Julian Assange - Should be set free, says the UN.

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#15
And Korea and Germany... I remember working in South Hessen state in '90-'91, and the behavior of U.S. soldiers in towns like Babenhausen, Darmstadt and Offenbach was notorious. We acquitted ourselves poorly overseas, and it didn't have to be that way.
That's all that medication, bro.
 
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#16
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#17
Assange is quite stuck AFAIK. Because even if the Swedish charges are withdrawn, he's still caught on jumping bail. More than enough time for the Americans to swoop in on him.

Assange is very good and isn't afraid to punch right and left. He doesn't do the kind of virtue signalling that even good independent journalists sometimes fall into.

I don't think Trump will rescue him at the end of the day. Some leftfield thing like Corbyn winning is the only thing I can see on the horizon that could win Assange's liberty.
 
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#18

Tadhg Gaelach

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#19

A friend of mine was seriously assaulted by a rogue Garda in Dublin a couple of years ago, which resulted in severe injuries to his face and back. He was arrested and brought to the nearest Garda station. A doctor was called and a medical report filled in by the doctor. When my friend attempted to sue the Gardaí over the assault - the medical report amazingly disappeared into the ether.
 
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#20
A friend of mine was seriously assaulted by a rogue Garda in Dublin a couple of years ago, which resulted in severe injuries to his face and back. He was arrested and brought to the nearest Garda station. A doctor was called and a medical report filled in by the doctor. When my friend attempted to sue the Gardaí over the assault - the medical report amazingly disappeared into the ether.
*cough* CIA torture tapes *cough*
 
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#23
It's not the responsibility of the UN to secure his freedom. The inept Australian government could have done it easily. A quiet chat in a room demanding his charges are dropped. If that didn't work, shove your F35's up your arse as long as you are a threat to our citizen. They are not patriots, they are puppets of the US.
 
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#24
Conspiracy emerges to push Julian Assange into British and US hands

The Guardian has published unsubstantiated allegations that Assange “violated” the embassy’s communications system and “apparently” read “confidential diplomatic traffic.” In a tweet, WikiLeaks emphatically denied the accusation and pointed to its source, saying: “That’s an anonymous libel aligned with the current UK-US government onslaught against Mr Assange’s asylum—while he can’t respond.”

There is no doubt about the intent of the latest allegations. Guardian opinion writer James Ball was blunt. The WikiLeaks’ founder, Ball asserted, “should hold his hands up and leave the embassy.”

The Guardian’s lead article declared: “If he walks out of the embassy, he can expect arrest and could spend up to a year in prison for breaking his bail conditions. The US might then seek to extradite him. He would contest any attempt, and might win, but would face a long, uncomfortable spell behind bars while his case is decided.”

Earlier this year, Ecuador’s president, Lenín Moreno, who took office last May, stated that Assange was a costly “inherited problem” and a “hacker,” and made it clear that he viewed Assange as an obstacle to better relations with the US.
It's clear that the US has nobbled Ecuador's new president :(

Rafael Correa, Moreno’s predecessor, recently told journalists in Madrid that Assange’s “days were numbered” because Moreno, his former protégé, would “throw him out of the embassy at the first pressure from the United States.”

Since his election, Moreno has carried out a sharp turn to the right, with tax cuts for big business, cuts in social spending and attempts to reduce Ecuador’s dependence on loans and investment from China in favour of closer relations with US imperialism.
Pilger pointed to the accommodation that Moreno was seeking with Washington, which has been aggressively moving against any government in Latin America regarded as an obstacle to US hegemony over the continent.

“It’s quite clear that this government has deferred to the United States because it cut off Julian’s contacts—all Internet, all phone, all visitors apart from food and lawyers on the day that US Southcom deputy commander General Joseph DiSalvo arrived in Quito, Ecuador to renegotiate a US base that Correa had shut down.”

The Guardian based its unverified accusations against Assange on “secret records” it had “seen,” together with Focus Ecuador, a right-wing website. It charged that Ecuador’s intelligence agency “bankrolled a multi-million-dollar spy operation” to “protect” Assange in the embassy. Over six years, this activity had cost $5 million.

A closer examination of the story, however, indicates that the surveillance was conducted primarily against Assange and WikiLeaks. A security firm watched Assange around the clock and installed CCTV cameras throughout the embassy.

“Operation Guest” logged every visitor that Assange had for six years, and spied on his every movement in the tiny embassy, monitoring his mood, habits and sleeping patterns, the Guardian reported. Agents recorded each visitor’s purpose of visit, their passport information and arrival and departure times.

“Every month, the security company sent a confidential list of Assange’s visitors to the Ecuadorian president,” the newspaper stated. “Sometimes, the company included stills from secret video footage of interesting guests, plus profiles and analysis.”

According to the Guardian, this possibly offered “clues as to who gave him the trove of hacked documents that helped to bring down Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election.” It ominously stated that such a “visitor” would “interest” US special counsel Robert Mueller, who heads an investigation into the Trump administration’s alleged links to Russia.

According to the newspaper, the FBI has already interviewed “at least one source close to Operation Guest,” indicating that Ecuador has handed over all its records to the US intelligence agencies. As a result, every person who has visited or communicated with Assange while he has been in the embassy is at risk of persecution and, potentially, frame-up charges of complicity in espionage or seeking to manipulate the 2016 US election.
Looks like Julian Assange's days are numbered :(
 
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