RTÉ promotes rejected asylum seeker and Social Democrat candidate running for election in Dublin

Kershaw

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RTÉ promotes rejected asylum seeker and Social Democrat candidate running for election in Dublin



RTÉ's Ray D'Arcy invited Ellie Kisyombe onto his show to discuss her candidacy for councillor in Dublin city (LE19) for the Social Democrats in the upcoming council elections in May.

Kisyombe says she fled from Malawi and has been living in Ireland's Direct Provision system for almost a decade.

Since 2004, asylum seekers in Ireland have been allowed to vote and run in local council elections. The first day they were allowed to vote was the same day the Irish public voted to remove birth right citizenship from the constitution as too many pregnant asylum seekers were flying into Dublin in order to gain citizenship for their children and maternity hospitals had begged the government to do something.

Kisyombe says it's good that she can run in council elections as that will be a start and "you never know what will happen next". She says she was born into a very political family in Malawi and lost many members of her family which was "some of the reason they made me flee there".

Fearing for her life

Ray asked were her whether her family members were killed to which she responded:

"I would use that word but unfortunately where I'm coming from feels like that. They can go years and years without you know being sorted out or even confirmation of that but definitely that's what really happened to my parents and uncle."

Asked whether she feared for her life, she replied:

"I did because I don't think if I was in Malawi, the way I am I think I'd be talking to you right now, Ray. I'm glad that I'm in Ireland."

Direct Provision:

Kisyombe told Ray when she first arrived in Ireland she was put into a reception centre and stayed there for four weeks before being moved into a Direct Provision centre.

Being told that there were now 39 Direct Provision centres in Ireland, she remarked:

"And there even more than that because I know that you know we've had a bit of troubles so I can't blame RIA (Reception & Integration Agency) on that. We've had a little bit of troubles so there other places that within they're not mentioned quite a lot because ah, [coughs] anyway, I don't even need to go there. I don't have facts but let's say there are 39 at the moment."

She said she was allowed €21.60 a week in Direct Provision but did not mention that this weekly allowance is set to rise in March March to €38.80 for adults and €29.80 for Children.

Eligibility to work:

She said that while someone is in Direct Provision they are not allowed to work, get education or cook.

Ray reminded her that asylum seekers are now allowed to work but Kisyombe said there were too many conditions and "people like me can't be allowed to work."

"I'm the odd system so that law doesn't apply me. I'm not really sure why not. It does not apply to me because I've stayed long time in Direct Provision".

Under new rules, asylum seekers are allowed to work in Ireland as long as they have been here for nine months without being given a decision on their application. If they are refused asylum, often they appeal the result continuously and remain in Direct Provision, unable to work legally.

Kisyombe said she had two 18 year old twins with one in third level education. She said a scholarship from the Irish Refugee Council funded the first year in college her friend councillor Gary Gannon helped to get her funding for the following year. She also gets some help for transport from the Social Welfare Dept.

On a campaign flyer, she describes herself as a chef and small business owner despite not being allowed to work.

Why her asylum case is taking so long:

Ray said that people would be interested to know why her asylum case is taking so long.

"In my situation...in our situation for people that we've been here for mostly a decade now, the time our case is too long. I'm not sure what's going on in there which maybe one day I might understand."

She said over the past eight years, she can't remember how many letters she got about her asylum case from the Dept of Justice and believes Ireland will look back on the Direct Provision system as a national embarrassment.

Ability to represent Dubliners:

She lives in a reception centre in Dundalk because she says they closed the apartments where she used to live.

Despite that, she believes she will represent the constituents of the Dublin ward where she is running because "I'm one of the people who don't get much problems to connect to people...in my country [Malawi] we say the good spirit always attracts the good spirit"

Asked how she would change the Direct Provision system, she says "I'd at least give the people Independence, allow them work and to end their independence. That's the first thing I would do".

Her campaign flyer reads: "I believe in standing for all causes that matter to us all especially better healthcare services, affordable housing, women's and minority rights."

Up until 2017, approximately 10% of asylum requests were granted in Ireland but 80% of deportation orders against failed asylum seekers are never implemented.

Broadcast: RTÉ | The Ray D'Arcy Show | 29 Jan 2019

Social Democrats:



Social Democrats candidate Ellie Kisyombe admits she failed her asylum claim and has been appealing



transcription here:

https://www.politicalirish.com/threads/rtÉ-promotes-rejected-asylum-seeker-and-social-democrat-candidate-running-for-election-in-dublin.28916/post-347743

ENAR upset over "unsympathetic" exposé on rejected asylum seeker Ellie Kisyombe in The Sunday Times


Thread here:

 
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Catalpa

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I listened to some of that

She was incoherent a lot of the time and talked in Riddles

So she certainly has the makings of a successful Politician!

Maybe Bertie gave her a few lessons....:cool:

Ray was as usual totally impartial and did not ask any leading questions

He pretty well roasted her over the coals and put her to the pin of her collar

Well not quite folks....

Hopefully this chancer goes nowhere

- except back Home.
 

Florence

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I heard the full interview - was tempted to switch off as it was so irritating. A apt comparison that she was confusing just like Bertie was. I got the impression from her waffle that she arrived on a plane with her twins but Ray did not pick this up and ask if there were direct flights from Malawi. Given that she has been here 10 years, I was annoyed that Ray did not get over to the listener that she must have appealed many times. He did not ask 'when was your application rejected?'

The poor woman has to share a room with her daughter in the detention centre. Shock horror. The daughter has a university place courtesy of the tax payer as she received a scholarship from the Irish Refugee Council.

The irony of her saying that in the future Ireland will see Detention Centres as a national embarrassement......
 

The Potato Mystic

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She was incoherent a lot of the time and talked in Riddles

So she certainly has the makings of a successful Politician!.
That is what sums it up. An inarticulate, insecure, half con-person who "fled" Malawi which isn't at war and who whilst here can be counted on not to cause any trouble for the regime. The ideal individual the regime wants to lever into the political class as opposed to the troublesome Irish person with their "unreasonable" demands for a decent standard of living.
 

Florence

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Before this came to my attention I did not know that asylum seekers/economic refugees could vote and stand in local elections. This was introduced in 2004. How was it that I, someone who is very interested in current affairs did not know that? This 'reform' was introduced by Martin Cullen, now enjoying his huge Ministerial pension.

Why was this change introduced? there was absolutely no demand for it and citizens had just voted to stop automatic citizenship for babies born here if the parents at the time of the birth had no right to be in Ireland.
 

OrderoftheDragon

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I'm surprised there wasn't more comment about this but then most people here don't listen to rte i suppose........

1. she flew into dublin to claim asylum, so either via London, Paris, Amsterdam or Berlin.

2. she let the cat out the bag, that apparently there are more asylum centers now functioning that the official no. given.


What else have the Irish people not been told by our totally traitorous establishment ?
 

Una

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RTÉ promotes rejected asylum seeker and Social Democrat candidate running for election in Dublin



RTÉ's Ray D'Arcy invited Ellie Kisyombe onto his show to discuss her candidacy for councillor in Dublin city (LE19) for the Social Democrats in the upcoming council elections in May.

Kisyombe says she fled from Malawi and has been living in Ireland's Direct Provision system for almost a decade.

Since 2004, asylum seekers in Ireland have been allowed to vote and run in local council elections. The first day they were allowed to vote was the same day the Irish public voted to remove birth right citizenship from the constitution as too many pregnant asylum seekers were flying into Dublin in order to gain citizenship for their children and maternity hospitals had begged the government to do something.

Kisyombe says it's good that she can run in council elections as that will be a start and "you never know what will happen next". She says she was born into a very political family in Malawi and lost many members of her family which was "some of the reason they made me flee there".

Fearing for her life

Ray asked were her whether her family members were killed to which she responded:

"I would use that word but unfortunately where I'm coming from feels like that. They can go years and years without you know being sorted out or even confirmation of that but definitely that's what really happened to my parents and uncle."

Asked whether she feared for her life, she replied:

"I did because I don't think if I was in Malawi, the way I am I think I'd be talking to you right now, Ray. I'm glad that I'm in Ireland."

Direct Provision:

Kisyombe told Ray when she first arrived in Ireland she was put into a reception centre and stayed there for four weeks before being moved into a Direct Provision centre.

Being told that there were now 39 Direct Provision centres in Ireland, she remarked:

"And there even more than that because I know that you know we've had a bit of troubles so I can't blame RIA (Reception & Integration Agency) on that. We've had a little bit of troubles so there other places that within they're not mentioned quite a lot because ah, [coughs] anyway, I don't even need to go there. I don't have facts but let's say there are 39 at the moment."

She said she was allowed €21.60 a week in Direct Provision but did not mention that this weekly allowance is set to rise in March March to €38.80 for adults and €29.80 for Children.

Eligibility to work:

She said that while someone is in Direct Provision they are not allowed to work, get education or cook.

Ray reminded her that asylum seekers are now allowed to work but Kisyombe said there were too many conditions and "people like me can't be allowed to work."

"I'm the odd system so that law doesn't apply me. I'm not really sure why not. It does not apply to me because I've stayed long time in Direct Provision".

Under new rules, asylum seekers are allowed to work in Ireland as long as they have been here for nine months without being given a decision on their application. If they are refused asylum, often they appeal the result continuously and remain in Direct Provision, unable to work legally.

Kisyombe said she had two 18 year old twins with one in third level education. She said a scholarship from the Irish Refugee Council funded the first year in college her friend councillor Gary Gannon helped to get her funding for the following year. She also gets some help for transport from the Social Welfare Dept.

On a campaign flyer, she describes herself as a chef and small business owner despite not being allowed to work.

Why her asylum case is taking so long:

Ray said that people would be interested to know why her asylum case is taking so long.

"In my situation...in our situation for people that we've been here for mostly a decade now, the time our case is too long. I'm not sure what's going on in there which maybe one day I might understand."

She said over the past eight years, she can't remember how many letters she got about her asylum case from the Dept of Justice and believes Ireland will look back on the Direct Provision system as a national embarrassment.

Ability to represent Dubliners:

She lives in a reception centre in Dundalk because she says they closed the apartments where she used to live.

Despite that, she believes she will represent the constituents of the Dublin ward where she is running because "I'm one of the people who don't get much problems to connect to people...in my country [Malawi] we say the good spirit always attracts the good spirit"

Asked how she would change the Direct Provision system, she says "I'd at least give the people Independence, allow them work and to end their independence. That's the first thing I would do".

Her campaign flyer reads: "I believe in standing for all causes that matter to us all especially better healthcare services, affordable housing, women's and minority rights."

Up until 2017, approximately 10% of asylum requests were granted in Ireland but 80% of deportation orders against failed asylum seekers are never implemented.

Broadcast: RTÉ | The Ray D'Arcy Show | 29 Jan 2019

Social Democrats:

Seriously, tell the Social Democrats to go on a Diet already.......... i thankfully didn't hear the whole episode.... a blood boiling Farce.
 
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