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Ortha Nan Gaidheal - The Carmina Gadelica

Tadhg Gaelach

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The Maying of Queen Guinevere, by John Collier


Here are volumes One and Two of Alexander Carmichael's collection of prayers, incantations and spells from the Western Isles of Scotland. Carmichael spent years collecting folklore from the vanishing cultures of Scotland. The poems in this volume include prayers, invocations, blessings and charms. They are a synthesis of Christian and pre-Christian belief systems. Besides invoking Jesus, Mary, and the saints, a number of these call on other powers. One of these is 'Bride,' who is explained as Jesus' midwife, but who is probably Brigid, an ancient Celtic goddess. Also mentioned throughout are a triune deity which is equated to the Christian Trinity, but which may also be an echo of a set of three pagan deities. The text includes notes on seasonal observances and folk customs which are probably likewise survivals of pre-Christian customs. All of these are woven into the cycles of the year, and activities such as weaving, fishing and herding. A vivid picture of life in pre-modern rural Scotland emerges.


This text includes all of the Gaelic text, Carmicheal's English translations, and the beautiful initials from the first edition.


 

page61

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The Maying of Queen Guinevere, by John Collier


Here are volumes One and Two of Alexander Carmichael's collection of prayers, incantations and spells from the Western Isles of Scotland. Carmichael spent years collecting folklore from the vanishing cultures of Scotland. The poems in this volume include prayers, invocations, blessings and charms. They are a synthesis of Christian and pre-Christian belief systems. Besides invoking Jesus, Mary, and the saints, a number of these call on other powers. One of these is 'Bride,' who is explained as Jesus' midwife, but who is probably Brigid, an ancient Celtic goddess. Also mentioned throughout are a triune deity which is equated to the Christian Trinity, but which may also be an echo of a set of three pagan deities. The text includes notes on seasonal observances and folk customs which are probably likewise survivals of pre-Christian customs. All of these are woven into the cycles of the year, and activities such as weaving, fishing and herding. A vivid picture of life in pre-modern rural Scotland emerges.


This text includes all of the Gaelic text, Carmicheal's English translations, and the beautiful initials from the first edition.



That is a stunning picture ...
 

DrPat2

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The Maying of Queen Guinevere, by John Collier


Here are volumes One and Two of Alexander Carmichael's collection of prayers, incantations and spells from the Western Isles of Scotland. Carmichael spent years collecting folklore from the vanishing cultures of Scotland. The poems in this volume include prayers, invocations, blessings and charms. They are a synthesis of Christian and pre-Christian belief systems. Besides invoking Jesus, Mary, and the saints, a number of these call on other powers. One of these is 'Bride,' who is explained as Jesus' midwife, but who is probably Brigid, an ancient Celtic goddess. Also mentioned throughout are a triune deity which is equated to the Christian Trinity, but which may also be an echo of a set of three pagan deities. The text includes notes on seasonal observances and folk customs which are probably likewise survivals of pre-Christian customs. All of these are woven into the cycles of the year, and activities such as weaving, fishing and herding. A vivid picture of life in pre-modern rural Scotland emerges.


This text includes all of the Gaelic text, Carmicheal's English translations, and the beautiful initials from the first edition.


Incredibly precious resource. Was this ever done in this format on our own native shore?

The picture reminds me of the opening words of the chorus of the Marian hymn 'Queen of the May' aka 'Bring Flowers of the Rarest'

'O Mary, we crown thee with blossoms today, Queen of the Angels and Queen of the May'.
 
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