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Should Dead Lads be sitting at their own Wake.

Dan Óg

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#1
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnSGnN1kYag



I realised a long time ago that I was well suited to attending wakes. I dress my best, such as that is, and put a bit of thought into what I say to the grieving. None of this sorry for your loss stuff and shuffling by for me. I engage in conversation. Unless the person dies younger than hoped for, I enjoy going to wakes.

So I am happy to see this new trend. I especially like the eyes to be open. What does everyone think of this new style wake and would it not fit the Irish culture very well. An old farmer could be positioned picking spuds or shearing a sheep for example. A woman could be shown knitting a cap. Surely down in Clare, a musician could be propped up playing a fiddle with the audio piped in. Maybe have a few dancers. The possibilities are endless. It certainly would make for a more pleasant experience. Seeing a lad in a box is a bit depressing for many.
A fellow to be cremated could be sat close to an open fire. Some of ye could be stuck in front of a computer, to reflect your life.

What do ye think
 

IrishPaddy

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#2
Seen this earlier, couldn't believe it. Its some mad crazy shit alright.

I watched a documentary once about African culture. it appears in some areas they do something similar, the lay out the body at the persons home for 2-3 days in a similar fashion. Dressed in their best and sat down in a chair.

All their friends and family come to see them.

I can only imagine the smell, the gas releases, and the rotting flesh must be stomach turning, especially in the heat of that continent.

It must be the same for this lad, surely the body starts to smell and how the hell do they get him back into a coffin, Rigamortis must have well set in.

And they wonder how disease is spread?
 
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Dan Óg

Dan Óg

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#3
I can only imagine the smell, the gas releases, and the rotting flesh must be stomach turning, especially in the heat of that continent.

I

Exactly, and after a few days the dead lad would begin to smell as well
 
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#4
That gives an entire new meaning to the Bob Dylan song Joey when he says, ''He ain't dead, he's just asleep''


The Apache believe that the souls of the dead wander the earth if they are not buried by their own blood. Blood being thicker than water, I think it's sick the way the Americans have refused to give his body back to his descendants. Ireland is the only other country I'm aware of that paralells the practice of keeping the bodies of Prisoners-Of-War.


I honestly can't see stuffed bodies trending during the current economic crisis in Ireland, and the traditional wake has gone out of fashion in working class Ireland, as most people can't afford the cost of the funeral. A young person from my community died a couple of years ago, and his family inherited his drug debt, but if you read enough of the tabloid nonsense that passes for journalism, you would get the impression that the working class have been living-it-large, like the gangsters and the politicians. I think cremations are the way to go for the working class, and the lumpen proletariat, although I accept it's unfair on the traditionalist's, who want to keep the old ways alive, and the bagpiper's and fiddlers are out-of-pocket as a result. Cute hoorism is alive and well in Ireland, and the possibilities are endless as you say, to exploit a families grief.
 

Madam

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#5
Looking at the face of the young dead man and its clear there is no life in him.

Its resembles more of a mannequin or waxwork.

But is it really any different than the body lying down in a coffin?