Progressive Jazz (The New Bloods)

D

Deleted member 863

Non Registered Member
GUEST
A thread for lovers of jazz music from across the years. Though my tastes cover the decades from the mid/late 1930's through to today, such a wide curve of musical originality will be hard to contain in one singular thread: this one might be used to highlight the more progressive elements of the jazz music of the 'new bloods' who took their cues from masters like Goodman, Davis, Monk, Brubeck, Parker, et al.

This is Phronesis from Denmark; which is essentially just the magic of double-bassist Jasper Høiby and his outrageously complex compositions which utilize insane time signatures such as 13/8 and even fifteenth and seventeenth note divisions. Yet he grooves through the timing as though it's all fluid and regular even though it's very difficult even for the listener to keep up with.

In this video he uses that New York powerhouse of a rhythmatist, Mark Guiliana - who played on Bowie's final album amongst many, many other projects over the recent years. He's one of the most in-demand session players in the world today, and for obvious reasons. On piano we have Ivo Neame: a master pianist who takes his cues from classical forms and transcribes them into these amazingly fluid runs and crescendos across very complex timings and accents.

It's a lengthy piece at around ten minutes and the solos and heads are laid out out very clearly: heads first, then bass, then piano, and finally Guliana's crashing and unorthodox interpretation of awkward time signatures and massive accents pushing time even further out into the cosmos on drums. This truly is musical genius, and the conversation between the player's instruments is just riveting, incomparable, and utterly original. Nothing like it anywhere else.

Turn this baby up and have a sweet Sunday morning:

Phronesis: 'Abraham's New Gift' (From 'Alive'- Forge Arts, London - 2010))

 
D

Deleted member 2585

Non Registered Member
GUEST
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
I've never really got in to jazz. I downloaded Miles Davis' Kind of blue recently, and think it's great. Do you have any recommendations for a beginner?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Deleted member 2531

Non Registered Member
GUEST
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
A thread for lovers of jazz music from across the years. Though my tastes cover the decades from the mid/late 1930's through to today, such a wide curve of musical originality will be hard to contain in one singular thread: this one might be used to highlight the more progressive elements of the jazz music of the 'new bloods' who took their cues from masters like Goodman, Davis, Monk, Brubeck, Parker, et al.

This is Phronesis from Denmark; which is essentially just the magic of double-bassist Jasper Høiby and his outrageously complex compositions which utilize insane time signatures such as 13/8 and even fifteenth and seventeenth note divisions. Yet he grooves through the timing as though it's all fluid and regular even though it's very difficult even for the listener to keep up with.

In this video he uses that New York powerhouse of a rhythmatist, Mark Guiliana - who played on Bowie's final album amongst many, many other projects over the recent years. He's one of the most in-demand session players in the world today, and for obvious reasons. On piano we have Ivo Neame: a master pianist who takes his cues from classical forms and transcribes them into these amazingly fluid runs and crescendos across very complex timings and accents.

It's a lengthy piece at around ten minutes and the solos and heads are laid out out very clearly: heads first, then bass, then piano, and finally Guliana's crashing and unorthodox interpretation of awkward time signatures and massive accents pushing time even further out into the cosmos on drums. This truly is musical genius, and the conversation between the player's instruments is just riveting, incomparable, and utterly original. Nothing like it anywhere else.

Turn this baby up and have a sweet Sunday morning:

Phronesis: 'Abraham's New Gift' (From 'Alive'- Forge Arts, London - 2010))

More Nordic jazz from Esbjorn Svensson RIP. I heard him play in Roscrea castle in 2002
 

FairstoodtheWind

PI Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2015
Messages
2,983
Likes
5,608
I've never really got in to jazz. I downloaded Myles Davis' Kind of blue recently, and think it's great. Do you have any recommendations for a beginner?
keep exploring Miles.

my favourite Miles is an album called "Ascenseur pour L'Echafaud". One of my favourite albums of all time. late night, rainy sort of vibe. Also "bitches brew" but it is more out there.

Also.. "A Love Supreme" by John Coltrane. A very famous and mainstream album for Jazz fans.. but totally deserves it.

The Dave Brubeck Quartet too.. worth checking out. The track "take five".. i bet you already know.
Nina Simone for some vocal jazz.
 
D

Deleted member 863

Non Registered Member
GUEST
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
I've never really got in to jazz. I downloaded Myles Davis' Kind of blue recently, and think it's great. Do you have any recommendations for a beginner?
You couldn't possibly have started off on a better foot.

Kind Of Blue is a turning point in world music, not just jazz. Miles once attended dinner at The White House during Nixon's tenure and Nixon's wife asked him: 'oh, hello - so who are you and what do you do?'

To which Miles casually replied: 'I'm Miles Davis - I have singularly changed the direction of music on this planet not once, but five times in my life. What do you do?'

Immerse yourself in the album: especially late at night.

It truly is a work of genius.

More Nordic jazz from Esbjorn Svensson RIP. I heard him play in Roscrea castle in 2002

Ahh, you little beauty!

You just made my Sunday morning blossom into a bright afternoon.

Not even the snow shines as brightly.

keep exploring Miles.
Best advice on thread so far.

And just so we don't scare away the traditionalists, here's a stunning interpretation of a classic by another ranked genius who somehow managed to slip under the radar over the years. This still shines so bright though, and gives me shivers when i think of home from here in the depths of the Arctic snow.

Sublime.

Courtney Pine: 'Children Of The Ghetto' (Journey To The Urge Within - 1986)

 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Deleted member 863

Non Registered Member
GUEST
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Returning to the theme of progressive jazz music, here's another little diamond of a vamp on a basic groove over a single chord with some head-pieces thrown in to break up the singularity of the movement. John McLoughlin recorded this masterpiece in Paris with an almost entirely new line-up of musicians he hadn't worked with before but who managed to deliver on his dreamscapes. He used his old pal Tommy Campbell on drums and Katia LeBeque (his wife and one of two twins born with a magical ability to perceive each other's next moves on classical piano pieces) on piano and synths.

The basic form is a vamp on a chord, and while some of the synth sounds haven't aged too well, the forward movement of this piece is like trying to stop a turning tide: it just keeps growing in intensity and outward exponential waves. Perhaps a players song rather than a listeners, but I love this one in the early mornings:

John McLoughlin: 'One Melody' (Belo Horizonte - 1983)

 
D

Deleted member 863

Non Registered Member
GUEST
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
This is Trilok Gurtu, percussion master from India. He's worked with just about everybody by now as his originality is exceptional and unpredictable. This piece is a self-composed tune which mixes up elements of jazz with pop, rock, country, trad, and much more besides.

It's kind of a playground for Gurtu to have projects of his own as his solo shows are mesmerizing in themselves. I caught his clinic here in the neighbourhood at the Pop/Jazz Conservatory around the corner and got to meet him. If he weren't a master percussionist he'd have been a comedian: the guy had me just fit to burst. He seemed to think it hilarious that people flew him in from all over the planet and paid him to do what he loved to do the most even though he could see how much people loved his performances and weren't there out of obligation or curiosity: they came to be blinded by simplicity and unselfish spirituality. He never let's a crowd down, our Trilok.

Trilok Gurtu & The Glimpse: 'Shunyai' (live)


Later I'll show you something he did with John McLoughlin, the guitarist above.
 
Top Bottom