Renewable Energy Efficiency

Count Bobulescu

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#1
A place to discuss Renewable Energy, and/or Energy Efficiency, until more specific threads are appropriate.

I'll start with this.
It's got to be only a matter of time before a single floating device will harness both wind and wave off the west coast, then Ireland can b[font=helvetica,]uh bye to the EU.[/font] 

[font=helvetica,]Researchers Develop Low-Cost Offshore Floating Wind Turbine
Joshua S Hill, CleanTechnica[/font]


Researchers have designed and patented a floating platform for offshore wind turbines that they believe can reduce costs up to 12 euro cents per kilowatt hour. A team of researchers from the the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) developed the new model of a floating structure for offshore wind turbines, called WindCrete, that is capable of being anchored at much greater sea depths.

[font=helvetica,]http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2015/1103/Are-floating-wind-turbines-the-future-of-clean-energy[/font]


Why Does The IEA Underestimate Renewables

Since then, IEA has become a widely respected source of energy data and analysis. Its annual World Energy Outlook (WEO) is considered the gold standard in energy modeling, producing endless media coverage and shaping the assumptions of policymakers and the investment class.
It is somewhat vexing, then, that the IEA has always been, and remains, dismally pessimistic about wind and solar energy. This pessimism has led it to underestimate wind and solar again and again, a track record of failure one might think would trouble an agency known for the quality of its modeling. But if it's troubled, IEA hasn't let on.
What's more difficult to figure out is why. Why does the IEA continue to lowball renewables, even in the face of persistent critiques? There are several stories about this floating around, and none of them are entirely satisfying.
http://www.vox.com/2015/10/12/9510879/iea-underestimate-renewables
 
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#2
Sea states will be problematic for your floating devices on the west coast of Ireland. 

Transmission is a problem for any device, and is the main reason for the IEA's pessimism, followed closely by reliable on-demand availability.
 

spoilsport

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Until they can sort out the excess storage of wind power, it will remain an intermittent, and over costly form of power, which requires subsidies to keep the suppliers in the market.

If the whole fair Isle was covered from tit to toe in turbines, the oil/coal/peat power stations still need to be running in the background to cover peak/off peak periods when the wind is not strong enough/too strong, or turbines are down for maintenance etc...  

Its really a subsidy scam for suppliers, land owners and for green eco-tards to feel warm n fuzzy inside,!!

I feel tidal & wind is the most reliable form of constant energy for our geographical location, and turbines as a poor relation.
 
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Count Bobulescu

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#4
No big surprise here, except that it's possible it will get worse with greater adoption of IoT.
And it's a reason Republicans want to Drill Baby Drill!
[font=arial,san-serif]
http://pewresearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=434f5d1199912232d416897e4&id=09f4fa2f84&e=4f202db4e0
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[font=arial,san-serif][size=x-small][font=arial,san-serif]Follow @facttank[/font]http://pewresearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=434f5d1199912232d416897e4&id=09f4fa2f84&e=4f202db4e0
[/font][/size]

[font=Georgia,serif]U.S. homes have become considerably more energy efficient over the past four decades, according to government data. But homes also are a lot bigger than they used to be, and their growing girth wipes out nearly all the efficiency gains. [font=arial,san-serif]read more >[/font][/font]
 

ergo2

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#5
Any expert here on solar power?

I realise we don't get much sun, but solar has less moving parts, less intrusion on landscape, no noise.

Even if a few panels on a roof generated only a small part of a house's energy, it would help the overall situation
 

Dan Óg

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#6
The institute of engineers of ireland, have long ago pointed out the futility of windpower, solar would have similar issues. The big problem is you need 20% excess capacity at all time, as insurance in case a generating point would break down, because you can't afford blackouts in a modern society. Since there is little ability to store this excessit is just drained into the ground. As more wind is introduced you have to introduce the 20% a fossil. It is a rigmaneeding a booklet to explain but even if the wind was steady and constant it would still need other support and of course it is intermittent. Also the electricity is not clean or quality which basicallymeans it is not close to 50 hertz, to gel with the grid.
 On a large scale, to store the energy till needed you need to go back to basic physics and convert it to potential energy by pumping water up a height and having it available to flow down when needed. The effeciency  aND costmagnitude is not feasable.
  OOn a single house level you could heat your water but on a large scale it is a complete and utter scam. A rip off that makes the bail out puny in comparison.  
  IIn the future they may develop a caacitor, a device similar to a battery in ways, that can store the power in huge volume.

SO quick answer, it is a scam, same as a lot of things
 
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#8
The future might be fusion as well as solar (and wind):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-35074848


A German nuclear fusion experiment has produced a special super-hot gas which scientists hope will eventually lead to clean, cheap energy.
The helium plasma - a cloud of loose, charged particles - lasted just a tenth of a second and was about one million degrees Celsius.
It was hailed as a breakthrough for the Max Planck Institute's stellarator - a chamber whose design differs from the tokamak fusion devices used elsewhere.
The Sun's energy is created by fusion.
Physicists are in a worldwide race to create stable fusion devices that could not only mimic the Sun but release abundant energy, without the volumes of toxic waste generated by nuclear fission - the splitting of the atom.
but it could be wishful thinking:

Scientists have been working on nuclear fusion for more than 50 years but the extreme temperatures involved and the difficulty of controlling plasmas mean progress is slow.
 
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Count Bobulescu

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#9
Ren84 said:
To those who think wind can meet 100% of our energy needs........

6lG9M5o.png
Can you identify any serious commentator who claims wind can meet 100% of any country's needs?
I've never heard anyone make such a claim, or anything remotely like it.
 
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