New Nationalist Party formed in Ireland - An Páirtí Náisiúnta \ The National Party

Ire-land

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I came across this diary excerpt when digging around about Pearse after the chat last night. It's probably well known, but I hadn't seen it before, so figured I'd post it. It's from the diary of a British solider.

Knowing Dublin so well, I was able to walk in the steps of the account, I found it extremely moving tbh.

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Extracts from Samuel Lomas’s account of Easter 1916

APRIL 24th
8.30pm Watford. Received orders to prepare for a sudden move.

APRIL 25th
3.20pm Boarded the Royal Mail steamer Ulster for Kingstown.

APRIL 27th
Noon Marched out from the Royal Hospital en route for Dublin Castle. All along the road, constant sniping was going on but the Royal Irish, by keeping up a constant fire in the direction of the snipers, prevented them from concentrating their fire on the column. We arrived at Dublin Castle without any casualties.

6pm ‘D’ Coy were ordered to proceed along Cappel Street, Parnell Street to consolidate the position held by the Royal Irish. We moved out and on crossing the bridge over the river from Parliament Street, we came under heavy fire from the Sein Feinners. We proceeded up Cappel Street and on entering Parnell Street, at every cross street we were subjected to rifle fire from the enemy. On arrival at Moore Street, I was instructed to make a barricade right across the street.

APRIL 28th
10am The men were allowed to rest in the sun when not on duty, taking care to have cover from the snipers in the locality.

Noon One 18-pounder arrived and laid facing down Moore Street in the direction of the G.P.O. Four shells were fired which caused the rebels to quake, as for some considerable time, the rifle fire was silent, with the exception of a few snipers. The artillery proved most useful, & were in my opinion mainly the cause of the surrender of the rebels.

7pm Trouble by a man several times coming to the barricades, he being full of beer.

APRIL 29th
9am Received instructions to prepare for storming parties of 20 men and an officer, and to provide ourselves with tools of any description to break down the doors etc. To search the houses through to Henry Street and to make a breach when necessary in the walls.

12.30pm All ready and the assault commenced. My party were allotted to an alley with houses either side. My weapon was a bar 5’6” long 1” strength with a lever end – a beautiful tool for the purpose. I struck at one door such a smack and knocked the door complete for some 5 yards into the house, breaking hinges and lock at the same time. Sweating like the devil! (Rather with fear, excitement or work) It is surprising how the lust to destroy comes over you.

2pm Orders are passed for us to stand by as a white flag was approaching the end of Moore Street. This was found to be from Sean O’Connelly [James Connolly] asking for terms of surrender. Instructions were sent back up the street for O’Connelly to come down and interview the General in command of our troops. This was done, O’Connelly being carried down on a stretcher, as he was wounded in the leg. Whilst standing by, we came across the dead body of O’Reilly [the O’Rahilly], the acting adjutant.

MAY 2nd
9pm I was warned to provide a party of 48 men and 4 sergeants for a special duty parade at 3am the following morning. I was told as a special favour I had been allowed to go as one of the party as senior NCO.

MAY 3rd
We paraded at the time appointed, marched to Kilmainham Jail. At 3.45 the first rebel MacDonoghue [Thomas MacDonagh] was marched in blindfolded, and the firing party placed 10 paces distant. Death was instantaneous. The second, P.H. Pierce [Pádraig Pearse] whistled as he came out of the cell (after taking a sad farewell of his wife.) [Pearse wasn’t married, and was visited only by a Capuchin priest, Fr Aloysius.] The same applied to him. The third, J.H. Clarke [Tom Clarke], an old man, was not quite so fortunate, requiring a bullet from the officer to complete the ghastly business (it was sad to think that these three brave men who met their death so bravely should be fighting for a cause which proved so useless and had been the means of so much bloodshed).

5am This business being over, I was able to return to bed for two hours and excused duty until noon.
 

Ire-land

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I always wondered why I could never find a face on picture of Pearse, I'd thought it was more a stylistic trait of the time.

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"In the early photos Pearse has the appearance of a dreamy child. There is this air of detachment also in the photos of him as a schoolboy in the Christian Brothers School at Westland Row. He never seems at ease in photos taken with other people. Presumably this awkwardness stemmed from self-consciousness about a squint in one of his eyes. It is remarkable that from his teenage years he rarely allowed himself to be photographed in any other way than in profile. In retrospect it seems that he carefully controlled how the camera and posterity would see him and in that context it is curious that the profile is associated with the depiction of heroic figures."

Patrick Pearse, poet and the revolutionist | The Irish Catholic
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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He looks contemplative more than dreamy as such. In all his photos he looks contemplative but an air of fierceness enters into that increasingly as he grew older.

I'm very serious that if he was one theirs the Russians would have Glorified him as a Saint and I think they would be correct and just to do so. However if you raised that concept in Ireland the only serious support you would probably get is from RSF sympathizers in Donegal. He was such a brilliant example of what humans are meant to be. Looking on that photograph you posted makes me melancholic knowing that I will never attain to such purity and yet at the same time fills me with joy because despite he not only lived but walked streets that I have walked and not so long ago at that.
 

Ire-land

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He looks contemplative more than dreamy as such. In all his photos he looks contemplative but an air of fierceness enters into that increasingly as he grew older.

I'm very serious that if he was one theirs the Russians would have Glorified him as a Saint and I think they would be correct and just to do so. However if you raised that concept in Ireland the only serious support you would probably get is from RSF sympathizers in Donegal. He was such a brilliant example of what humans are meant to be. Looking on that photograph you posted makes me melancholic knowing that I will never attain to such purity and yet at the same time fills me with joy because despite he not only lived but walked streets that I have walked and not so long ago at that.
Very well put. And I don't doubt you're right with your point about if he were Russian. It's a definite melancholy that it fills me with, but also a pride in what it means to be Irish, and, as you say, walk the streets he walked. It's all part of the heartbreak I'm experiencing these days.

It's interesting for me to find out that he was so self conscious about his eyes- even in profile, I've always been struck by their intensity and purpose. Some men have a sort indifference in their eyes, if that makes sense, where you just know that they won't be swayed. He had that.
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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Very well put. And I don't doubt you're right with your point about if he were Russian. It's a definite melancholy that it fills me with, but also a pride in what it means to be Irish, and, as you say, walk the streets he walked. It's all part of the heartbreak I'm experiencing these days.

It's interesting for me to find out that he was so self conscious about his eyes- even in profile, I've always been struck by their intensity and purpose. Some men have a sort indifference in their eyes, if that makes sense, where you just know that they won't be swayed. He had that.
The saying the eyes are the mirror of the soul is very true. You can only really tell a person when you look into their in the flesh but with someone people even it shows in photographs and he was most definitely one of them.
 

Ire-land

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The saying the eyes are the mirror of the soul is very true. You can only really tell a person when you look into their in the flesh but with someone people even it shows in photographs and he was most definitely one of them.
Yeah, some people are just bursting with the energy of living, and of life itself. People talk about aura, or people lighting up a room, as if it's possibly not a real thing- I often think our faith in education blinds us to the possibility of given gifts. Not everything can be taught, and especially not the best of things. I'm not sure where I'm going with this thought tbh, but some people have a magic that isn't possible to bottle or prescribe, it's given to the few.
 

Myles O'Reilly

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P.H. Pierce [Pádraig Pearse] whistled as he came out of the cell (after taking a sad farewell of his wife.) [Pearse wasn’t married, and was visited only by a Capuchin priest, Fr Aloysius.
You sure Fr Aloysius wasn't his wife dressed up as a priest, Ms Catherine?
 

Ire-land

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You are indeed in a bad way these days Sir. I commented previously that I wanted you to try and relax yourself because I was concerned at how excitable you often get. Its definitely not good for the heart or indeed the head. I don't really have any suggestions because I don't know your situation but walking through the woods just after its stopped raining for example might be better than retracing Pearse's steps at this point in time. You're doing yourself no favours dude.
I wish I could get myself to think less of you, Myles. I wonder if you're just a charmer?
 

Myles O'Reilly

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This is a wee prayer I used to recite in times of uncertainty Sir Happykkkiii

Do not worry over what to eat,
what to wear or put on your feet.
Trust and pray, go do your best today,
then leave it in the hands of the Lord.
 
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Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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I have a sense that a lot of people, including Republicans, in contemporary Ireland are very uncomfortable with Pearse due to the purity of his soul.

Yes, our latterday Republicans feel a lot more comfortable with Connolly - though with a very dumbed down and Disneyfied version of him. Apparently James Connolly died for gay marriage and abortion for all.
 
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