Progress needed on Traveller ethnicity – Adams | Sinn Féin - Enda telling more porky pies, eh?

Tadhg Gaelach

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#2
So Soros Féin are pushing the line that the Travellers are a different race to the Irish. That will really help them :rolleyes:
 

Minerva

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#3
So Soros Féin are pushing the line that the Travellers are a different race to the Irish. That will really help them :rolleyes:
"The emergence of the concept of ‘ethnicity’ has much to do with the decline of the term ‘race’. It is suggested that race was developed as an exclusive criterion built on arbitrary classifications of populations, with the (at least initial) intention of drawing hierarchical rankings of groups.
Ethnicity, by contrast, could be said to be based on shared culture and heritage, and should be considered an inclusive term through which groups identify themselves and are identified by others.
It should be noted, however, that ethnicity is as indeterminate as race.
Neither concept has any basis in biology, for there are no discernible biological differences between ethnic groups or racial groups that have been found to be constant.

They come together in the UN International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 1965 (‘Race Convention’), which defines racial discrimination as occurring on the basis of 5 grounds: race, colour, descent, national origin or ethnic origin.

Recognition of Irish Travellers as an Ethnic Group? – Human Rights in Ireland
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#4
"The emergence of the concept of ‘ethnicity’ has much to do with the decline of the term ‘race’. It is suggested that race was developed as an exclusive criterion built on arbitrary classifications of populations, with the (at least initial) intention of drawing hierarchical rankings of groups.
Ethnicity, by contrast, could be said to be based on shared culture and heritage, and should be considered an inclusive term through which groups identify themselves and are identified by others.
It should be noted, however, that ethnicity is as indeterminate as race.
Neither concept has any basis in biology, for there are no discernible biological differences between ethnic groups or racial groups that have been found to be constant.

They come together in the UN International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 1965 (‘Race Convention’), which defines racial discrimination as occurring on the basis of 5 grounds: race, colour, descent, national origin or ethnic origin.

Recognition of Irish Travellers as an Ethnic Group? – Human Rights in Ireland

The Travellers are pure blooded Gael. Their race and ethnicity is Gaelic.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#5
It should be noted, however, that ethnicity is as indeterminate as race.
Neither concept has any basis in biology, for there are no discernible biological differences between ethnic groups or racial groups that have been found to be constant.

Rubbish. Every race has distinct genetic differences from other races.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#6
I think the ethnic status is necessary for them to map out their future in education, housing and employment.
Well this is the problem. Under this mad régime you don't get anything if you say you are an Irish person who wants their basic rights. You have to get yourself recognised as some sort of oppressed minority. It's really just a way of breaking up the Irish people and making it appear we don't even exist as a people. That makes it easier to exterminate us with mass immigration.
 

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Rubbish. Every race has distinct genetic differences from other races.
Because there is a complex relation between ancestry, genetic makeup and phenotype, and because racial categories are based on subjective evaluations of the traits, it is not the case that there are any specific genes, that can be used to determine a person's race.

The Blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history that used to be taught at school said the Irish were simply a Celtic people, related to the central European Celts, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ...
Research done into the DNA of the Irish has shown that our old understanding of where the population of Ireland originated may have been misguided. Although the modern Irish have been shown to share many genetic similarities with Scottish and Welsh populations, and to differ somewhat from the English, due to repeated waves of migration to the island they also have close genetic relations with people further afield. In fact, some of the Irish's closest DNA links are with quite unexpected regions!

Research into Irish DNA at the beginning of the twenty-first century suggests that the early inhabitants of Ireland were not directly descended from the Keltoi of central Europe. Genome sequencing performed on remains of early settlers in Ireland by researchers at Trinity University in Dublin and Queens University has revealed at least two waves of migration to the island in past millennia. Analysis of the remains of a 5,200 year-old Irish farmer suggested that the population of Ireland at that time was closely genetically related to the modern-day populations of southern Europe, especially Spain and Sardinia. Her ancestors, however, originally migrated from the Middle East, the cradle of agriculture.

Blood of the Irish: What DNA Tells Us About the Ancestry of People in Ireland

Must be a terrible shock to think that the Middle East comes into it and you so opposed to their migration on the basis of race.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#8
Because there is a complex relation between ancestry, genetic makeup and phenotype, and because racial categories are based on subjective evaluations of the traits, it is not the case that there are any specific genes, that can be used to determine a person's race.

The Blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history that used to be taught at school said the Irish were simply a Celtic people, related to the central European Celts, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ...
Research done into the DNA of the Irish has shown that our old understanding of where the population of Ireland originated may have been misguided. Although the modern Irish have been shown to share many genetic similarities with Scottish and Welsh populations, and to differ somewhat from the English, due to repeated waves of migration to the island they also have close genetic relations with people further afield. In fact, some of the Irish's closest DNA links are with quite unexpected regions!

Research into Irish DNA at the beginning of the twenty-first century suggests that the early inhabitants of Ireland were not directly descended from the Keltoi of central Europe. Genome sequencing performed on remains of early settlers in Ireland by researchers at Trinity University in Dublin and Queens University has revealed at least two waves of migration to the island in past millennia. Analysis of the remains of a 5,200 year-old Irish farmer suggested that the population of Ireland at that time was closely genetically related to the modern-day populations of southern Europe, especially Spain and Sardinia. Her ancestors, however, originally migrated from the Middle East, the cradle of agriculture.

Blood of the Irish: What DNA Tells Us About the Ancestry of People in Ireland

Must be a terrible shock to think that the Middle East comes into it and you so opposed to their migration on the basis of race.

Over thousands of years, many influences may come into it. But research shows that Irish and Scottish DNA is 88% unchanged since the end of the Ice Age, 10,000 years ago. Wales about 75% and England 67%. That's very telling, even with all the invasions England has been subjected to, the population is still mostly the same as it was in the Neolithic. That is a magnificent genetic heritage, and only an ignorant buffoon would wantonly through it away - all for the sake of cheap immigrant labour and high rents. As for Spain, it was a Celtic land - as was Portugal. In many parts of Spain - and France too - the population is Celtic.
 
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