Saint Oliver Plunkett

Son_of_Tuathal

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His feast day was very recent:

On July 1st 1681 Oliver Plunkett, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland, was the last and most famous in a series of Irish martyrs executed for their faith by the English crown.

When the Roman Catholic Church canonized him on October 12th 1975, he was the first Irishman granted sainthood in almost 700 years. It was an honour that he had paid for dearly - with a perilous existence, strong civil resistance to anti-Catholic fervour and the most gruesome martyrdom imaginable.
Oliver Plunkett was born into a wealthy and influential Anglo-Norman Catholic family at Loughcrew, near Oldcastle, in County Meath on November 1st 1625. Amongst others, his family had connections with the Earls of Finglas and Roscommon, Lord Dunsany and Lord Louth. When he was 16, Oliver was sent to Rome (rather than England, where Intolerance Laws against Catholics were being passed) to continue his studies. After studying at the Irish College in Rome, Oliver was ordained in 1654.
St. Oliver Plunkett
 

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That hang draw and quarter thing was extremely nasty. I believe if you were lucky you could bribe the executioner to hang you properly so that you weren't around--mentally--for the drawing and quartering. A bottle of strong booze might have helped too, tho I think nothing would sober you up as quickly as seeing the executioner waiting for you with noose and knife as you approached the scaffold. The drawing included castration, of course. I don't think the quartering was of much concern, you were long gone by then.

I seem to remember that the Fat Rat Henry VIII had a poor young guy h d and q'd. The 'crime' was that he had had sex with Catherine Howard BEFORE she married the Fat Rat. There may have been religious stuff going on too, the Howards were suspected of loyalty to the Old Faith. Henry usually commuted the sentence to just plain old hanging, but the bastard did not in this case. The tradition was that the poor boy's screams could be heard miles away. I hope God dealt with him more mercifully than He did with Henry Bag of Putrid Lard.

As a teenager several decades ago I read about the execution of Francois Damiens. He had been accused of trying to kill some French king, Louis XV I imagine. The description of the tortures inflicted on that poor man stayed with me for years. I saw how thin is the veneer of human courtesy and civility--the same society which carried out that execution valued itself as modern and civilized.

Our own Guilermo Lamport of Waterford was sentenced to be burned alive by the Mexican Inquisition. He apparently avoided that fate by jumping off the scaffold with the noose around his neck, thereby killing himself instantly.
 

Karloff

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That hang draw and quarter thing was extremely nasty. I believe if you were lucky you could bribe the executioner to hang you properly so that you weren't around--mentally--for the drawing and quartering. A bottle of strong booze might have helped too, tho I think nothing would sober you up as quickly as seeing the executioner waiting for you with noose and knife as you approached the scaffold. The drawing included castration, of course. I don't think the quartering was of much concern, you were long gone by then.

I seem to remember that the Fat Rat Henry VIII had a poor young guy h d and q'd. The 'crime' was that he had had sex with Catherine Howard BEFORE she married the Fat Rat. There may have been religious stuff going on too, the Howards were suspected of loyalty to the Old Faith. Henry usually commuted the sentence to just plain old hanging, but the bastard did not in this case. The tradition was that the poor boy's screams could be heard miles away. I hope God dealt with him more mercifully than He did with Henry Bag of Putrid Lard.

As a teenager several decades ago I read about the execution of Francois Damiens. He had been accused of trying to kill some French king, Louis XV I imagine. The description of the tortures inflicted on that poor man stayed with me for years. I saw how thin is the veneer of human courtesy and civility--the same society which carried out that execution valued itself as modern and civilized.

Our own Guilermo Lamport of Waterford was sentenced to be burned alive by the Mexican Inquisition. He apparently avoided that fate by jumping off the scaffold with the noose around his neck, thereby killing himself instantly.
Executions like that of the regicides Damiens and Ravaillac contributed to the sentiment of the French Revolution. Ravaillac is considered in some quarters to be an anti masonic Catholic hero as it is believed Herny IV would have steered France down the Masonic crypto-Protestant path and perhaps even along the route taken by Henry VIII of England.

In English Drawing and Quarterings they would sometimes pull out the intestines of the victims and burn them (with nerves attached) in front of the victim.
 
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