No more Fianna Fáil back-of-the envelope housing policy - Eoin Ó Broin TD

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#1
No more Fianna Fáil back-of-the envelope housing policy - Eoin Ó Broin TD

Sinn Féin housing spokesperson Eoin Ó Broin TD has called on Fianna Fáil housing spokesperson Barry Cowen to ‘publish the detail and cost of his latest housing policy proposals’ and said that ‘people won’t-stand for any more back-of-the-envelope housing policy’.

Deputy Ó Broin said:

“Over the weekend, the Fianna Fáil housing spokesperson outlined a series of proposals which he said would help tackle the housing crisis. They included a VAT holiday for developers; a cut to development levies; cuts to certification charges; and reductions in planning charges.

“No details or costings for these proposals are available on either Deputy Cowen’s or the Fianna Fáil website. Just like Fine Gael it appears that Fianna Fáil are making their housing policy up as they go along.

“The proposed VAT cut would cost the Government up to €240m. Where does Deputy Cowen propose to cut this from next year’s budget? How will he ensure that such a cut is passed on to the consumer? Do he really believe that people buying homes for €500,000 or more should benefit to the tune of tens of thousands of euro?

“How is his proposed development levy reduction scheme different from that already in existence? Alan Kelly introduced a development levy rebate scheme in 2015 to encourage affordable home construction. It has been an abject failure.

"Deputy Cowen appears to be proposing cutting development levies to developers who build now. How much will this cost? Where will Local Councils make up the revenue shortfall from? What local service will have to be cut to fund this proposal?

“Deputy Cowen also proposed cutting certification fees. The prices for these are set in the private sector and charged to developers. Is Fianna Fáil proposing to cap these charges? If so what level of charge are they proposing? Have they produced the necessary legislation? “It is not good enough for a party seeking Government office to produce this kind of back-of-the-envelope housing policy and finance proposals. The people in desperate need of housing deserve better. Barry Cowen should publish the details of his proposals including the costings so that people can judge for themselves.“On the basis of what we know this is a return to the bad old days of developer led housing policy which did so much damage to our economy the last time Fianna Fáil were in power.” - Sinn Féin (@sinnfeinireland) · Twitter

'Woman sleeping in tent becomes third homeless death this week' - Eoin Ó Broin‏ @EOBroin 1h1 hour ago
 
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Antóin Mac Comháin
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#6
Nina Simone - Backlash Blues



Her mother Margaret told the Herald she despaired of finding a suitable home for herself and the children - then the council offered her a bungalow in Glenshane Lawns, Tallaght. "It was a boarded-up house and Danielle knew the previous tenant in it had taken her own life in the house," she said.

"She was that desperate to have somewhere to live that she accepted it and was finally looking forward to moving in - only for her hopes to be dashed," Margaret said at her home in Tallaght.


Tallaght House that Danielle had been offered

"She got a letter from the council on Wednesday the week before, to say they were withdrawing that offer and substituting it with a different place in the Meile An Ri estate, in Lucan, but when she saw it she was horrified," her best friend Linda Woods added. - 'Homeless crisis killed my girl' - Mother's devastation after young woman found dead in hotel room - Independent.ie

Dáil debates

Thursday, 13 October 2011

Dessie Ellis: Recently, I visited the Balgaddy estate with my colleague, Eoin Ó Broin, where I met residents and had a tour of the general area. Balgaddy estate is a 400 unit social housing estate comprising three developments, namely, Meile An Rí, Buirg An Rí and Tor An Rí. It was built between 2004 and 2007 on the border of Lucan and Clondalkin. The design of the estate won awards from the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland in 2004. It was to be a model urban village with community facilities, employment opportunities and social and affordable housing. Today, for many of its residents Balgaddy is a nightmare.

From the very start, residents complained of damp, structural cracks inside and outside the houses, faulty heating systems and leaks from badly constructed roofs. The promised community facilities were never provided and units held over for this purpose remain vacant. So much for the social dividend that was promised. To date, the only facility provided is a children's play area which was completed recently, seven years after the residents moved in.

From the very beginning, Balgaddy residents raised their concerns with South Dublin County Council. When no adequate response from the council was forthcoming they formed the Balgaddy Working Together group in an attempt to force the council to meet its obligations. Seven years later, the residents are angry and frustrated at the false promises and neglect of the council, and rightly so.

Brian Hayes: My colleague, the Minister of State with responsibility for housing and planning, understands from the housing authority that issues have arisen which require remedial works on window sashes, roof flashings and external plaster cracks. There is also an issue with condensation and mould growth which arose as a result of increased insulation linked to ventilation levels required by the building regulations. In some cases condensation is a result of building fabric failure and in others by the pattern of tenant use. - Social and Affordable Housing: 13 Oct 2011: Dáil debates ...

Concern about children in ‘mould-ridden’ house

April 15, 2016

THE issue of damp in council homes is back on the agenda this week, after a Tallaght mother raised concerns for her children’s health whom she claims are living in a “mould-ridden” council house.

Kerry Killeen has been living in a bungalow in Glenshane for the past ten years with her three children aged 13, six and five.

She told The Echo: “The house is so damp and mould-ridden, the smell of damp is potent and it sticks to everything, even our clothes.

“We can’t use one of the bedrooms because the mould has gotten so bad and I had to stop using the wardrobes because everything I put in there would come out damp and with mould.

“I have to store everything in plastic, sealed containers.”

She added: “I’m very concerned for my children’s health, they’re all on double inhalers and while my doctor can’t confirm that their breathing problems are down to the damp, I know that the situation can’t be helping.

“I have contacted the council a number of times and they have visited my home, but just told me to paint over it. - Concern about children in 'mould-ridden' house - the Echo

Four People Dead Following Clondalkin Fire - Second class housing, for second class fools? - Earnán Ó Maille,

April, 2017

'There is no mould in the houses in Neilstown or Balgaddy estates, which were built long before the Celtic Tiger. The new houses are in a similar condition to houses which were built 60-70 years ago: Column: Dolphin's Barn residents dreading a damp Christmas. It could be just an accident, as I said in the OP, but it's only a matter of time until disaster strikes.'


Civic_critic2
The more pertinent point is this: "She said the council told her if they did not accept it, she would lose her emergency accommodation". If this is true then it may be the direct cause of her committing suicide.

The fear of being a single-mother condemned to Public Housing, drove this young woman to commit suicide, but despite being an easily preventable death, it was also an easily predictable and inevitable tragedy.
 

Antos

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#7
I think a good starting point would be for the muppets emboldened, to stop scapegoating defenseless immigrants, I think the RRI project had the potential to appeal to a portion of the 26% of the homeless who are working, but like Statsman says, I don't think one shoe fits all. The absentee landlords I'm referring to are based in London, and they aren't half as clever as they think they are, if the gobdaws they are funding are anything to go by.
 
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