Hot Irish Battles

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#62
When you say confederates and government is that Royalist against parliamentarians(cavaliers against roundheads)as in the English civil war?
It's your choice to see everything through a prism of what goes on in England or you can look at it from an Irish perspective :)
 
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#63
Strange that we made a fuss about biafra a few years later, same kind of situation as katanga.

We had only been allowed to join the UN at the end of 1955, so had some catching up to do and didn't ask any questions.
We still don't, as 'willing' members of the US empire, we do what we are told.
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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#64
The Battle of Scarrifholis, 21/6/1650.

An Irish Confederate army sought battle with the Parliamentarian army and came across them at a townland two miles outside Letterkenny.

The Parliamentarian army was made up of both New Model army troops and British Ulster settlers. It was commanded by Sir Charles Coote. The Cootes were fine soldiers. I first came across his father Charles Snr when researching local Fingal history where he had beaten off a rebel attack in Swords and then decisively defeated them a few miles west at Kilsallaghan in the same conflict. He was killed a few weeks later during a Confederate counter attack at Trim. Coote Junior was captured by the Irish after being overrun in the Curragh but was released in 1643 amid the ceasefire and then during 1645 he managed to occupy most of north-west Ulster.

The Irish commander was a Bishop called Heber McMahon. McMahon had little military experience and his army of 4,000 strong were short on ammunition and were mostly armed with pikes rather than muskets. Coote had less men (roughly 3,000) but had more ammunition and cavalry.

Allegedly refusing to listen to military advise from his subordinates, McMahon moved his army from a strong hillside position down opposite the Parliamentarians and placed them in one huge solid mass. The more experienced Coote however drew up his men in smaller more flexible units - able to reinforce one another and to move around the battlefield.

The Battle began with both advance units engaging, with Coote steadily reinforcing his infantry thus driving the Irish back into their massed formation. Given the way McMahon had deployed his troops it had the effect of hemming the ranks into one another rendering them unable to move. Coote saw his chance and sent more infantry to attack the flanks of the Irish formation, trapping the entire force between his men and the mountain, which was their initial position of advantage which they descended from to engage Coote's troops. The Parliamentarians were thus able to fire volley after volley into the Irish ranks with little in the way of response.

After some time the cavalry and McMahon himself fled leaving the infantry to fight doggedly on until finally they were broken. The result was a rout with the Irish having 3,000 men killed - 75% of their entire force. McMahon was captured in Enniskillen and hanged and that was effectively the end of the Ulster army.



Memorial to the fallen

 
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#65
It's not a Battle - but a day to commemorate

16 September 1941: Sixteen Irish Officers & men were killed while training in the Glen of Imaal, County Wicklow on this day. The Glen was and still is the main training and testing ground for the Irish Army. At the time of the tragedy the State had expanded its Army to meet any threat of invasion from either side in the Second World War. The troops involved in that days training were from an anti aircraft battalion based in Kildare.



They were being instructed in the use of anti tank weapons. What quite what happened no one now knows. But a warning was shouted that ‘you have seven seconds’ which suggests that the officer handling the thing sensed something had gone horribly wrong - too late! While 16 officers and soldiers were killed another three men were blinded for life and one went deranged and shot a man to death.



Survivor Sergeant Richie Lennon described the fateful accident:



I heard the bang and I was carried was carried about 100 yards further...when I got up and went over you didn’t know who to render assistance to, it was an awful sight.



In 1958 a stained glass window commemorating the sixteen dead was installed in the Garrison Church in McKee Barracks. In September 1986, a memorial was unveiled in the Glen of Imaal, consisting of sixteen rick-stones and sixteen Mountain Ash trees arranged in a semi-circle around a 14 ton basalt monolith. A polished granite plaque on the monolith names the dead:



Lt John Brierton
Lt John Fennessy
Lt Thomas O’Neill
Lt Michael McLoughlin
CS Patrick MacMahon
Sgt Michael Scullion
Sgt Thomas Stokes
Cpl Edward Kennedy
Cpl William Shannon
Cpl Denis Cleary
Cpl Colm Heffernan
Cpl John Taylor
Gnr John Murphy
Gnr James McDonnell
Gnr Gerard O’Hagan
Gnr James Osborne
 
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#67
It's not a Battle - but a day to commemorate

16 September 1941: Sixteen Irish Officers & men were killed while training in the Glen of Imaal, County Wicklow on this day. The Glen was and still is the main training and testing ground for the Irish Army. At the time of the tragedy the State had expanded its Army to meet any threat of invasion from either side in the Second World War. The troops involved in that days training were from an anti aircraft battalion based in Kildare.



They were being instructed in the use of anti tank weapons. What quite what happened no one now knows. But a warning was shouted that ‘you have seven seconds’ which suggests that the officer handling the thing sensed something had gone horribly wrong - too late! While 16 officers and soldiers were killed another three men were blinded for life and one went deranged and shot a man to death.



Survivor Sergeant Richie Lennon described the fateful accident:



I heard the bang and I was carried was carried about 100 yards further...when I got up and went over you didn’t know who to render assistance to, it was an awful sight.



In 1958 a stained glass window commemorating the sixteen dead was installed in the Garrison Church in McKee Barracks. In September 1986, a memorial was unveiled in the Glen of Imaal, consisting of sixteen rick-stones and sixteen Mountain Ash trees arranged in a semi-circle around a 14 ton basalt monolith. A polished granite plaque on the monolith names the dead:



Lt John Brierton
Lt John Fennessy
Lt Thomas O’Neill
Lt Michael McLoughlin
CS Patrick MacMahon
Sgt Michael Scullion
Sgt Thomas Stokes
Cpl Edward Kennedy
Cpl William Shannon
Cpl Denis Cleary
Cpl Colm Heffernan
Cpl John Taylor
Gnr John Murphy
Gnr James McDonnell
Gnr Gerard O’Hagan
Gnr James Osborne
The last serious incident involving an Army exercise on a shooting range occurred on May 26th, 1977, when five soldiers were killed an explosion at the Glen of Imaal, Co Wicklow. They were on a training exercise involving 81mm mortars.

They had been practice-firing the mortars, which are capable of throwing a 7lb shell, packed with TNT, over a distance of 3,400 yards.


Mortar bombs are designed to arm themselves after they are fired, and once they have achieved a specific velocity. On hitting the ground they explode, scattering shrapnel over a radius of at least 300 yards.

Mortar crews consist of five soldiers, one of whom has the task of loading the bomb into the firing tube.

The Wicklow explosion 20 years ago was the worst military accident since 16 officers and men died in the same area during a landmine demonstration in 1941.

One of five soldiers injured in explosion may lose her hand
 
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#70
The storming of Derrynard.

The assault would involve the use of two 12.7mm DShK machine guns, 11 AK-47s, different kinds of grenades, and a flamethrower. The bulk of the flying column would be driven to the checkpoint on a makeshift armoured truck. To assure widespread destruction, the column decided to detonate a van bomb after the initial surprise assault. The chosen target, a vehicle checkpoint at Derryard, near Rosslea, was manned by 8 soldiers of the 1st Battalion of the King’s Own Scottish Borderers regiment and a member of the RUC.
1989 – Attack on Derryard Checkpoint.
 
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#71


17 September 1860: Men of the Irish Battalion of St. Patrick of the Papal army fought a Piedmontese army under the command of General Brignone at Spoleto, Italy on this day. Spoleto is a walled city south of Florence with the fortress of Rocca on the side of a hill. Three companies of the Battalion of St. Patrick (312 soldiers & 15 officers) under the Battalion Commander, Major Myles O'Reilly (County Louth) were stationed there. Major O'Reilly commanded 645 men in total at Spoleto including 150 Italians, 160 Swiss, and 24 Franco-Belgians.



In spite of a long and heavy bombardment, the advancing Piedmontese troops were met with a withering fire by the Irish on the walls that stopped them in their tracks. However the bishop of Spoleto, distraught at the destruction and the loss of life, arranged a cease-fire. O'Reilly was nearly out of ammunition at that anyway. A Papal representative was sent to General Brignone and surrender terms were arranged. Brignone described O'Reilly as "both honourable and brave" and allowed the Irish to march out as prisoners with officers retaining their swords.



Given the task of protecting the North Wall and the vital Gate House of the majestic Castle Albornozian, the Irish performed with distinction, holding their ground and the gate for 14 hours despite heavy hand-to-hand fighting and under constant bombardment from General Brigonne's field artillery. After withstanding repeated attacks, Major O'Reilly eventually negotiated a favorable surrender when reinforcements had become unlikely.

http://www.thewildgeese.com/pages/popeirb2.html



For their service, each officer and enlisted man was awarded a commemorative service medal—Medaglia di Pro Petri Sede— 'Medal for the seat of Saint Peter' [above] and all those who fought were declared ‘meritorious of the Catholic Church, the Holy See and all human society’.
 

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#72


17 September 1860: Men of the Irish Battalion of St. Patrick of the Papal army fought a Piedmontese army under the command of General Brignone at Spoleto, Italy on this day. Spoleto is a walled city south of Florence with the fortress of Rocca on the side of a hill. Three companies of the Battalion of St. Patrick (312 soldiers & 15 officers) under the Battalion Commander, Major Myles O'Reilly (County Louth) were stationed there. Major O'Reilly commanded 645 men in total at Spoleto including 150 Italians, 160 Swiss, and 24 Franco-Belgians.



In spite of a long and heavy bombardment, the advancing Piedmontese troops were met with a withering fire by the Irish on the walls that stopped them in their tracks. However the bishop of Spoleto, distraught at the destruction and the loss of life, arranged a cease-fire. O'Reilly was nearly out of ammunition at that anyway. A Papal representative was sent to General Brignone and surrender terms were arranged. Brignone described O'Reilly as "both honourable and brave" and allowed the Irish to march out as prisoners with officers retaining their swords.



Given the task of protecting the North Wall and the vital Gate House of the majestic Castle Albornozian, the Irish performed with distinction, holding their ground and the gate for 14 hours despite heavy hand-to-hand fighting and under constant bombardment from General Brigonne's field artillery. After withstanding repeated attacks, Major O'Reilly eventually negotiated a favorable surrender when reinforcements had become unlikely.

http://www.thewildgeese.com/pages/popeirb2.html



For their service, each officer and enlisted man was awarded a commemorative service medal—Medaglia di Pro Petri Sede— 'Medal for the seat of Saint Peter' [above] and all those who fought were declared ‘meritorious of the Catholic Church, the Holy See and all human society’.
All a waste as time shows as neither Piedmont or The Papal States now exist. That is perhaps what makes it so interesting. The same could be said og the quad amputee of Iraq that I was watching about on facebook.
 
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