RTÉ promotes rejected asylum seeker and Social Democrat candidate running for election in Dublin

Kershaw

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How in the name of feck can an asylum seeker be allowed vote and run for local elections, surely you’re taking the piss?
Ireland grants refugees and asylum seekers right to vote

By Steven O’Brien | 30 April 2004

>DUBLIN, Ireland, April 30 (UNHCR) - Refugees and asylum seekers in Ireland will be eligible to vote for the first time in local elections on June 11 this year, following uncertainty based on the lack of recognition of their identity documents.

>Until this week, refugees and asylum seekers had been barred from participating in local elections because the list of documents accepted as identity documents for voting failed to include the Temporary Registration Certificate (TRC) card that is carried by asylum seekers, or the Garda [Police] National Immigration Bureau (GNIB) card carried by refugees.

>However, the Irish Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government, Martin Cullen, announced this week new regulations extending the list of documents that are acceptable for the purpose of voting to include those held by refugees and asylum seekers.

>On April 27, the minister’s department stated: “When a person goes to vote, he may be asked for identification, and the inclusion of the TRC card and the GNIB card will ensure that asylum seekers and refugees who are registered on the register of electors will have appropriate identification documents available to them.”

>Under Irish electoral law, all voters must be “ordinarily resident” at an address and aged 18 years and above to be eligible to register as a voter. Subsequently, their citizenship defines the elections at which they are entitled to vote.

>Irish citizens are eligible to vote at all polls, EU citizens can vote at European and local elections, while non-nationals (other than EU citizens) can vote at local elections only.

Ireland grants refugees and asylum seekers right to vote
 

Murf13

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Ireland grants refugees and asylum seekers right to vote

By Steven O’Brien | 30 April 2004

>DUBLIN, Ireland, April 30 (UNHCR) - Refugees and asylum seekers in Ireland will be eligible to vote for the first time in local elections on June 11 this year, following uncertainty based on the lack of recognition of their identity documents.

>Until this week, refugees and asylum seekers had been barred from participating in local elections because the list of documents accepted as identity documents for voting failed to include the Temporary Registration Certificate (TRC) card that is carried by asylum seekers, or the Garda [Police] National Immigration Bureau (GNIB) card carried by refugees.

>However, the Irish Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government, Martin Cullen, announced this week new regulations extending the list of documents that are acceptable for the purpose of voting to include those held by refugees and asylum seekers.

>On April 27, the minister’s department stated: “When a person goes to vote, he may be asked for identification, and the inclusion of the TRC card and the GNIB card will ensure that asylum seekers and refugees who are registered on the register of electors will have appropriate identification documents available to them.”

>Under Irish electoral law, all voters must be “ordinarily resident” at an address and aged 18 years and above to be eligible to register as a voter. Subsequently, their citizenship defines the elections at which they are entitled to vote.

>Irish citizens are eligible to vote at all polls, EU citizens can vote at European and local elections, while non-nationals (other than EU citizens) can vote at local elections only.

Ireland grants refugees and asylum seekers right to vote
Oh, I believed you, believe me, nevertheless, thanks for the quote/link

However, my question was in fact rhetorical.
:-(
 

Kershaw

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Social Democrats candidate Ellie Kisyombe admits she failed her asylum claim and has been appealing



Social Democrats candidate Ellie Kisyombe who is running in the upcoming council elections in Dublin city has admitted to Matt Cooper that she has failed her asylum claim at least once but has been appealing the decision, as the media continues to promote her campaign to be elected as councillor.

Approximately 10% of all asylum claims have been granted in Ireland up until 2017 but according to the ESRI, 80% of deportation orders on failed asylum seekers are never implemented. When the IPO (International Protection Office) took over the asylum process in 2017 from ORAC, the percentage of applications approved jumped to 75% according to Eurostat.

Matt Cooper first asked her Why she wanted to be a city councillor. She replied:

"I think it's time. Actually with what I've done I feel like I've achieved so much by standing up and you know with the work that I've done. Also I've lived here thinking that I might not go to Malawi, going to live here so I'm a part of the community and the way the Irish communities decided that despite legally that I'm still in this system I've been embraced I feel this is home so I think despite the hard situation I feel like I've achieved a lot and I feel this is home so I think that's something that also makes me want to do what I'm doing at the moment."

Asked how can someone be in Direct Provision for a period of ten years, she answered:

"[Coughs] ehm, it's the system. I can't say why is that for me. I don't know. Maybe my mouth has contributed to that which is something that maybe is speculation but it's a very complicated system and that's how it ca..."

Kisyombe said she arrived in Ireland in 2010 or 2011.

Asked why she came to Ireland from Malawi she said:

"Ah, I didn't actually choose to come to Ireland like coming to Ireland but that was the easiest way for me to get here with the situation that I was in in Malawi and the people that were helping me to organise the journey at the time, Ireland was Malawi visa free and not only visa free but I was in a situation whereby I had to leave Malawi because I've lost many people in...some of my friend died so I could have died so it wasn't like going to Ireland, Germany or Switzerland but you know, it was Ireland but at that time I didn't know much of Republic. I knew much of Northern Ireland which because of the story of Northern Ireland but I didn't know much of Republic of Ireland but you know when you are looking for safety, I don't think you have a second guess or a second think about where you want to go as long as you get there."

Copper put it to her that he believed asylum seekers in the EU had to claim asylum in the first country they arrived in. She replied:

"So there is a flight straight to Ireland. The flight that I took, the first European country was Ireland. So the only stop-over was Ethiopia. So from Ethiopia you are in transit and the second country to arrive is Ireland."

However, there were no direct flights to Ireland from Ethiopia in 2010 or 2011 but Cooper did not question her further on this issue.

Asked why she had to leave Malawi, she said:

"I'm coming from a very strong political background. I myself have been involved into politics, activism and as you can see I've lived here, I'm a very opinionated person, you know so in Malawi actually it's a big problem and I could have lose life. People have lose life through that and at least I'm here in Ireland and I can continue to to talk and speak up and standing up for the things.... "

Cooper wondered when she thought she was going to leave Direct Provision and what has been happening that she hasn't had her status sorted out. She replied:

"I mean that's what I'm waiting for. No, I'm waiting for and I'm still going to be the person I am. I said I live through this moment. I don't know what's going on. I don't know what I'll get tomorrow but you know this is me...."

Cooper interrupted and asked her had she actually sat down for interviews with the Department of Justice. She responded:

"Yeah I have, I have sat down through interviews and my case is still ongoing so I can't talk much about that. I don't know what they're thinking but I'm here talking and they can listen..."

Cooper pressed her and asked had she at any stage been rejected and appealed or anything like that. She replied:

"Yeah, I have. Of course the first time I have rejected and then I appealed so you know it's now the waiting game so that's how it is."

"Also if I'm going to join Social Democrats, I think I'll be part of the solution so we sit down and make policies for people like me to not get stuck in this situation."

She says she left two children in Malawi when she came to Ireland but her daughter joined her four and a half years ago and her son three years ago. She said while her son was trying to get to Ireland he had to stay in a prison with adults.

Her daughter is in second year in college studying criminal law.

Broadcast: Today FM | 01 Jan 2019
 

Florence

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I had assumed she had brought her 2 children (twins) with her when she arrived 10 years ago. Why didn't she bring them on the flight? She didn't come on a dangerous journey on a dodgy boat so how could she leave two eight years olds alone in Malawi? She claims her family were in danger as political activists - leaving her children behind makes no sense.
 

FightingForTheBull

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She's genuinely not legally allowed to work because only asylum seekers who have been here for over nine months without being given a response to their application are allowed to work. She was given a response. She was rejected because otherwise she could work and so chose to stay probably appealing and appealing.
This bastard has likely cost the taxpayer close to 500'000.
 

George Dillon

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Social Democrats candidate Ellie Kisyombe admits she failed her asylum claim and has been appealing



Social Democrats candidate Ellie Kisyombe who is running in the upcoming council elections in Dublin city has admitted to Matt Cooper that she has failed her asylum claim at least once but has been appealing the decision, as the media continues to promote her campaign to be elected as councillor.

Approximately 10% of all asylum claims have been granted in Ireland up until 2017 but according to the ESRI, 80% of deportation orders on failed asylum seekers are never implemented. When the IPO (International Protection Office) took over the asylum process in 2017 from ORAC, the percentage of applications approved jumped to 75% according to Eurostat.

Matt Cooper first asked her Why she wanted to be a city councillor. She replied:

"I think it's time. Actually with what I've done I feel like I've achieved so much by standing up and you know with the work that I've done. Also I've lived here thinking that I might not go to Malawi, going to live here so I'm a part of the community and the way the Irish communities decided that despite legally that I'm still in this system I've been embraced I feel this is home so I think despite the hard situation I feel like I've achieved a lot and I feel this is home so I think that's something that also makes me want to do what I'm doing at the moment."

Asked how can someone be in Direct Provision for a period of ten years, she answered:

"[Coughs] ehm, it's the system. I can't say why is that for me. I don't know. Maybe my mouth has contributed to that which is something that maybe is speculation but it's a very complicated system and that's how it ca..."

Kisyombe said she arrived in Ireland in 2010 or 2011.

Asked why she came to Ireland from Malawi she said:

"Ah, I didn't actually choose to come to Ireland like coming to Ireland but that was the easiest way for me to get here with the situation that I was in in Malawi and the people that were helping me to organise the journey at the time, Ireland was Malawi visa free and not only visa free but I was in a situation whereby I had to leave Malawi because I've lost many people in...some of my friend died so I could have died so it wasn't like going to Ireland, Germany or Switzerland but you know, it was Ireland but at that time I didn't know much of Republic. I knew much of Northern Ireland which because of the story of Northern Ireland but I didn't know much of Republic of Ireland but you know when you are looking for safety, I don't think you have a second guess or a second think about where you want to go as long as you get there."

Copper put it to her that he believed asylum seekers in the EU had to claim asylum in the first country they arrived in. She replied:

"So there is a flight straight to Ireland. The flight that I took, the first European country was Ireland. So the only stop-over was Ethiopia. So from Ethiopia you are in transit and the second country to arrive is Ireland."

However, there were no direct flights to Ireland from Ethiopia in 2010 or 2011 but Cooper did not question her further on this issue.

Asked why she had to leave Malawi, she said:

"I'm coming from a very strong political background. I myself have been involved into politics, activism and as you can see I've lived here, I'm a very opinionated person, you know so in Malawi actually it's a big problem and I could have lose life. People have lose life through that and at least I'm here in Ireland and I can continue to to talk and speak up and standing up for the things.... "

Cooper wondered when she thought she was going to leave Direct Provision and what has been happening that she hasn't had her status sorted out. She replied:

"I mean that's what I'm waiting for. No, I'm waiting for and I'm still going to be the person I am. I said I live through this moment. I don't know what's going on. I don't know what I'll get tomorrow but you know this is me...."

Cooper interrupted and asked her had she actually sat down for interviews with the Department of Justice. She responded:

"Yeah I have, I have sat down through interviews and my case is still ongoing so I can't talk much about that. I don't know what they're thinking but I'm here talking and they can listen..."

Cooper pressed her and asked had she at any stage been rejected and appealed or anything like that. She replied:

"Yeah, I have. Of course the first time I have rejected and then I appealed so you know it's now the waiting game so that's how it is."

"Also if I'm going to join Social Democrats, I think I'll be part of the solution so we sit down and make policies for people like me to not get stuck in this situation."

She says she left two children in Malawi when she came to Ireland but her daughter joined her four and a half years ago and her son three years ago. She said while her son was trying to get to Ireland he had to stay in a prison with adults.

Her daughter is in second year in college studying criminal law.

Broadcast: Today FM | 01 Jan 2019

By Cooper's shoddy standards, it wasn't a bad interview.
 

Florence

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This lady is on the front cover of the irish Times Magazine and gets 3 pages inside including a full page picture. The article is also flagged on the front page of the newspaper with a small photo. The interviewer is Jennifer O'Connell.

Haven't had time to read properly and look forward to discussing this article with members who have a strong stomach and can read it all the way through.
 

Kershaw

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This lady is on the front cover of the irish Times Magazine and gets 3 pages inside including a full page picture. The article is also flagged on the front page of the newspaper with a small photo. The interviewer is Jennifer O'Connell.

Haven't had time to read properly and look forward to discussing this article with members who have a strong stomach and can read it all the way through.



little bit of accidental racism at the bottom there.
 
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