Stay healthy this winter.

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#1
Some posters here got very sick last winter. This is a good time of the year to try and boost your immune system. There are many ways to do this but one simple and inexpensive way to try and PREVENT yourself from catching anything this time around is to take Echinacea drops. I'm not here to advertise any brands but as Vogel's Echinacea drops are in most healthfood stores and even in the chemists now, you could do worse than take them. I recommend leaving a third or so of the bottle aside after taking it for a fortnight or so. If you do feel yourself coming down with something its great to have some at hand because it is brilliant at nipping things in the bud. I've been using it for years and it is literally a life saver as I used to catch everything going before then. It saved me again this week, started getting that awful cold feeling in the bones when a cold/flu is coming - took ten drops every hour and it ran that bug out of town straight away. It is a jungle out there now and we are being bombarded with toxins and God knows what else these days. For approx ten euro, you could do a lot worse. Anyway, stay well.

Echinacea Tea: Benefits and Nutrition Facts
 

Mowl

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#2
Fresh garlic, ginger, and any root vegetables serve me better than any medications, herbal or pharmaceutical. Home cooking every evening is also a very zen and healthy approach to modern life. Turn on the news and chop and prepare your chosen meal ingredients, take time over each foodstuff to prepare and cook it to it's best, and then be sure to keep a bottle of wine for chef's privileges. Never use processed foods of any kind: nothing frozen, nothing prepacked, nothing tinned or bottled, and nothing from the junk supermarkets.

Cooking in the evening is, for me, the true end of the day. I take sauna for an hour beforehand, and a large amount of tap water (freezing cold and non-fluoridated) to re-hydrate. Then a mixture of white wine with grape juice and lönkerö (a Finnish fruit alcohol) over plenty of ice while cooking and digesting the news of the day.

For dessert, I usually go for more white wine mixed as before.

Haven't been sick with any bugs in years.

That and regular exercise tends to be the best medicine.

Oh - definitely cut out binge drinking: nothing taxes the body like it.
 
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#3
Fresh garlic, ginger, and any root vegetables serve me better than any medications, herbal or pharmaceutical. Home cooking every evening is also a very zen and healthy approach to modern life. Turn on the news and chop and prepare your chosen meal ingredients, take time over each foodstuff to prepare and cook it to it's best, and then be sure to keep a bottle of wine for chef's privileges. Never use processed foods of any kind: nothing frozen, nothing prepacked, nothing tinned or bottled, and nothing from the junk supermarkets.

Cooking in the evening is, for me, the true end of the day. I take sauna for an hour beforehand, and a large amount of tap water (freezing cold and non-fluoridated) to re-hydrate. Then a mixture of white wine with grape juice and lönkerö (a Finnish fruit alcohol) over plenty of ice while cooking and digesting the news of the day.

For dessert, I usually go for more white wine mixed as before.

Haven't been sick with any bugs in years.

That and regular exercise tends to be the best medicine.

Oh - definitely cut out binge drinking: nothing taxes the body like it.
If you go to your local herbalist, you will find garlic (allium sativum) and ginger (zingibar) are there too and are considered herbs. Everything you say is bang on the money, but I don't think the average Irish lad/lassie is as good as yourself at minding the body. I could make a massive post about all the things we can do to boost our immune systems, but this is simple and effective and cheap. Continued good health to you Mowl.
 

Mowl

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#4
Thanks, Bro. You too. I base my diet around a winter period which lasts for several months. These are months of severe temperatures and very limited amounts of daylight. Many Nordic folk choose to use light-boxes to maintain decent levels in their resistance. The box sits on a table and emits a high level of blue filtered ultraviolet light in the hopes of replacing lost levels due to the lack of daylight. It can lead to severe depression as well as a tendency to lean on drugs and alcohol to maintain, but light-boxing is a popular method of making up for lost vitamins.

Personally, I'm in a position to alter my daytime activities depending on the clock. During winter, I wake much earlier in the mornings in order to begin the day before daylight even arrives. This frees up time in the later afternoon for walking in the light and cycling to keep the muscles in good order.

But it takes a very strong will to deal with the Nordic winters.

Many cannot handle it and leave after trying one or two seasons of it.

Personally, I love the winter season; the entire country is covered in snow which also helps illuminate the city streets during the dark periods. If the choice were between a typical minus forty few months and the damp and shiver of Irish winter, then I'd always opt for the Arctic version: it's so much more dramatic and enlivening, it sets the blood moving and heart pumping to drag yourself and your big boots across the fields and the frozen over bays.

Irish damp is a slow killer: it gets into the bones and is nearly impossible to shake off.

Finnish winter is easier to handle on those terms: we get a very dry cold, no damp at all, really.

Big furry coats and hats, massive boots, decent fresh food and a sense of adventure and high spirits tend to keep the mind balanced and the body working at peak levels. I spinal have surgery in six weeks time: I'm getting some nice titanium inserted into my neck and shoulders to try to release the nerves which have seized up from a combination of repetitive stress injuries and some mild carpal tunnel syndromes issues. My diet will be the same when I come out as it was when I go in: I get regular blood tests for all levels of minerals and so on, so it's easier to monitor progress or decay in the system. I only wish that Irish people had access to such standards in medicine and practice, but it looks like we're still decades off on that score.

A youthful outlook and positive attitude does wonders for the body.

I'm genuinely amazed to have found it at source up here: the Finnish elements demand it of you.
 
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#5
Thanks, Bro. You too. I base my diet around a winter period which lasts for several months. These are months of severe temperatures and very limited amounts of daylight. Many Nordic folk choose to use light-boxes to maintain decent levels in their resistance. The box sits on a table and emits a high level of blue filtered ultraviolet light in the hopes of replacing lost levels due to the lack of daylight. It can lead to severe depression as well as a tendency to lean on drugs and alcohol to maintain, but light-boxing is a popular method of making up for lost vitamins.

Personally, I'm in a position to alter my daytime activities depending on the clock. During winter, I wake much earlier in the mornings in order to begin the day before daylight even arrives. This frees up time in the later afternoon for walking in the light and cycling to keep the muscles in good order.

But it takes a very strong will to deal with the Nordic winters.

Many cannot handle it and leave after trying one or two seasons of it.

Personally, I love the winter season; the entire country is covered in snow which also helps illuminate the city streets during the dark periods. If the choice were between a typical minus forty few months and the damp and shiver of Irish winter, then I'd always opt for the Arctic version: it's so much more dramatic and enlivening, it sets the blood moving and heart pumping to drag yourself and your big boots across the fields and the frozen over bays.

Irish damp is a slow killer: it gets into the bones and is nearly impossible to shake off.

Finnish winter is easier to handle on those terms: we get a very dry cold, no damp at all, really.

Big furry coats and hats, massive boots, decent fresh food and a sense of adventure and high spirits tend to keep the mind balanced and the body working at peak levels. I spinal have surgery in six weeks time: I'm getting some nice titanium inserted into my neck and shoulders to try to release the nerves which have seized up from a combination of repetitive stress injuries and some mild carpal tunnel syndromes issues. My diet will be the same when I come out as it was when I go in: I get regular blood tests for all levels of minerals and so on, so it's easier to monitor progress or decay in the system. I only wish that Irish people had access to such standards in medicine and practice, but it looks like we're still decades off on that score.

A youthful outlook and positive attitude does wonders for the body.

I'm genuinely amazed to have found it at source up here: the Finnish elements demand it of you.
You're a mighty man Mowl. And you're right - morning is key. Also, the best things in life are free - sunlight, oxygen and GRAVITY! I've been practicing Zhan Zhuang for about five years. As you are interested in health I hope you take a look at this clip, the full documentary is on youtube also. If you do fancy a go at it, the key is the slight bend in the knee which takes out the curve in the lower back and to move the knees out a fraction, and i mean a fraction, so as the weight spills down into the feet. 'Grounding' alone will boost your health and ZZ is grounding to the nth. I consider myself blessed to have been introduced to it. Doctor Tent has a great video on youtube about Grounding too if you're interested. Sound. (and best of luck with surgery.)

 

Mowl

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#6
As I've grown older, I've found that fine-tuning the mind and the body becomes easier rather than more difficult or even physically painful. Methods like inventing my own yoga positions and stretches are something to look forward to at the day's end more so than a bother or an issue: the grind of the days work can be different depending on the type of projects I'm working on. Some are very physical and aggressive and require a stamina and determination which can be very draining. Other days are spent sitting over an array of technology with total concentration upon accuracy. At the days end, both produce different stresses on the body, so different methods are employed to work on specific ailments to work out. If there are any other maladies which are more difficult to either understand the reasons for or are too difficult to find home treatments for, a quick call to the doctor and a meeting soon sorts things out.

I deal with chronic depression using a combination of prescribed medication and physical work-outs. They work extremely well for me and I can change the routine depending on the situation work-wise. Limiting the effects of depression is vital in warding off the possibilities of mental stagnation and physical fatigue. Depression affects different people in a number of different ways and there's no one single cure-all available. Nor should there be, in my opinion. Each sufferer knows in themselves where triggers lie, but many can't face the effort of working that hard on maintaining a good mental outlook, and others are simply too ill to even try.

Again: I put a lot of my good fortune in these , my middle years, into the fact that I live in a country where all aspects of one's personal health are accounted for. There simply isn't any comparison between health services up here and those back in Ireland. None whatsoever. I'm in excellent hands, and yesterday my surgeon and I went through my MRI scans with a fine toothcomb while at the same time working on the physical locations of the damage. That was quite an experience: he was very open about the pros and cons of the surgery I'll be taking and mention a three to five per cent possibility that it won't work; a five to seven per cent possibility that it may not work completely and require further invasive procedures, and a very nice sixty-five per cent guarantee that my voice box will drop the tone of my voice by at least on full octave for about five to six weeks and then a gradual return to normal. Upon leaving the hospital, I called my agent and told her the news.

I'm being lined up for a few week's voice-over work, a trade I've been in since my youth.

See?

Every cloud has a silver lining - if you look at it the right way.

I just wish Irish folk had the same quality of care; it would change our world completely.
 
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