Hot Irish Battles

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#49
The city where I live in South America (10'000 kms from Ireland) was liberated from the Spanish in 1822. The city is festooned with monuments and plaques all honouring the General who led the Battle. Imagine my surprise to learn his name was O Leary,and he was born in County Cork.
Currently, he is buried in the same tomb as Simon Bolivar (the equivalent of George Washington in Latin america), to his immediate right.
We don't know half of the stuff our ancestors did around the world.
Daniel Florence O'Leary - Wikipedia

Finally an battle where the Irish won.
 

Dan Óg

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#50
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#51
The city where I live in South America (10'000 kms from Ireland) was liberated from the Spanish in 1822. The city is festooned with monuments and plaques all honouring the General who led the Battle. Imagine my surprise to learn his name was O Leary,and he was born in County Cork.
Currently, he is buried in the same tomb as Simon Bolivar (the equivalent of George Washington in Latin america), to his immediate right.
We don't know half of the stuff our ancestors did around the world.
Daniel Florence O'Leary - Wikipedia

Finally an battle where the Irish won.
The fighting Irish Diaspora

'Irish' named units of the Canadian Army


The Irish Canadian Rangers
The Irish Fusiliers of Canada (Vancouver Regiment)
The Irish Regiment of Canada
121st (Western Irish) Battalion, CEF
199th (Duchess of Connaught's Own Irish Rangers) Battalion, CEF
208th (Canadian Irish) Battalion, CEF
218th (Edmonton Irish Guards) Battalion, CEF

'Irish' named units of the French Army

In France between the 17th and 18th century there was over 35 Régiments named after Irish men such as Régiment de Athlone, Régiment de Clare, Régiment de Dublin, Régiment de Limerick and others named after people such as O'Gara's Dragoons and Régiment de Bourke.

In South Africa there was also a small number of units named after the Irish..

'Irish' named units in South Africa

Cape Town Irish Volunteer Rifles
South African Irish Regiment
Irish Boer commandos Irish Transvaal Brigade
2nd Irish Brigade

Apart from their participation in the Spanish Civil War Irish soldiers also formed Regiments in the 18th century which included the Dragones de Dublin..

'Irish' named units in Spain

Regimento de Infanteria de Hibernia (1705 - )
Regimento de Infanteria de Irlanda (1702 - )
Regimento de Infanteria de Limerick (1718 - )
Regimento de Infanteria de Waterford (1718 - )
Dragones de Dublin (1701–1722)

Irish soldiers who fought in South America

Bucket loads of British and American units are named after Irish soldiers which is common knowledge, but we also find a few notable Irish men fighting in South American Armys such as Argentina, Chile, Venezueala and others. Soldiers such as the "Father of the Argentine Navy" Willie Browne. Daniel Florencio O'Leary, who was aide de camp to Bolívar in Venezuela. The 1st Venezuelan Rifles was a nominally Irish regiment that took part in the Venezuelan War of Independence. It was Commanded by Colonel Donald Campbell who was Scottish.

In Chile we find Juan MacKenna the founder of the Military Corps of Engineers of the Chilean Army, Jorge O'Brien who was Captain of the Chilean Navy during the Chilean War of Independence, Ambrosio O'Higgins who was the Colonial administrator and military governor of Chile (1788–1796). Ambrosios son Bernardo O'Higgins was the first Chilean head of state (Supreme Director, 1817–23), who commanded the military forces that won independence from Spain. Then was have Patricio Lynch(18 December 1825 – 13 May 1886) who was a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy and a Rear Admiral in the Chilean navy, and one of the principal figures of the later stages of the War of the Pacific. He has been nicknamed the "Last Viceroy of Peru" and the Chinese slave-labourers he liberated from the Peruvian haciendas, called him the "Red Prince" because of his red-hair.

In the 17th century we had William Lamport from Wexford who was nicknamed El Zorro, the Fox, due to his exploits in Mexico. He changed his name to Guillén Lombardo. There was also the Saint Patrick's Battalion which was a unit of Irish immigrants that formed part of the Mexican Army during the Mexican-American War (1846–48).

The founder of the Uruguayan Navy was also an Irish man named Peter (Pedro) Campbell.

And of course there was also Ernesto "Che" Guevara Lynch. Sean O'Callaghan in his book To Hell or to Barbados also documents the Irish fighting in the Carribbean in uprisings in the 17th century, where they fought alongside the Afro-Carribbeans against the Redcoats. Ghost Dances by J. Mooney has a full-list in the index of the Irish who fought at Wounded Knee. At Little Big Horn dozens of Irish men lost their lives fighting and the best part of them where labourers who came from the five quarters of Ireland. - Two Unlikely Rebels: The Story of the Scandinavian Friends who ...
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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#52
Whilst not technically "Irish battles", the Irish contribution to the Royalist effort in Scotland was considerable during the wars of the three Kingdoms. What I've noticed in these wars is that it seems that the Royalist Irish sent their best soldiers to fight in Scotland and the Scotch Royalists sent their best soldiers to fight in Ireland!
The Irish expedition was headed by Alasdair McColla who's been credited with inventing the Irish or Highland charge. He linked up with the Royalist leader in Scotland, the Marquis of Montrose and they were soon in the thick of it. They were at the vanguard in every battle and were victorious in all but one. But they also pillaged and sacked all around them afterwards which gained them a deplorable reputation amongst the Scots civilians.

Ireland’s Wars: MacColla And Montrose In Scotland

Ireland’s Wars: Inverlochy And The Irish

Ireland’s Wars: The Irish And The “Annus Mirabilis”


Ultimately the Royalist cause in Scotland collapsed for numerous reasons and their end came at the Battle of Philiphaugh. What was left of their army (500 infantry and a few horse) was mainly Irish as the Highlanders had returned to defend their homesteads from Covenanter reprisals. They faced a force of 6,000 strong, almost entirely cavalry. The Covenanter attack in the misty morning took them completely by surprise. Wave after wave of cavalry fell upon the Royalists and they staunchly defended their positions for an hour before the inevitable rout took place. Most of the infantry were cut down but Manus O'Cahan and 100 of his men managed to make a further stand in a nearby farm. After vicious fighting an offer of clemency was given if they would lay down their arms which they accepted. But having surrendered the Covenanters fell on the Irish and butchered them to a man. And that was the end of the Irish Royalist campaign in Scotland.

Ireland’s Wars: Philiphaugh And The End Of The Irish In Scotland


The Battle of Philiphaugh

 
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#53
Whilst not technically "Irish battles", the Irish contribution to the Royalist effort in Scotland was considerable during the wars of the three Kingdoms. What I've noticed in these wars it that it seems that the Royalist Irish sent their best soldiers to fight in Scotland and the Scotch Royalists sent their best soldiers to fight in Ireland!
Pádraic Anraí Piarais-Mac Brádaigh-Mac Lachlann, Sinnsearan-Lachlann Mór-Tigh-na-Donnshléibhe, Sinnsearan-Ánrothán Ua Néill-Mac Noigíallach-Árd-Rí-na-hÉirinn-Dál Riata, Uachtarán Phoblact-na-hÉireann

'The McLoughlin family are the principal surviving relatives of the Pearses.' - E. Thornley, Patrick Pearse and the Pearse Family

I've uploaded a few more songs and stories to the Súil amháin ar an mbóthar - One eye on the road thread, including MacCrimmons Lament in both English and Gaelic. Margaret Bennett narrates the history of the songs:

'The setting is Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye, home to the Clan MacLeod for centuries and to their hereditary pipers, the famous MacCrimmons.'

'Accompanying Chief Norman MacLeod of MacLeod on the Hanoverian side of the rebellion, Donald Ban was captured in December at Inverurie by Jacobite forces, and such was his fame at the time, that the Jacobite pipers all went on strike to protest against his detention.'

Ireland’s Wars: Inverlochy And The Irish - 'In mid-September the army of James Graham, the Marquis of Montrose, was all triumphant in Scotland, having won two great and unexpected victories over its Covenanter foes. It had done so through effective use of the troops at its disposal, none less than the Ulster Irish contingent led by Alasdair MacColla.

But this army, despite the victory at Aberdeen, was still small, and still needed to pick its battles. In the aftermath of that clash and the sack of the city that followed, Montrose and MacColla were forced to head west to avoid a battle with the forces of the Marquis of Argyll, the head of the much hated Campbell clan.'

100 odd years later:

Clan MacLachlan and the Jacobite Rebellion

The Early Rebellions

1689 - The MacLachlans were loyal Jacobites and are said to have been with Bonnie Dundee at the Battle of Killiecrankie.

1715 - Lachlan MacLachlan of that Ilk, the 16th Chief, signed the address of Welcome to the Old Chevalier, the rightful King James VIII Stuart, on his landing in Scotland and served as a Colonel with the Earl of Mar. It is said that for this act, Campbell of Ardkinglas followed Lachlan MacLachlan for years before shooting him to death.

The '45 - The Last Rebellion

1745 - With support from Kenneth MacLachlan of Keilaneuchanich (the Glasrie property near Dunadd), who was appointed Adjunct to the company, the MacLachlans were able to field a band of over 100 Highlanders when they joined Prince Charles at Holyrood in Edinburgh.

A garrison of the Argyll Militia occupied Castle Lachlan during the '45 Rebellion. The Chief's family was forced to abandon their home and take refuge with the Stewarts of Appin.

The Aftermath of the Rebellion

Retributive measures imposed by the government after the defeat at Culloden caused the dead Chief's property to be confiscated for his part in the rebellion. Castle Lachlan was destroyed when the Argyll Militia vacated the structure.

The lands were returned to Robert MacLachlan of MacLachlan, the 18th Chief, on the 18th of November, 1749.

Around 1790, many Highlanders were forced to leave their homelands when the Lairds of the various estates switched from tenant farming to raising sheep. Donald MacLachlan of MacLachlan, out of compassion for his tenants and Clansfolk, built the village of Ballure (or Newton) to enable his former tenants to become crofters and fishermen and stay in the land of their birth. - Clan MacLachlan and the Jacobite Rebellion
 
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Myles O'Reilly

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#54
I thought I might start a thread about Irish battles and see what folk might come up with over the months to come.

I'll kick it off with the Battle of Portlester in 1643 where Owen Roe's Confederates drove off a Government force commanded by Lord Moore. Lord Moore was killed by a cannon ball reportedly fired by the O'Neill himself. Portlester is a townland near the village of Ballivor in western Co Meath. There was apparently once a castle here but its just farmland now.


There's a new battle being fought in Ballivor. This time its against the Scientologists

Addicts in Scientology-linked centre to be treated with saunas and vitamins
 

Dan Óg

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#55
There's a new battle being fought in Ballivor. This time its against the Scientologists

Addicts in Scientology-linked centre to be treated with saunas and vitamins
Is this a joke or a test of the new site rules.

Are you telling me there is a crowd of hillbillies in a place called Meath and the only thing worrying them is a crowd of ScientologistS trying to cure addicts.

They are probably building a mosque there across the field and are loving it.

These people should be gelded
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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#56
100 years ago this month spelled the end of the 16th Irish Division and all but the end of the 36th Ulster. Since the rebellion back in Ireland the British Army top brass looked on the largely nationalist 16th with suspicion (unfounded as it turned out) and had started to break it up. What was left of it took the full force of the German onslaught in Operation Michael.

There have been accusations of an undercurrent of sectarianism toward Irish Catholic/Nationalist soldiery at that time. Arch Unionist Sir Henry Wilson of Curragh Mutiny fame, inspecting the Division over Christmas 1915 noted that "Johnnie Redmond's pets appear to be inferior" and that "at least half of them are quite useless, old whiskey-sodden militiamen" while going on to praise the largely Unionist 36th. Subsequent efforts of high command tried to lay blame on the 16th for much of the disorganised retreat of the BEF during the 1918 German offensive but have since been found to be thoroughly unfounded. In fact, along with their northern counterparts, the two Irish divisions took more casualties than any other attempting to quell the German advance.

In the end the 16th ceased to exist as an Irish Division and its battalions were dispersed throughout the army. The 36th was so badly beaten up that it was sent to the rear to try and convalesce as best it could.

Ireland’s Wars: The Last Fight Of The 16th Division

“The heroic dead of Ireland have every right to the homage of the living; for they proved in some of the heaviest fighting of the world war that the unconquerable spirit of the Irish race, the spirit that has placed them among the world’s greatest soldiers, still lives and is stronger than ever it was. I had occasion to put to the test the valour of the Irishmen serving in France, and, whether they were Irishmen from the North or the South, or from one party or another, they did not fail me.

Some of the hardest fighting in the terrible days that followed the last offensive of the Germans fell to the Irishmen, and some of their splendid regiments had to endure ordeals that might justly have taxed to breaking point the capacity of the finest troops in the world. Never once did the Irish fail me in those terrible days. On the Somme, in 1916, I saw the heroism of the Irishmen of the North and South, and arrived on the scene shortly after the death of that very gallant Irish gentleman Major William Redmond. I saw Irishmen of the North and the South forget their age-long differences and fight side by side, giving their lives freely for the common cause.

In war there are times when the necessity for yielding up one’s life is the most urgent duty of the moment, and there were many such moments in our long-drawn out struggle. Those Irish heroes gave their lives freely, and, in honouring them on Sunday, I hope we shall not allow our grief to let us forget our pride in the glorious heroism of these men. They have left to those who come after a glorious heritage and an inspiration to duty that will live long after their names are forgotten.

France will never forget her debt to the heroic Irish dead and in the hearts of the French people today their memory lives as that of the memory of the heroes of old, preserved in the tales that the old people tell to their children and their children’s children. In the critical days of the German offensive , when it was necessary that lives should be sacrificed by the thousand to slow down the rush of the enemy, in order that our harassed forces should have time to reform, it was on the Irish that we relied repeatedly to make these desperate stands, and we found them respond always.

Again and again, when forlorn hopes were necessary to delay the enemy’s advance, it was the Irish who were ready for these, and at all times the soldiers of Ireland fought with the rare courage and determination that has always characterised the race on the battlefield. Some of the flower of the Irish chivalry rests in the cemeteries that have been reserved in France, and the French people will always have these reminders of the debt that France owes to Irish valour.

We shall always see that the graves of these heroes from across the sea are lovingly tended and we shall try to ensure that the generations that come after us shall never forget the heroic dead of Ireland.”

- The supreme Allied Commander Marshal Ferdinand Foch, November 10th, 1928




A cross of sacrifice was unveiled in Glasnevin Cemetary in 2014 dedicated to the fifty thousand Irish soliders who fell in the Great War.

A moving tune at 46 mins:

 
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McTell

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#59
Those fools should have stayed at home and minded their business. Katanga should have been an independent state.

Strange that we made a fuss about biafra a few years later, same kind of situation as katanga.

We had only been allowed to join the UN at the end of 1955, so had some catching up to do and didn't ask any questions.
 

Catalpa

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#60
13 September 908 AD: The Battle of Belach Mugna/Cath Belach Mugna was fought on this day. (Bellaghmoon, in the south of modern County Kildare). In this engagement the Bishop-King of Cashel, King Cormac mac Cuilennáin, was thoroughly defeated while trying to extract tribute from the King of Leinster [Laigan]. He invaded the Leinster territory expecting an easy victory but the King of Tara, one Flann Sinna of the southern O’Neills, was not prepared to see the land of Leinster under anyone’s thumb but his own. In alliance with the King of Connacht he led a relief expedition into Leinster and in a great battle the combined forces of Connacht, Leinster and the O’Neills of Meath routed the forces of King Cormac who was unhorsed and beheaded.

The Munster men entered the battle at a distinct numerical disadvantage of which they were acutely aware of. Information had reached their camp in the woods that King Flann Sinna of Tara had brought his army south to reinforce King Cerball, King of Leinster . This was in order to ward off the threat to this kingdom. In addition King Cathal of Connacht came from the west with his host to support Flann Sinna, who he acknowledged as his High King. It looks like the Munstermen came out of their wooded enclosure and formed up for battle with the Wood at their backs. This may well have been a deliberate tactical decision as that way they could not be taken in the rear and such a disposition would make it difficult for their flanks to be turned.

Then the men of Munster sounded trumpets and battle cries, and proceeded to Mag Ailbe [Co Carlow]. They were waiting for their enemies with their backs to a dense wood. The men of Munster formed themselves into three equally large, equally extensive battalions: Flaithbertach son of Inmainén and Cellach son of Cerball, king of Osraige, leading the first battalion; Cormac son of Cuilennán, the king of Munster, leading the middle Munster battalion; Cormac son of Mothla, king of the Déissi, and the king of Ciarraige, and kings of many other tribes of West Munster in the third battalion.
Fragmentary Annals of Ireland

In the event the battle quickly became a rout. When the battle was joined, many important Munstermen began to desert. Cormac himself attempted to flee but fell from his horse and broke his neck. King Cellach mac Cerbaill of the Osraige [Kilkenny] too was amongst the slain along with a large number of prominent nobles.

In the aftermath of the battle his Cormac's head was offered to King Flann as a trophy but the King of Tara refused to dishonour his noble opponent. He took the head and kissed it and had it brought in all solemnity to be reunited with its torso. Cormac’s mortal remains were then given to Bishop Móenach who had the body interred at the Monastery of Dísert Diarmata [Castle Dermot, Co Kildare]. Móenach had tried to mediate between the warring sides prior to the battle but without success.

This was one of the most important battles in Ireland for a long time as Cormac’s death severely weakened the grip of the Eoghanachta - the extended royal family that had ruled Munster for centuries. Their power had been slipping and now the weakness of their line was out in the open. Within a few more decades their power was no more and Munster had new rulers with bigger agendas.

A battle was fought between the men of Mumu, the Leth Cuinn, and the Laigin in Mag Ailbi on the feast of Dagán of Inber Dáile, i.e. on Tuesday the Ides 13th of September, the thirteenth of the moon, and Cormac son of Cuilennán, king of Caisel, was killed there together with other distinguished kings. These are: Fogartach son of Suibne, king of Ciarraige, Cellach son of Cerball, king of Osraige, Ailill son of Eógan, superior of the Trian of Corcach, and Colmán, superior of Cenn Eitig. Flann son of Mael Sechnaill, king of Temair, Cerball son of Muirecán, king of Laigin, and Cathal son of Conchobor, king of Connacht, were victors.
Annals of Ulster
 
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