Magic and Demons

Casstiel

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#1
Lots of truth in this, though some of the "tricks" are actual tricks and not real spiritual manifestations, but a lot of them are both "tricks" assisted by demons as well as psychic powers (not all "supernatural abilities" are "demonic" of course):



View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=300&v=_-AZkPGMvL8


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mI7uHI1x09A


There are many forms of energy ones can use. Most of it takes years of practice though, even one specific ability itself can take years (lets say levitation or telekinesis) and many take the "short route" through black magic and demonic assistance. You can of course also use white magick, high magick, without demonic influence but rather own inner abilities and angelic magic to gain different positive manifestations and quick results. However many of the top magicians have chosen the darker path and quicker short cut through black magic and demonic assistance. You can even see it in their faces and eyes the darkness within them.
 

rightthented

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#3
That face changing trick in the first video is bloody strange, either a fantastic trick or demonic posession!
 

rightthented

Political Irish
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#4
That face changing trick in the first video is bloody strange, either a fantastic trick or demonic posession!
 
Joined
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#5
Lots of truth in this, though some of the "tricks" are actual tricks and not real spiritual manifestations, but a lot of them are both "tricks" assisted by demons as well as psychic powers (not all "supernatural abilities" are "demonic" of course)..
What is a spiritual manifestation?

The Ghost Dances:

Wovoka reportedly was taken into the spirit world, where he saw dead ancestors alive and well and saw all natives being taken up into the sky. The earth swallowed up all whites, and all dead Indians were resurrected to enjoy a world free of their conquerors. The natives, along with their ancestors, were put back upon the earth to live in peace.

He also claimed that he received instructions from God that by dancing the Round Dance continuously, the dream would become a reality and the participants would enjoy the new Earth. Wovoka's teachings followed the 1870 tradition that predicted a Paiute renaissance. A central doctrine of the Ghost Dance, as preached by Wovoka, involved reuniting the living and the dead. The return of the dead would be accompanied by a glorious return of traditional Indian culture. Wovoka began to prophesy around 1888.

In 1890, on the Walker River Indian reservation in Nevada, Wovoka revived the Ghost Dance. His message of a new golden age was received with enthusiasm, and it spread quickly among the Great Basin and Great Plains tribes. Many tribes sent delegates to visit Wovoka, hear his message, and receive instructions for the dance. Throughout the year 1890, the Ghost Dance was performed, stimulating anticipation of a return of the old ways.

Wovoka stopped teaching the Ghost Dance between 1891 and 1892, owing to the sorrow he felt by the misinterpretation of his vision by other Indians, particularly the Lakota.

Among the Lakota:


The most enthusiastic supporters of the new movement were the Lakota. Its spread to Lakota reservations coincided with a period of intense suffering there.

Kicking Bear, a Miniconjou Teton Lakota, along with Short Bull, a Miniconjou mystic, made a pilgrimage to Nevada to learn about the new dance. Kicking Bear brought the Ghost Dance back to the Pine Ridge reservation. Kicking Bear gave an entirely different interpretation of Wovoka’s message. Unlike Wovoka's anti-violence, the Ghost Dance took on a militaristic aspect and emphasized the possible elimination of the whites.

In its Lakota version, after opening invocations, prayers, and exhortations, the dancers joined hands and began a frenetic circle dance. Many who were sick participated in the hope of being cured, and many fell down, sometimes unconscious, sometimes in a trance, as the dance progressed. Eventually the dancing stopped and the participants sat in a circle, relating their experiences and visions. The dance might be repeated.

When the dance spread to the Lakota, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) agents became alarmed. They claimed that the Lakota had developed a militaristic approach to the dance, and began making "ghost shirts" they believed would protect them from bullets. In early October 1890, Kicking Bear visited Sitting Bull at the Standing Rock reservation. He told him of the visit he had made to Nevada to visit Wovoka, and of the great number of other Indians who were there as well.

Aftermath:

As news of Wounded Knee spread throughout the Native nations, the Ghost Dance died quickly. Wovoka's prophecies were empty; the land would not be returned from the white man through divine intervention. When it became obvious that ghost shirts did not protect their wearers from bullets, and the expected resurrection of the dead had not occurred, most believers quit the dance.


With the suddenness of its birth, the Ghost Dance disappeared. The Wounded Knee massacre put an end to the Ghost Dance as a widespread phenomenon. It was continued in several isolated places, but the expectation of the imminent return of the dead and of traditional culture was minimized. The last known Ghost Dances were held in the 1950s among the Shoshone.

www.u-s-history.com/pages/h3775.html

Are we witnessing a rebirth of the Ghost Dances?


 
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