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Seán Ó hÉinirí: Scéalta Chois Cladaigh - Last of the Monoglot Irish Speakers

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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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The first ten or twenty lines or so of the OP would be wonderful, a chara, da mba mhaith leat e. Go raibh mile maith agat.

I see that Zosimus has found the whole lot translated.

 
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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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This blog is full of transcriptions from Seán Ó hÉinirí:


In my experience the best way to memorise texts is this method, combined with spaced repetition and the method of loci:



Excellent.
 

The Field Marshal

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More diddly I dum BBC warping of real Irish culture helped by willing Irish tools.

The old geezer in the clip learnt these Homeric tales as he says himself when he was 12.
Many teachers in Irish National schools at the start of the 20th cent taught Homer. This man clearly learned this stuff at school.

The Irish translator fails to tell the BBC interviewer this pivotal fact.



Nothing new to see here other than a cute hoor shake down of gullible BBC fools and those who promote their delusional bilge .
 
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OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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More diddly I dum BBC warping of real Irish culture helped by willing Irish tools.

The old geezer in the clip learnt these Homeric tales as he says himself when he was 12.
Obviously at school.

The Irish translator fails to tell the BBC interviewer this pivotal fact.

Many teachers in Irish National schools taught Homer.

Nothing new to see here other than a cute hoor shake down of gullible BBC fools and those who promote their bilge .


He's not reciting Homer, you illiterate.
 
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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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I didn’t say he was reciting Homer , you moron.

The old geezer in the clip learnt these Homeric tales as he says himself when he was 12.
Obviously at school. Many teachers in Irish National schools taught Homer. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

The Field Marshal

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.The OP illustrates the naive gullibility of people who know zero about life in the Irish Gaeltacht.

A man died 22 years ago and now a poorly sourced op thinks and believes he could only speak one language.

Personally I don’t believe a single word of it as everybody in the Irish Gaeltacht areas at the end of the last century had at least a smattering of English words and ability to speak in that language.
 
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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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.The OP illustrates the naive gullibility of people who know zero about life in the Irish Gaeltacht.

A man died 22 years ago and now a poorly sourced op thinks and believes he could only speak one language.

Personally I don’t believe a single word of it as everybody in the Irish Gaeltacht areas at the end of the last century had at least a smattering of English words and ability to speak in that language.


Well, you believe very funny things. So what you don't believe is equally bizarre and amusing.
 

Zosimus

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More diddly I dum BBC warping of real Irish culture helped by willing Irish tools.

The old geezer in the clip learnt these Homeric tales as he says himself when he was 12.
Many teachers in Irish National schools at the start of the 20th cent taught Homer. This man clearly learned this stuff at school.

The Irish translator fails to tell the BBC interviewer this pivotal fact.



Nothing new to see here other than a cute hoor shake down of gullible BBC fools and those who promote their bilge .

What's the significance of learning a story at the age of twelve? Do you think it was standard for Irish students to memorise tens of thousands of lines of stories in Irish at the time that man was young? Even if he did learn his tales from a teacher rather than from his parents or a village seanchaí, what would that imply? The hedge school teachers are almost certianly responsible for keeping much old Irish prose and verse alive in the folk tradition. Is your complaint that he didn't learn these stories directly from fairies?

Reading about the history of the state's Irish language policy has done more than anything else to make me feel that is illegitimate. Fine Gael has damaged my pride in my Old English ancestry, and also my esteem for the Normans as a race. In most places the Normans sent over only their lords and ladies but it seems here they sent over their gombeenish hick serfs too.
 

roc_

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This blog is full of transcriptions from Seán Ó hÉinirí:


In my experience the best way to memorise texts is this method, combined with spaced repetition and the method of loci:

Thank you Zozimus, that's brilliant.

But I'm really after those verses in the OP video. Are they there in your link? I can't find them.

I'm really interested in how in the language and structure of these type of epic "Homeric" recitals there is this technique of composition, basically a vast storehouse of formulaic phrases ("swiftfooted Achilles"...) and even entire formulaic lines ("the Lord sends the food, the devil sends the cook"... etc.) to ensure the recall of the epic recital.

The way they're metrically correct and positionally predictable. Like the way a musician remembers and recalls a chord or a melodic line. It's all metric and versified speech, and there's melody too, as you can hear in Sean's voice in the OP. I am really interested in what I think I hear in that particular video.

The link you gave about memorising is great. But I remember when I was a young boy I met this ancient wrinkled woman while visiting relatives in Connemara, and she told me while walking along the road about how the "old places", like Newgrange and Knowth were actually for remembering old stories using the stars. Basically you map "topics" on stars and clusters of stars and when you want to remember you watch the unfolding of the constellations to get the sequence, there is a kind of cross-mapping of epic stories onto the stars, and that is how the remembering is done in the old way.

The other thing that fascinates me about Irish is the expression of the relation of things. How people and everything in the world relate to each other, and to spirit. I seem to discern a movement of spirit in the old way of speaking, and of course there is no word in Irish for "to have" and so on.

It seems to me that it is the English language that underlies all these materialistic relations we have these days, this idea of cash payment being the most important relation of human beings, the philosophy that it is always right to put labour, land and other natural resources on the open market where they can be bought and sold for payment etc.

Whereas what of reciprocity, exchange and redistribution, the sharing out of labour, the family and community unit etc? I think there is a much stronger philosophical basis for it in the Irish language, well as long as we don't turn it into something near English, which is what the current tendency seems to be, I'm sorry to see.
 

The Field Marshal

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Gentle Warning stop the baiting, trolling, derailing please. address the OP topic. Play the ball not the player
Thank you Zozimus, that's brilliant.

But I'm really after those verses in the OP video. Are they there in your link? I can't find them.

I'm really interested in how in the language and structure of these type of epic "Homeric" recitals there is this technique of composition, basically a vast storehouse of formulaic phrases ("swiftfooted Achilles"...) and even entire formulaic lines ("the Lord sends the food, the devil sends the cook"... etc.) to ensure the recall of the epic recital.

The way they're metrically correct and positionally predictable. Like the way a musician remembers and recalls a chord or a melodic line. It's all metric and versified speech, and there's melody too, as you can hear in Sean's voice in the OP. I am really interested in what I think I hear in that particular video.

The link you gave about memorising is great. But I remember when I was a young boy I met this ancient wrinkled woman while visiting relatives in Connemara, and she told me while walking along the road about how the "old places", like Newgrange and Knowth were actually for remembering old stories using the stars. Basically you map "topics" on stars and clusters of stars and when you want to remember you watch the unfolding of the constellations to get the sequence, there is a kind of cross-mapping of epic stories onto the stars, and that is how the remembering is done in the old way.

The other thing that fascinates me about Irish is the expression of the relation of things. How people and everything in the world relate to each other, and to spirit. I seem to discern a movement of spirit in the old way of speaking, and of course there is no word in Irish for "to have" and so on.

It seems to me that it is the English language that underlies all these materialistic relations we have these days, this idea of cash payment being the most important relation of human beings, the philosophy that it is always right to put labour, land and other natural resources on the open market where they can be bought and sold for payment etc.

Whereas what of reciprocity, exchange and redistribution, the sharing out of labour, the family and community unit etc? I think there is a much stronger philosophical basis for it in the Irish language, well as long as we don't turn it into something near English, which is what the current tendency seems to be, I'm sorry to see.
Just more Marxist rubbish posturing as ye ancient Gaelic history.

Your waffle discredits and insults all genuine Irish people.
 
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