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Single letter .ie domain names

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#1
Hey folks!

I've just received an email from my hosting provider, looks like the powers that be are getting ready to auction off the single and double letter domain names if you have a trademark.

www.p.ie
www.t.ie
www.l.ie

I could see these being worth a pretty penny to the right person, in addition to the various bragging rights you would have.

Anyone looking at grabbing one? I'd be very tempted to buy one myself if I could, but €500 per application (regardless of whether or not you are successful) is a bit too rich for me. :-/
 
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#5
D.ie would be a handy one for undertakers and funeral directors.

Speaking more widely, think of all the Scottish words and placenames that end in 'ie'. There's bound to be a market to be tapped amongst our Caledonian cousins.
 
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#6
Carlos Danger said:
Unless it was steak and kidney. Then it would be a l.ie, and sugar lovers would t.ie themselves up in knots claiming they might d.ie as they v.ie for a place in the spotlight.
I see you stole my thunder on the d.ie thingie.  :mad:

On the plus side, www.cie.ie could lose two letters from its doman name.  :cool:
 
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#9
Dan_Murphy said:
Hey folks!

I've just received an email from my hosting provider, looks like the powers that be are getting ready to auction off the single and double letter domain names if you have a trademark.

www.p.ie
www.t.ie
www.l.ie

I could see these being worth a pretty penny to the right person, in addition to the various bragging rights you would have.

Anyone looking at grabbing one? I'd be very tempted to buy one myself if I could, but €500 per application (regardless of whether or not you are successful) is a bit too rich for me. :-/

It sounds like a bit of another (Irish?) rip off.
Dot .ie websites are grand if you only want to sell in Ireland? Otherwise the much cheaper .com is way better.

If you sell pies in Ireland and want to expand into other countries, p.ie would seem like your best choice?

But it would possibly be your worst.
Anyone doing a search for pies anywhere in the world, other than Ireland, would not find p.ie, using google.
 
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#11
Carlos Danger said:
You're reaching, but i.ie will allow it. ;)
I'll have you know that putting hi/h.ie at the end of a sentence is perfectly normal in my neck of the woods, hi.

(It's an Ulster thing, hi.)
 
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#12
Peppermint said:
It sounds like a bit of another (Irish?) rip off.
Dot .ie websites are grand if you only want to sell in Ireland? Otherwise the much cheaper .com is way better.
I've got a 2 .ie domains, one my name and another a potential future business name. I wanted the .com but it was already taken by a domain reseller. :s

.com, .net, .org, .ie and possibly .tv are all ok I reckon. I wouldn't have any interest in any of the newer domains at all though.
 
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#13
Dan_Murphy said:
I've got a 2 .ie domains, one my name and another a potential future business name. I wanted the .com but it was already taken by a domain reseller. :s

.com, .net, .org, .ie and possibly .tv are all ok I reckon. I wouldn't have any interest in any of the newer domains at all though.
Are you using any of your .ie names currently for a business?
Without adverts how many hits do you get in a week?

You generally won't find a dot .ie address from a google search, unless you are looking from Ireland.
The same is true for every other country though.
A German company selling lots of things you might like, just won't appear in your search results if they have a dot .de address.
 
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#14
Peppermint said:
Are you using any of your .ie names currently for a business?
Without adverts how many hits do you get in a week?
Yes. But for e-mail purposes. There are many more using .IE as their primary brand website.

You generally won't find a dot .ie address from a google search, unless you are looking from Ireland.
They are called Country Code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) for a reason. They are generally country specific. As for Google, I don't have a high opinion of the manglers who have messed up that SE's algorithms.

The same is true for every other country though.
No. Some countries such as Colombia (CO) and Montenegro (ME) have opened their ccTLDs to general registration and the number of external registrations exceeds that of local registrations.

A German company selling lots of things you might like, just won't appear in your search results if they have a dot .de address.
Perhaps you had better leave this domain name and search engine stuff to the professsionals. ::) The .DE ccTLD has around 16 million registrations and Germany does not have as many .COM registrations. In most mature country level markets, the ccTLD, rather than .COM is the dominant TLD in the market and typically has most of the registrations and websites (unless it is the US which uses .COM as its defacto ccTLD).
 
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#15
Many of those one letter domain names, where they are permitted, end up as URL shortener services for large brands.
 
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#16
jmcc said:
Yes. But for e-mail purposes. There are many more using .IE as their primary brand website.

They are called Country Code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) for a reason. They are generally country specific. As for Google, I don't have a high opinion of the manglers who have messed up that SE's algorithms.

No. Some countries such as Colombia (CO) and Montenegro (ME) have opened their ccTLDs to general registration and the number of external registrations exceeds that of local registrations.

Perhaps you had better leave this domain name and search engine stuff to the professsionals. ::) The .DE ccTLD has around 16 million registrations and Germany does not have as many .COM registrations. In most mature country level markets, the ccTLD, rather than .COM is the dominant TLD in the market and typically has most of the registrations and websites (unless it is the US which uses .COM as its defacto ccTLD).
I bow to to your superior knowledge on this subject.
But I still believe a .com address is more useful than a .ie

And you may dislike google, but it is the search engine most people use, I like duckduckgo but that's a minority sport..

I spend lots of time looking for companies in European countries to do what I currently pay faceless people in China to do.
How do you, as a professional, suggest I find the companies I need locally?
All suggestions are welcome..
 

Count Bobulescu

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#17
jmcc said:
Yes. But for e-mail purposes. There are many more using .IE as their primary brand website.

They are called Country Code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) for a reason. They are generally country specific. As for Google, I don't have a high opinion of the manglers who have messed up that SE's algorithms.

No. Some countries such as Colombia (CO) and Montenegro (ME) have opened their ccTLDs to general registration and the number of external registrations exceeds that of local registrations.

Perhaps you had better leave this domain name and search engine stuff to the professsionals. ::) The .DE ccTLD has around 16 million registrations and Germany does not have as many .COM registrations. In most mature country level markets, the ccTLD, rather than .COM is the dominant TLD in the market and typically has most of the registrations and websites (unless it is the US which uses .COM as its defacto ccTLD).
I don't doubt your numbers, I just find them surprisingly low for a country like Germany.

Last I saw, 1-2 years ago, there were about 300M .Coms worldwide, with about 50% in the US.

So the ratio of TLD's to the population would seem to be a lot higher in the US. 50% in the US, versus 20% in Germany. It's thirty years since I've been to Germany, and back then it was still difficult to use a credit card to get a fill of petrol.
I guess they're just not early adopters to the ideas of others.
 
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#18
Count Bobulescu said:
I don't doubt your numbers, I just find them surprisingly low for a country like Germany.
One of the more clueless "metrics" that registries promote is the number of domains per thousand of population. It gives  a very misleading view.

Last I saw, 1-2 years ago, there were about 300M .Coms worldwide, with about 50% in the US.
No. That number is wrong. There was not 300M  .COM domains worldwide. Even the current count is about 121.7 M active. Of the number of active .COM domain names, the US would have approximately 58%. (Will check % later today.) The percentage of US hosted and registered .COM domains would be slightly higher.

So the ratio of TLD's to the population would seem to be a lot higher in the US. 50% in the US, versus 20% in Germany.
As a metric, the TLD count per population is quite misleading as it does not account for multiple domain ownership and, most importantly, it does not account for actual usage. Less than 30% of domains in most of the TLDs would have actively developed websites. Most domains either have holding (coming soon) pages or are parked with Pay Per Click advertising.

I guess they're just not early adopters to the ideas of others.
Actually they are far ahead in some respects. There are more .DE domains than German registered .COM domains. The same goes for the UK (approx 10M) and even Ireland (approx 207K). The US has its .US ccTLD but it only has about 1.7M domains. This is due to low acceptance, low visibility and very poor marketing.
 

Count Bobulescu

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#19
jmcc said:
One of the more clueless "metrics" that registries promote is the number of domains per thousand of population. It gives  a very misleading view.

No. That number is wrong. There was not 300M  .COM domains worldwide. Even the current count is about 121.7 M active. Of the number of active .COM domain names, the US would have approximately 58%. (Will check % later today.) The percentage of US hosted and registered .COM domains would be slightly higher.

As a metric, the TLD count per population is quite misleading as it does not account for multiple domain ownership and, most importantly, it does not account for actual usage. Less than 30% of domains in most of the TLDs would have actively developed websites. Most domains either have holding (coming soon) pages or are parked with Pay Per Click advertising.

Actually they are far ahead in some respects. There are more .DE domains than German registered .COM domains. The same goes for the UK (approx 10M) and even Ireland (approx 207K). The US has its .US ccTLD but it only has about 1.7M domains. This is due to low acceptance, low visibility and very poor marketing.
296 M total TLD's. Well maybe I was a little bit right...... :D  

http://domaingang.com/domain-news/verisign-to-amend-latest-report-on-296-million-domains/
 
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#20
Peppermint said:
I bow to to your superior knowledge on this subject.
But I still believe a .com address is more useful than a .ie
If you are targeting a global market yes. If you are targeting an Irish market, no.

And you may dislike google, but it is the search engine most people use, I like duckduckgo but that's a minority sport..
Google has been turned into a pay per click search engine.

I spend lots of time looking for companies in European countries to do what I currently pay faceless people in China to do.
How do you, as a professional, suggest I find the companies I need locally?
All suggestions are welcome..
Linkedin, Facebook and then the local trade associations. You could also use the dominant search engine in each country.