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Should Fluent English agus Cúpla Focail Gaeilge be required to get at the goodies of the State ?

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Access to Stuff like :

-Social welfare
- accelerated access to medical services
- social housing
- access to housing-purchase finance
- fast-track careers in the public service
- driving licence applications ( the language of our road-signs matters )
- access to Govt. funded contracts by professional service firms (Construction, Accounting, Legal , IT providers )
- cheap passports/car tax/public transport
- Seats in Seanad Eireann.( a quota for Gaeilgeoir's )
- Jobs at Bord Failte, tour guiding, the GAA, or any other culturally sensitive employment
- Pension entitlements
- Apprenticeships for school leavers
- Getting designated a market stall in places like Moore Street or other public street markets.
- preferential parking bays for those with a Gaeilge badge in their car
- Taxi driver licensing
- preferential hourly pay for working with kids/the elderly or any State funded work.
- Permits to operate a bar/restaurant/fast food or other licensed premises
- Preferential quota's for senior jobs (akin to female jobs quota's )

English and Irish are our 2 main legal languages, after all ? But you wouldn't know it in some high-profile areas.

We now have a Russian man who is professor of irish working in a Gaeltacht area. He has invested in this society and culture. And good luck to him.

This transcends questions of race and religion. RTE seems to employ gaeilgeors of all colours and creeds, fair enough.

But a Russian becoming an irish professor is not the issue here. The basics of Irish at the level of a primary school kid is probably enough. Enough to weed out those who can only take, take, take from those who may be willing to give something back to our culture ? To show how soft we have become, are we giving irish passports to drum-banging Loyalist fanatics from Ulster ? Are we spending our hard-earned tax money on individuals who, until recently, could barely find Ireland on a map ?

Most other countries in the World require you to get with their language, except for the crazy countries.

what say you ? A chairde ?

Surge in northern unionists applying for Irish passport down to scare stories: DUP

Edit : To be allowed drive a black cab in London you must pass the exam called 'The Knowledge'...ie to know every street in the City. The test is not because you will need to know the streets, but IT IS to keep access to this lucrative work limited to Londoners ( or people with a strong tie to London ).

A basic knowledge of irish will help us allocate our Irish resources to irish people ( native-born or naturalised like our Russian Professor ).
 
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O

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Access to Stuff like :

-Social welfare
- accelerated access to medical services
- social housing
- access to housing-purchase finance
- fast-track careers in the public service
- driving licence applications ( the language of our road-signs matters )
- access to Govt. funded contracts by professional service firms (Construction, Accounting, Legal , IT providers )
- cheap passports/car tax/public transport
- Pension entitlements
- Apprenticeships for school leavers
- Preferential quota's for senior jobs (akin to female jobs quota's )

English and Irish are our 2 main legal languages, after all ? But you wouldn't know it in some high-profile areas.

We now have a Russian professor of irish working in a Gaeltacht area. He has invested in this society and culture. And good luck to him.

what say you ?
Brilliant idea!
 

TW Tone

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For years I have been pointing out that people can become Irish citizens without being able to speak or read either of the languages of the state.

The notion of citizenship goes back to the Greeks, for whom a citizen was a free man, a person able to take part in the discourse of society and shape its laws.
In that definition, the Irish state is farcically delinquent, since it gives citizenship to people who do not know English. They can never participate in our society--perhaps just as well since they can't read a newspaper or watch a TV news program. Because our university departments are derelict in doing research on Mass Immigration, I do not have figures on this. But a few years back an Egyptian neighbor of mine was a man who had been granted citizenship along with his wife (He was on the dole--imported as a slaughterhouse worker, lost his job and the obligation to sustain him for the rest of his life was passed onto me and other taxpayers. We lived near to each other. I was paying a mortgage, I and other taxpapters were paying for this guy's free housing--what's not to like about Mass Immigration?)

This man's English was poor, but he had enough to survive in society. His wife, however, also a citizen, had no English. She spent her days watching Arabic TV stations on satellite.

I am sure there are many cases such as this, especially among Muslim migrants and those from the Horn of Africa.
There is even a ruling of the Dept of Justice that women (how do we know?) can take the Oath of Allegiance in the Irish Citizenship ceremony while wearing a hood and face mask (Gemma O Doherty, please draw attention to this).

I do not think I would insist on any Irish language ability among migrants, though it is striking that for the first time in the history of the state we now have many Irish citizens who would not even know what Go Raibh Maith Agat means, or be able to count to ten in Irish. The fantasy world Irish language crowd, fanatically pro Mass Immigration, never seem to think of the implications of this.

As I said, I believe there should be a language requirement for Irish citizenship--the useless lazy Flanagan won't introduce it however. I would let the candidate pick which language he wished to show ability in. 99.9% would choose English. Any rare case who wished to present in Irish should be fastracked, and perhaps have the fee waived.
 
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O

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For years I have been pointing out that people can become Irish citizens without being able to speak or read either of the languages of the state.

The notion of citizenship goes back to the Greeks, for whom a citizen was a free man, a person able to take part in the discourse of society and shape its laws.
In that definition, the Irish state is farcically delinquent, since it gives citizenship to people who do not know English. They can never participate in our society--perhaps just as well sine they can't read a newspaper or watch a TV news program. Because our university departments are derelict in doing research on Mass Immigration, I do not have figures on this. But a few years back an Egyptian neighbor of mine was a man who had been granted citizenship along with his wife (He was on the dole--imported as a slaughterhouse worker, lost his job and the obligation to sustain him for the rest of his life was passed onto the taxpayer). This man's English was poor, but he had enough to survive in society. His wife, however, also a citizen, had no English. She spent her days watching Arabic TV stations on satellite.

I am sure there are many cases such as this, especially among Muslin migrants and those from the Horn of Afirca.
There is even a ruling of the Dept of Justice that women (how do we know?) can take the Oath of Allegiance in the Irish Citizenship ceremony while wearing a hood and face mask

I do not think I would insist on any Irish language ability among migrants, though it is striking that for the first time in the history of the state we now have many Irish citizens who wold not even know what Go Raibh Maith Agat means, or be able to count to ten in Irish. The fantasy world Irish language crowd, usually fanatically pro Mass Immigration, never seem to think of the implications of this.

As I said, I believe there should be a language requirement for Irish citizenshp--the useless lazy Flanagan won't introduce it however. I wuld let the candidaate pick which language he wished to show ability in. 99.9% would chose English. Any rare case who wished to present in Irish should be fastracked, perhaps have the fee waived.
The IELTS exam should be mandatory like in the uk
 
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So, the agreement in Ulster will point at Gaeilge getting a slightly better status ? Gaeilge less official in the North than in the 26 counties, but certainly it is a step go Cheart.

The 6 counties will no longer be such a cold-house for Gaeilgeoirs.
 
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There are other EFL exams. What's so sacrosanct about that one?
Ireland ought to devise its own English and Irish exams. A pass on on one or the other being necessary for citizenship.
considering the Billion odd that have English. I would set the bar slightly higher than that. At least 500 words of irish could be achieved without breaking a sweat.

don't believe me ? spend a week's holiday in a country with a language unfamiliar to yourself. Say, Slovenia or Latvia. Its easy to pick up a few words, often without even trying.
 

TW Tone

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considering the Billion odd that have English. I would set the bar slightly higher than that. At least 500 words of irish could be achieved without breaking a sweat.

don't believe me ? spend a week's holiday in a country with a language unfamiliar to yourself. Say, Slovenia or Latvia. Its easy to pick up a few words, often without even trying.

Perhaps it was my fault, but I spent two months in St Petersburg more than 20 years ago, and I doubt I learned 500 words of Russian. I certainly don't remember 500 now.
Perhaps my problem was that a lot of the very beautiful young ladies of that city wanted to practice English with me. Their common goal was to get out of the disaster that was Drunken Yeltsin's Russia.
 
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DrPat2

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Access to Stuff like :

-Social welfare
- accelerated access to medical services
- social housing
- access to housing-purchase finance
- fast-track careers in the public service
- driving licence applications ( the language of our road-signs matters )
- access to Govt. funded contracts by professional service firms (Construction, Accounting, Legal , IT providers )
- cheap passports/car tax/public transport
- Pension entitlements
- Apprenticeships for school leavers
- Getting designated a market stall in places like Moore Street or other public street markets.
- preferential parking bays for those with a Gaeilge badge in their car
- Taxi driver licensing
- preferential hourly pay for working with kids/the elderly or any State funded work.
- Permits to operate a bar/restaurant/fast food or other licensed premises
- Preferential quota's for senior jobs (akin to female jobs quota's )

English and Irish are our 2 main legal languages, after all ? But you wouldn't know it in some high-profile areas.

We now have a Russian professor of irish working in a Gaeltacht area. He has invested in this society and culture. And good luck to him.

This transcends questions of race and religion. RTE seems to employ gaeilgeors of all colours and creeds, fair enough.

But a Russian becoming an irish professor is not the issue here. The basics of Irish at the level of a primary school kid is probably enough. Enough to weed out those who can only take, take, take from those who may be willing to give something back to our culture ? To show how soft we have become, are we giving irish passports to drum-banging Loyalist fanatics from Ulster ? Are we spending our hard-earned tax money on individuals who, until recently, could barely find Ireland on a map ?

Most other countries in the World require you to get with their language, except for the crazy countries.

what say you ? A chairde ?

Surge in northern unionists applying for Irish passport down to scare stories: DUP
I agree that there should be legal requirements for those qualifying for citizenship to speak English and a modicum of Irish.

This would ensure those acquiring citizenship have a better chance of integration and would incentivise ongoing renewal of Irish as a living language. It would also give a kick up the backside to indigenous Irish who pay lip service to the language but couldn't be bothered to speak it as they would be shamed and embarrassed by newbies speaking Irish.

It would also encourage those of the Unionist tradition to explore their involvement with the language which has been substantial.

It would also put it up to the Southern home rule lot who are dismissive of anything that identifies them as distinctly Irish rather than primarily European or people living on a mere extension of our neighbouring island.

And the multicultists and their globalist backers would be on fairly weak ground in opposing such requirements.
 
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congress_tart

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Every child under 6 that comes into this country gets free GP care. A married couple with one working gets child benefit,more than many working in many eu countries.
Tens of thousands of non Irish Nationals "work" but are entitled to be paid fis, housing assistance payments, casual 3 day week payments and all the goodies that go with it.
I see everyday a lot of young Eastern Europeans getting grants and have medical cards too.

It is disgusting.
The entire eu experiment needs to be torn down.
 

BSA

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Every child under 6 that comes into this country gets free GP care. A married couple with one working gets child benefit,more than many working in many eu countries.
Tens of thousands of non Irish Nationals "work" but are entitled to be paid fis, housing assistance payments, casual 3 day week payments and all the goodies that go with it.
I see everyday a lot of young Eastern Europeans getting grants and have medical cards too.

It is disgusting.
The entire eu experiment needs to be torn down.
Exactly..!

And the fuc#€&g looney thing is none of those fab 'benefits' are available to working taxpayers... when they are really needed.. that's been my experience...

After an uninterrupted 30 years of working and taxpaying I was laid off a short few years ago... After a year of pay cuts and short time working which cleaned out every cent I possessed. It was the most frightening experience of my adult life.. Only for my wife's foresight with a savings account, help from my 85 year old father and a mortgage payment insurance policy I had luckily not canceled I would be homeless... Fact!!!

How dare our clown government shit heads act like Lady Bountiful to the third world and Eastern Europeans when they won't provide services people have paid for...

As I've posted several times nothing... nothing!!!.. Months of delays before €100 was slowly counted out ..months of further delays for another small sum... endless forms and questions, always 'problems we'll have to look into before we can make a decision'... .no medical card for me... 'are you looking for work daily?'.. unhelpful surly staff... 'if you're getting stroppy now we'll call security'.. As one of them said after the ninth week without any help.. I felt like I was in a nightmare..

This is the reality of the African and East European welfare paradise that is Ireland..anyone Irish working person here had a different experience?? I doubt it.. Stay healthy and stay employed... That's Ireland's version of the Welfare Safety `Net...

Our traitors are relying on the uniquely Irish trait of being ashamed when you are short of money to protect them.. One downturn will end that...
 
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