Is Google Stadia the future of gaming?

DS86DS

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It has been suggested that Google Stadia will be "the Netflix of Gaming ".

Stadia developers have stated that their new digital streaming service to be released in November this year will promise up to 4K gaming at 60 FPS without the need for a console or gaming PC.

It has been said that Google Stadia promises to deliver a digital streaming gaming service on par with top end gaming PC's in graphics on performance across a variety of mediums including tablets, phones and television through the use of Chromecast.

What do you make of this, is this feasible given where we stand in relation to current internet speeds and data caps?

I love this concept, and the idea that PC games could be played on tablets and televisions. However, I'd worry about the bandwidth and data requirements such a service would require. In theory one would be best thinking about Gigabit broadband with actual unlimited usage without data caps.

And yes, I hate Google more than anybody......but I'm hoping this will bring about a revolution in gaming. Hopefully in time there will be companies like Steam offering a superior sevice....and with many more smaller companies to follow.

I have an Xbox One X, and the thought of not having to invest in a future console or high end gaming PC worth well over a €1,000 is an interesting prospect. Again I hate Google, but I'm hoping this could be the beginning of a revolution in gaming.

 

jon 1000's of irish f

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It has been suggested that Google Stadia will be "the Netflix of Gaming ".

Stadia developers have stated that their new digital streaming service to be released in November this year will promise up to 4K gaming at 60 FPS without the need for a console or gaming PC.

It has been said that Google Stadia promises to deliver a digital streaming gaming service on par with top end gaming PC's in graphics on performance across a variety of mediums including tablets, phones and television through the use of Chromecast.

What do you make of this, is this feasible given where we stand in relation to current internet speeds and data caps?

I love this concept, and the idea that PC games could be played on tablets and televisions. However, I'd worry about the bandwidth and data requirements such a service would require. In theory one would be best thinking about Gigabit broadband with actual unlimited usage without data caps.

And yes, I hate Google more than anybody......but I'm hoping this will bring about a revolution in gaming. Hopefully in time there will be companies like Steam offering a superior sevice....and with many more smaller companies to follow.

I have an Xbox One X, and the thought of not having to invest in a future console or high end gaming PC worth well over a €1,000 is an interesting prospect. Again I hate Google, but I'm hoping this could be the beginning of a revolution in gaming.

where is it?
 

NotPC

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No it won't. As you mentioned bandwidth is the main issue in online gaming!!!! I have my self build high end PC for gaming and I won't be changing any time soon for some shitty service from a crowd of anti conservative bastards like google.
 

Superhans

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First time I have heard of this, PS5 and the new Xbox are released Christmas 2020, Everyone is awaiting them. Stadia relies on perfect Internet speeds, good luck with that!
 

jon 1000's of irish f

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they say it will work over 5g. but there will be issues at peak times. i wish i could get a 7nm slim laptop for gaming under 1000. i think AMD wil help do it next year. otherwise ps5. i love high quality aaa with great lighting. watched the xbox one x over the last year improve graphics greatly. oled tv's (55') would love 65' or even 75') are a dream for gaming! just kicked ass on froza 7 with my rally rs2000 ford escort mk1. living the dream virtually :)
 

NotPC

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Reality is that most people using this thing, if they do, will be at a reduced resolution, 4k isnt worth a fuck if your game textures of the game or tv cant distinguish anyway, let alone bandwidth and so actual data sent will be very dependent on a lot of things.

One of many questions is data centres, as obviously if the console/pc isn't there to generate the graphics/game on your end, its being done on the server itself, so lots of new hardware to be built.

A surge in demand will drive the need for even more data centers, and more centers will inevitably drive up power consumption. The industry-wide numbers are alarming. U.S. data centers used over 90 billion kilowatt-hours in 2017, with worldwide consumption estimated above 200 terawatt-hours. The most extreme estimates fear data centers could account for 20 percent of all global energy consumption by 2025.
And here i thought we were trying to save the planet, not add more electricity costs and increase our carbon footprints, but thats with tazes on the plebs are for.



Say hello to more carbon taxes and higher esb bills to pay to subsidise these companies.

Alarmingly, the largest gains in total power draw take place on the most efficient devices. Google boasts that Stadia, which uses a custom AMD chip, can deliver 10.7 teraflops of total compute power – several times that of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. Yet that device could simply be accessed on a Google Pixel phone or Chromecast streaming device. Evans found that was dramatic in his research, saying the “’worst-case’ would actually be a media-streaming device (like Nvidia Shield), which pulls only 10 watts or so in the home, yet requires many hundreds of watts of power upstream.”

That represents a huge increase in per-session power draw yet, at the same time, gives gamers reason to think they’re making a more responsible decision. The environmental costs are physically moved away from a gamer’s home and to the data center, a place that’s tightly controlled by its owner and located many miles away. Gamers might notice they’re using less power at home and conclude that cloud gaming is a win-win.

And not all the power goes to rendering a game in lavish detail at the data center. At least some of it also goes to the network needed to push the data cross from a data center to your home. The largest tech companies, including Google, have vast private networks that specialize in delivering huge amounts of data to users. They’re highly effective. Their reliability and speed make modern video streaming possible. However, they have their own infrastructure, which also sucks down electricity.

To Dr. Mills, this is the hidden variable that most people don’t consider. “In our calculations for PC cloud gaming, the datacenter is responsible for about 340 Watts of power per user and the network an additional 180 watts,” he says.

The exact numbers can shift depending on the device used to stream, the network bandwidth required, the distance data must travel, the efficiency of the data center powering the cloud gaming service, and many other factors. There’s no way for a user of any streaming service, whether it serves up games, video, or anything else, to know how much power the convenience demands.

Only one thing is plain, definitive, and transparent; the numbers never shift in a way that lets cloud gaming use less power than local gaming, and there’s no clear path towards making that a reality.

Yes, data centers are becoming more efficient. But to Greenpeace’s Cook, efficiency can become its own sort of curse. “Your per unit, per gigabyte energy required to deliver that may go down, but the overall level of consumption continues to go up. And it actually goes significantly up,” he says. “In some ways, the efficiency enables more consumption.”

That’s a core problem that spans all human innovation. Stadia, like video streaming before it, and the world wide web before that, is possible thanks to vast improvements in efficiency. But making a service easier and less expensive to access inevitably drives demand, and that demand often dwarfs what efficiency can offset. Cloud gaming will be no different.
No different to the EU and their lack of belief in their AGW bullshit or they don't care, as they try to import more and more from further and further away if it benefits them economically or politically. This is just increasing the complexity of the systems we are driving, and the impact once you go past certain thresholds, costs get exponential. The tards using this will think they are saving the planet as they are only using an ipad/tv now instead of a console, as the data centre is outside their home, and so can lead themselves to think they are actually saving the planet.


Another thing, this ain't going to be cheap if ye want to play all the games, as obviously they have only a certain access to catalogs out there, and it will be a while before they are creating anything.

Ubisoft has also confirmed that its Uplay Plus subscription service is coming to Stadia in 2020. More details weren’t forthcoming, but the PC version of the service delivers access to over 100 games for $14.99 a month.
Just like all these new streaming services, every fucker out there will be looking for their cut to get your money through accessing their catalog.
Also more furthering the push for people owning nothing, or if they do own it, can only play it through this service, let alone ever holding a physical copy of anything ever again that you handed over your money for. At least with gog you don't have all the drm, or steam or console you can download it, and say goodboy to ever playing anything again offline if this crap ever takes on and creates another monopoly or the rest follow.


One issue where gaming was going i see they are looking at, split screen on consoles. The PC master race has always been different, more solo orientated and has online as default if needed. But regards consoles, starting with xbox, we saw the introduction of voice and multiplayer being more online as well, rather then lads sitting on a sofa with 4 controllers on a split screen. Split screen was the great thing about the consoles, and then they started to look like a knockoff pc, and now its all online.

According to Erin Hoffman-John, lead researcher for Google Stadia, split-screen gaming has been largely ignored due to the processing power requirements needed to run two different games concurrently. Of course, this isn’t such an issue for a streaming platform such as Stadia!
So they do support split screen, but each split is an instance in itself, lots of power use, you each need a screen, 4 logins i assume, and the bandwidth to handle all that information, let alone games that support it. I think i'll pass.
 

SwordOfStCatherine

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I have an Xbox One X, and the thought of not having to invest in a future console or high end gaming PC worth well over a €1,000 is an interesting prospect. Again I hate Google, but I'm hoping this could be the beginning of a revolution in gaming.
Seriously when I opened this thread and read the OP I literally cursed out loud. You open a thread moaning about how none of the marriages you know are patriarchal enough for your tastes and than post this nonsense which would only barely acceptable for teenaged boy. What age are you and you an XBox and yet claim to be some upright nationalist type, and even if I a remember correctly a Christian? And you think it is acceptable for an adult male to waste hours at time on hypnotic infantilism? No woman worth her salt would marry trash who play with Xboxs as an adult, and particularly not one who was looking for a "truly traditional" patriarch. This is the problem with men such as yourself- you want all honours of patriarchy but none of the duties. You have not even bothered to take on the duty of fully embracing adulthood.
 

jon 1000's of irish f

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It's already here depending on where you live. I have it and it's great, huge amount of bandwidth I never get even close to using. I get a constant 940mbps down and 200mbps up all day every day, it never drops below that.
sounds great i have only experienced 100mbs.
 
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