few weeks to protect new growth.
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What to do if blight strikes


Should your potatoes show signs of blight, remove and destroy all affected plants. If your potatoes have already developed tubers, you might be able to save them by cutting away the foliage and stems. Leave the soil undisturbed for 2–3 weeks to kill off any lingering spores so that they don’t infect the crop when it is lifted.

Given that old potato tubers can harbour blight spores over winter, it’s important to destroy any unwanted or diseased tubers. Don’t put them on the compost heap. Also remove any plants that spring up the following season from old tubers that were left in the ground over winter.



Sprays




Homemade Potato Blight Spray: make your own

Homemade potato blight spray
There are two solutions you can make at home to help fight blight in your potatoes.

The first and more effective of the two is known as Bordeaux formula which is a mixture of lime, water and copper sulphate.

The second solution is known as the Cornell formula and is also a good preventative spray against potato blight.

Bordeaux formula
To make a solution of Bordeaux formula you should:

  • Mix 1 pound of slaked / hydrated lime in 1 gallon of water
  • Mix 1 pound of Copper Sulphate crystals/powder in 1 gallon of water
  • Fill a container with 2 gallons of water and add 1 quart (950mls) of copper sulphate solution and 1 quart of lime solution.
  • The Bordeaux formula is now ready to use.
The Cornell formula
Combine:

  • 1 gallon of water with 1 tablespoon of baking soda,
  • 1 tablespoon of oil (although vegetable oil will work, horticultural oil is best)
  • 2 drops of dishwashing liquid or insecticidal soap.
  • Mix it thoroughly and repeatedly shake it during use.
No matter which spray you choose, it should be applied in the mornings after removing any blighted leaves if possible. (this may not be an option if you have too many potatoes to go through)

Ensure to get the spray on the undersides of the leaves as well as on top of the leaves with your chosen fungicide.

Try to get this applied during dry weather and allow it to dry.
 

Storybud2

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go out and if you are under 60 with decent health,, GET THE VIRUS,,,,

For once and I really hate Nietzsche cos he was a miserable fooking weirdo,, "What ever does not kill you makes you stronger" ,

yep , for once,, that quote makes sense within certain limits,, it certainly does not work for an 88 year old with Asthma, , or many other ailments,
but, that is the long game going on at the moment for the working class, kids etc,, poor Countries with no ventilators etc,,

As the "herd" is being trimmed and the irony of the Chinese starting the virus (as per their one child policy) for the last 40 years is never picked up in MSM ?

Get some level of immunity with antibodies is probably best for the long term, mother nature or artificial ? who the fook knows ?

2 or 3 weeks of discomfort may save your life when you get older and the next Corona pandemic hits ? cos it fooking will , down the line,
 

TheKing

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go out and if you are under 60 with decent health,, GET THE VIRUS,,,,

For once and I really hate Nietzsche cos he was a miserable fooking weirdo,, "What ever does not kill you makes you stronger" ,

yep , for once,, that quote makes sense within certain limits,, it certainly does not work for an 88 year old with Asthma, , or many other ailments,
but, that is the long game going on at the moment for the working class, kids etc,, poor Countries with no ventilators etc,,

As the "herd" is being trimmed and the irony of the Chinese starting the virus (as per their one child policy) for the last 40 years is never picked up in MSM ?

Get some level of immunity with antibodies is probably best for the long term, mother nature or artificial ? who the fook knows ?

2 or 3 weeks of discomfort may save your life when you get older and the next Corona pandemic hits ? cos it fooking will , down the line,
Less than 5% of the world is truly healthy, telling the young to go out and get the virus is playing Russian Roulette.
 
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