• Before posting anything about the COVID-19 virus, please read this first Click Here

Súil amháin ar an mbóthar - One eye on the road

OP
Antóin Mac Comháin

Antóin Mac Comháin

Deported
PI Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,193
Likes
1,006
Location
Ireland
Traveller culture ‘on verge of extinction’


Scottish travellers in the 1950s.

AN ANCIENT Scottish culture dating back at least 16 centuries is about to die out, according to a renowned Highland gypsy. Essie Stewart, 73, who was born into a Sutherland travelling family, believes modern-day travellers are giving her forebears a bad name, particularly by becoming involved in criminal activity.

Stewart, a Gaelic storyteller with a strong grounding in traveller tradition, has become famous for her telling of legends, Celtic stories and epics, as well humorous tales handed down from her gypsy grandfather in both English and Gaelic. Her grandfather was one of the greatest Gaelic storytellers of them all – Allidh Dall Stewart, a tinsmith, piper, soldier and singer, who died in 1968. She said:

“It is a culture and a life that is fast disappearing.

Some of our heritage can be traced back to the 5th century.

‘Today’s travellers give themselves – and past ones – a bad name’

“Our history has not been told in this manner before. But the travelling community today is not what it was.

“I don’t recognise today’s travellers. I don’t know who they are, and I don’t want to know who they are. They not only give themselves a bad name, but they give historical travellers a bad name.”

In Gaelic, the travellers were known as the “Ceardannan”, the Black Tinkers, and recognised as a tribe, separate to the settled population. In ancient times there was a caste of itinerant metal–workers. One of the trades associated with them from early times was that of tinsmith, and it is clear that to primitive man the ability to use metals seemed very close to magic; consequently both “black” and “white” smiths for long enjoyed immense prestige, not only as craftsmen but also as wielders of secret powers.

- Traveller culture 'on verge of extinction' - The Scotsman

cathalbrugha In Scotland Beurla Reagaird, the Scottish equivelent of the Irish Shelta, the word God is spelt An Dhailean, and My God is spelt Mo Dhailean. Very similar to the Shelta word for "God", "Dhalun". Linguistic proof that Binchys suggestion that most of the words in Shelta are derived from a long lost pre-Gaelic language spoken here before the Celts arrived. Beurla Reagaird is spoken in the Northern Scottish Highlands, and is totally different to the Romany Cant used in the southern half of Scotland. Beurla Reagaird is only spoken within Gaelic-speaking areas, or rather Gaelic-speaking groups, as those who spoke the lingo were poets, horse-traders, craftsmen and news-bringers.

Wascurito This is an interesting and pretty unique thread. It's being ruined by one individual. This is not "a thread about language and what constitutes a language". It's a thread about Shelta. :rolleyes:
 
OP
Antóin Mac Comháin

Antóin Mac Comháin

Deported
PI Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,193
Likes
1,006
Location
Ireland
Wascurito PLEASE. START. A. DIFFERENT. THREAD. This thread has nothing to do with Ulster Scots or Scots Gaelic. I've reported the above post to the moderators.

I have altered the spelling of Michif, in the sample dictionary above to Canadian Gaelic-Michi, because that is what it is. As a matter of fact, everybody I have asked so far, identified 'Caimmer hah shui ndiuth' as Irish.

Then there is the Galician question. We know from the word Bardoi in Galatian, that at the time of Christ, there were Bards outside of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Does Galician have a place beside the other Celtic languages? What is the difference between Cant and Cantashes? Are we back in Michi territory again? I'm only guessing, but Cantashes could very easily translate as Cant-a-Chi: Singer who sees.

Antóin Mac Comháin Oh, starais an rainn luisearachd. Is sgiomaideach gramaidach iad uilig - Oh, he has been drinking. They are all drunken fools -


Antóin Mac Comháin As far as I'm aware, the last of the fluent Sutherland Gaelic speakers have died since that video was made. With that died the linguistic connection between East Scotland and the Land Clearances. Íoc is a much sexier way of saying Péithiudh for, and over the long haul, the former will out live the use of the latter, but because the dialect has been recorded it can be revived, and that particular dialect is the one that will come most naturally to the pupils of the future, and it is a very distinct dialect, with approximately 30% of the language loanwords, with Ulster Scots accounting for more words than any other language.

A) Graw bi greydid, sheydi laadu - Old Shelta
B) Let's turry to the norch where your jeel cradgies - Modern Shelta

C) Go dtaga do ríocht, Go ndéantar do thoil - Irish
D) Did do toil i talmain - Old Irish
E) Dèanar do thoil air an talamh - Scottish Gaelic
F) Dt'aigney dy row jeant er y thalloo - Manx
G) Dèanar do thoil air an talamh - Old Manx

H) Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done

Which dialect between C and G, do you think is most compatible with A and B?


Old Mr Grouser Fine, but why not start a thread on that? This thread is supposed to be about Shelta.

Na Gramaidí, na Gramaidí, na Gramaidí - The Fools, the Fools, the Fools :rolleyes:

Mo Dhailean, Mo Dhailean
Dearc an suaillean alainn,
Mo Dhailean, Mo Dhailean
Bagail chaim an sgaoi

My God, My God
Look at the beautiful child,
My God, My God
Going down to the river
 
OP
Antóin Mac Comháin

Antóin Mac Comháin

Deported
PI Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,193
Likes
1,006
Location
Ireland
The Native Americans and the Gaels - Na Tùsanaich is na Gàidheil

Margaret Bennett - Oran nam Mogaisean

Òran nam Mogaisean - The Mocassins Song

The Gaels who emigrated to Canada lived alongside the native peoples of the First Nations. In Nova Scotia, evidence shows that the native Mi’kmaq people and the Gaels had an effect on one another. The Gaels picked up new words from the languages which surrounded them.

‘Òran nam Mogaisean’ was composed by Murchadh MacArtair, after he learned about moccasins from his Mi’kmaq neighbours in Newfoundland. Moccasins are leather shoes and the word ‘moccasin’ is a native word meaning ‘shoe’. - A new life in Canada

Tha fonn, fonn, fonn air,
Tha fonn air na mogaisean,
Tha fonn gun bhith trom,
Hog i ó air na mogaisean.

Thòisich Seumas Ryan
’s rinn e craiceann do mhogaisean
Gun chairt e dhiubh na h-adhbhrainn
’s cha robh iad craobhadh fhathast air.

Thèid mi sìos don aifhrionn
an coibhneas nan caileagan,
Cha ghabh iad facal ùrnaigh
Ach sùil air mo mhogaisean.

Translation:

Let’s sing, sing, sing,
Let’s sing about the moccasins,
Our sing won’t be heavy,
Hokey-ho for the moccasins.

James Ryan got started,
with a piece of hide for the moccasins,
Although he tanned the ankle leather,
They weren’t yet soft enough.

When I go down to mass,
In the company of the lasses,
They can’t say a word of prayer,
For staring at my moccasins.

- An Drochaid Eadarainn
''The Europeans, in turn, used other forms of latex derived from trees for waterproofing, most notably rubber, and the word gum was also used for rubber and its compounds. The DC, for example, gives gumboot "a rubber boot reaching to just below the knee", an item that the British would call a Wellington, after the great general of the Napoleonic wars. Whether the Cree term pikiwaskisin is a calque on the Canadian term gumboot, or an aboriginal comment on the waterproof quality of a galosh or rubber boot, it would be hard to tell. The word is transparent, however, since the deverbal -askisin relates to the full noun maskisin, cognate with Ojibwa makkisin, the word that has been borrowed into English as moccasin. A pikiwaskisin is not an "incense shoe" but an overshoe or rubber boot, a gumboot or gum-shoe, and a reference to the waterproofing quality of gum which was known to the Indians long before the coming of the Europeans.'' - Canadian English: A Linguistic Reader - Queen's University

The Highlanders of Portage la Prairie | Political Irish - Backgrounds of the Dialect Called Bungi

As Margaret Bennett points out, the word Moccasins came from Gaelic, and literally means My Feet.
 
Top Bottom