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Lenition of 's' in Gaulish

Tadhg Gaelach

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As we all know, 's' takes a séimhiú in certain circumstances in Irish. This paper examines the evidence for similar lenition of the the letter 's' in Gaulish inscriptions.

 

TW Tone

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That's above my pay grade.
However, I do know that the author, David Stifter of NUIM is Austrian.
I heard that when he got the Old Irish job at Maynooth he knew no Modern Irish and had to learn it.

I guess he continues in the old Germanic keltische tradition of Kuno Meyer and others whose names I have forgotten. Jespersen?

The kinds of immigrants who bring, rather than take.
 
OP
Tadhg Gaelach

Tadhg Gaelach

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That's above my pay grade.
However, I do know that the author, David Stifter of NUIM is Austrian.
I heard that when he got the Old Irish job at Maynooth he knew no Modern Irish and had to learn it.

I guess he continues in the old Germanic keltische tradition of Kuno Meyer and others whose names I have forgotten. Jespersen?

The kinds of immigrants who bring, rather than take.


Stifter has an incredible output. I have his Old Irish For Beginners at home. Very well thought out and presented. I'd say you're thinking of Thurneysen, who wrote the Grammar of Old Irish. That's an outstanding work for any language. Completed in Berlin as the bombs were falling in 1945.
 
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the parallels between the wacky grammar of irish and the wacky grammar of Breton are all there to behold.

And the vocab is all oh so similar.

in irish boxing is 'Dornaileacht'. The Breton for Hand/Fist is Dorn.

almost identical in Both.

both languages struggle to get around the verb 'to have'.
 
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A Voice

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Stifter has an incredible output. I have his Old Irish For Beginners at home. Very well thought out and presented. I'd say you're thinking of Thurneysen, who wrote the Grammar of Old Irish. That's an outstanding work for any language. Completed in Berlin as the bombs were falling in 1945.
He's a big Joy Division fan. Random factoid.
 
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