State pension in Ireland for most of us wont kick in until we are at least 68!

Yonghoi

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Interesting link P O'Neill, thanks. There may yet be hope. I'll follow that up.

Edit: I just dug this out from my email records. This is what Welfare.ie wrote to me a couple of years ago:

"Under current legislation a person needs at least 520 paid contributions and a yearly average of 10 to qualify for minimum rate pension.
A yearly average of 48-52 is required for maximum rate pension.
Yearly average is calculated by dividing the number of years from your date of entry into insurable employment to the year before your 66th birthday into the total contributions paid and credited."

I presume a 'contribution' is your monthly deduction from salary. So you need 520 months salary for a minimum rate pension.
That's 43 years of contributions to get a basic minimum pension. I worked in Ireland for 30 years - hence what I was told seems correct.
 
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Rip off private pension scam Bugs. Front loaded fees are commonplace.
But the Irish State ripped me off even worse!
I started work at 20 and did 30 years in a PAYE paying job where I was on top rate tax for all of it.
Resigned and left Ireland in 2010.
I recently enquired on my eligibility for a State Pension and was told I don’t qualify. Haven’t ‘enough stamps’, whatever the fk that means. I’ve given (actually had confiscated) half of my large earnings for 30 years and the Irish State says bugger off.
I won’t get upset about it though, because I may well be dead before I reach their currently planned retirement age, and if I survive to 68 I believe they’ll by then have made it 70 or just abolished it altogether. So although your friend will still get something back for the 30k he invested, i will get absolutely nothing for the hundreds of thousands I had confiscated by the Irish State.
the irish State has always been the biggest crook in the Western world. Read the post above and cringe at how Ireland treats her own.
 

DS86DS

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There won't be a pension for anybody after 2030 when the system collapses because of third world welfare spongers.

And our healthcare and education system probably won't be too far behind.

Culturally enriched Ireland brought to you courtesy of Leo's FG.
 

TW Tone

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Bugs and TW Tone, thanks for the input, but since I don't live in Ireland anymore I can't just drop into a Citizens Advice Bureau. But to answer your question TW - I first became aware of my predicament when one of my ex colleagues (also living abroad) told me he has continued to make voluntary PRSI payments to ensure he gets his State Pension. That spurred me to make enquiries to the Social Welfare (Pensions) dept. They told me that I don't have enough 'stamps' - a word I remember my parents using decades ago when they were preparing to draw a pension. I can't believe such an archaic system still even exists. It's a throwback from the days when people actually had some kind of book to collect 'stamps' for pension eligibility. So I asked how to get more stamps and they told me I could have done like my colleague and continued making voluntary contributions (probably around 100 or 200 euro a month for the next 5 years or more) but that option had expired now since I was out of work for a year by then - not that I'd have been willing to take a dumb punt like that anyhow!
The other option is to go back to work. Back to dear ould Oirland to get ripped off for several more years by the taxman. Not a chance. As Boris might say - I'd rather be dead in a ditch.

Anyhow what I see coming after the next big recession (any day now folks) is a Means Test for the State Pension. If you own a home or have other assetts or savings you'll get the same as me - sweet FA.

Since there could be serious money at issue, I think you should make it your business to spend a week in Ireland to really research this. Maybe I misunderstood-- I thought you had paid in for 30 years, but then you say you didn't have sufficient stamps.
By the way, stamps is now just a handy shorthand for contributions, though no one I have talked to uses the word.
If you worked 30 years you must be in your 50s, now's the time to get this straightened. I'm not too far from your age and have investigated my own situation, having lived in US for many years. I found the Citizens Advice Centres very useful. At least a good place for you to start.

Social Welfare, Driving Licenses, Banks, etc---the whole cabal of them pull a 'Habitual Residence' stunt to screw returning Irish emigrants--beware.
 

TW Tone

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Some readers may be unaware of the following.

First: While you are on welfare your stamp or PRSI contribution is paid for you by the state every week.

Second: Ten years continual payments entitle you to the full state pension. I think about 240 for a single person, another 140 for the spouse. Approx. For Life. A good pension by international standards. Not too far off 20K per annum. Combine it with another source and you're comfortable. Especially if you are living somewhere cheaper than Ireland.

Third: A foreign migrant can arrive in this country, never work a day in his life, go on welfare, and enjoy a full pension for the rest of his days. The optimal age for him to do this would be the mid 50s. He could go on dole or disability or Job Seekers for ten years, then he gets the full pension, and retires back to his homeland. Unlike Job Seekers, the pension imposes no restrictions as to where you live.

Do I believe there is already a cohort of foreigners who have done this and are now drawing the Irish State pension having never worked a day in Ireland?
I most certainly do.
If you want to find them, look first in Poland and Nigeria.
 

Catalpa

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Well speaking as a pensioner I can tell you the system is unsustainable

- but no Government has the gumption to tell the voters the bitter truth...

They simply cannot keep on paying out at current levels with the Pension Time Bomb ticking ever louder in the years to come

When you submit a claim Please keep all documentation relating to the places you worked safe eg pay slips, bank transfers, references

- you might well need them to prove you did actually work here & there

I found out to my cost [though it may be different these days with so much being electronic] that some of my employers back in the 70s/80s were not paying in my PRSI payments

- and hence officially I was neither registered as employed or unemployed!

After voluminous correspondence I did manage to get them to accept that my claims were bona fide

- it might have helped my case that this was the time when they did a huge 'review' of back cases as people esp female workers were claiming they were out of pocket due to changes brought in after the 2011 cut backs on pensions

I think they just gave it to anybody with a plausible if not definitively provable case

At least I was Honest about it.

The poster who said he did not have enough 'Stamps' that is both true and false - you would not get a full pension

- but I'm pretty certain you are entitled to some level of payment on the 30 years you did work here

- I doubt on its own though it would be enough to live on.
 

TW Tone

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Interesting link P O'Neill, thanks. There may yet be hope. I'll follow that up.

Edit: I just dug this out from my email records. This is what Welfare.ie wrote to me a couple of years ago:

"Under current legislation a person needs at least 520 paid contributions and a yearly average of 10 to qualify for minimum rate pension.
A yearly average of 48-52 is required for maximum rate pension.
Yearly average is calculated by dividing the number of years from your date of entry into insurable employment to the year before your 66th birthday into the total contributions paid and credited."

I presume a 'contribution' is your monthly deduction from salary. So you need 520 months salary for a minimum rate pension.
That's 43 years of contributions to get a basic minimum pension. I worked in Ireland for 30 years - hence what I was told seems correct.

That can't be right. Because of my long overseas stint, I will have years of contributions in the low 20s.
But I will get a pension. 85% of the Max, I have been told. I will be penalised for having lived overseas and not paid in during those years. Had I stayed here and gone on the dole I'd be looking toward to the full pension. Recheck that figure.

Someone else mentioned Ireland agreements with countries as to pooling the pension pot. The US has such an agreement, so I could pool my Irish pension rights with my US Social Security entitlements. I don't think this will be to my advantage, but I'll obviously analyse it, maybe pay an accountant, nearer the time. Check whether this is relevant to you.

Don't be reluctant to spend some money on this, the stakes are big for those of us not on Bono or Pat Kenny incomes.
 
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Do I believe there is already a cohort of foreigners who have done this and are now drawing the Irish State pension having never worked a day in Ireland?
I most certainly do.
If you want to find them, look first in Poland and Nigeria.
irish money, in those countries ? living like a pop Star
 

Yonghoi

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Maybe I misunderstood-- I thought you had paid in for 30 years, but then you say you didn't have sufficient stamps.
There does seem to be a contradiction here because your next post said a 10 year contribution earns a full pension - yet I was told I'm not eligible even after 30 years contributing.
By the way, stamps is now just a handy shorthand for contributions, though no one I have talked to uses the word.
Fair enough - about time it was dropped. But they did use it in some conversations IIRC. So it just means 'Contributions'.
If you worked 30 years you must be in your 50s, now's the time to get this straightened. I'm not too far from your age and have investigated my own situation, having lived in US for many years. I found the Citizens Advice Centres very useful. At least a good place for you to start.
I may have to do that too.

Some readers may be unaware of the following.

First: While you are on welfare your stamp or PRSI contribution is paid for you by the state every week.

Second: Ten years continual payments entitle you to the full state pension. I think about 240 for a single person, another 140 for the spouse. Approx. For Life. A good pension by international standards. Not too far off 20K per annum. Combine it with another source and you're comfortable. Especially if you are living somewhere cheaper than Ireland.
So 10 years work = @240 contributions? That's more than one a month. So does this mean a person on fortnightly pay makes twice the number of contributions as someone on monthly pay? What actually constitutes a 'contribution'? Sorry for asking you so many Q's but you seem to have good gen!

Third: A foreign migrant can arrive in this country, never work a day in his life, go on welfare, and enjoy a full pension for the rest of his days. The optimal age for him to do this would be the mid 50s. He could go on dole or disability or Job Seekers for ten years, then he gets the full pension, and retires back to his homeland. Unlike Job Seekers, the pension imposes no restrictions as to where you live.
Anyone who's ever been to a Social Welfare Office will know this is true. Even though I might die before being pensionable it really pisses me off.
I left Ireland because I finally realised I'd struggle along my whole life paying exorbitant taxes to support Ethnic Minority and spongers, and probably get nothing at the end of it.
 
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That can't be right. Because of my long overseas stint, I will have years of contributions in the low 20s.
But I will get a pension. 85% of the Max, I have been told. I will be penalised for having lived overseas and not paid in during those years. Had I stayed here and gone on the dole I'd be looking toward to the full pension.

so some serious scumbags get a better pension than the most hardworking and committed irish ?
 

bugs

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I think you will get a pension.


Also we have agreements with certain countries that may mean your years working post 2010 could count:

Ireland has bilateral social security agreements with Canada, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Austria, Japan, Republic of Korea and Quebec (which has a separate system from the rest of Canada). These agreements are broadly similar and they generally provide that social insurance paid in Ireland and the other country can be combined to help people qualify for old-age and retirement pensions. Again, in general, the method of calculation is similar to the EU rules.



Obviously you should get proper advice just to be sure.
P O NEILL HAS IT RIGHT you should get advice from a pro .
there are two companies in Kilkenny owned by the Clune family --one is called TAXBACK AND TAXMATE they employ over 300 people and are very reputable they may have info for you as they have over 100 people from different countries to provide an international service .
a good pro can be a small accountancy practice who wont rob you and if they are located in or near your home town they are unlikely to risk offending 300 o briens or brennans who ever is the local tribe --for the money involved you should use a pro --p o neill has a better grasp of this than I . bugs
 

Yonghoi

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Thanks guys. Lots of food for thought there, and maybe a glimmer of hope.
 
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