Hot Irish Battles

timm sher

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#37
Islamic conquest of India. Bloodiest in the history of World

"When one thinks of mass murder, Hitler comes to mind. However, the alarming truth is that Islam has, and may surpass all of them combined in numbers and cruelty. Islamic conquest of India was one of the Bloodiest in the history of World. The enormity of the slaughters of the "religion of peace" are so far beyond comprehension that even honest historians overlook the scale. When one looks beyond our myopic focus, Islam is the greatest killing machine in the history of mankind, bar none.

"We do know that over five centuries, vast numbers of Christian boys were kidnapped to become Islamic Janissary mercenaries for the Turks. Add those in, too. Muslims prized blonde women for their harems. In Muslim Spain, an annual tribute of 100 Visigoth [blonde] women was required from Spain's Cantabrian coast. For decades, 100 virgins per year were required by the Muslim rulers of Spain from the conquered population.

"Mohamed legalized paedophilia, polygamy, slavery, and murder, in the Quran he talks about it as if it was perfectly normal, according to Muslims he is the perfect human being. He raped a 9-year-old girl...."



Everyone of Indian heritage know full well of the atrocities committed by the Muslims for over 400 years. The hatred for Muslims is deep rooted in Hindus. They brought a booming artistic spiritual culture that was in its golden age, to the shithole that it is now. The invasion of the British wasn't much better. But the Muslims were the worst. They attempted to systematically tried to destroy all traces of Hinduism and install Islam as the major religion. The more people they killed the more people rose in rebellion. Ultimately they failed. This part of Islamic history will be denied behemetly by the Muslims. but the truth is the truth. Europe is now firmly on their sight. Never trust a Muslim. They practise al-taqqiya a good Muslim is a dead Muslim.
 
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Myles O'Reilly

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#38
I don't think there is any other battle in Irish Republican history over the past 100 years which compares with that particular battle.
I think the Battle of Ashbourne on the same day was important in that the tactics were subsequently employed in the Anglo-Irish war.

Thomas Ashe and his second in command Richard Mulcahy found themselves, almost by accident, in a five hour gunfight with between 50 and 80 RIC officers and men.

Ashe and 36 Volunteers came upon Ashbourne barracks and called upon the garrison to surrender in the name of the Irish Republic. The reply they got was a flurry of rifle fire which made them dive for cover. After half an hour of fighting, with grenades being brought to bear on the barracks and the Police having suffered casualties, a white flag appeared from the window. As Ashe waited for the Police to emerge, firing was heard in the direction of the Rath crossroads. An RIC convoy under the command of DI Harry Smyth and County Inspector Alexander "Baby" Gray that was coming from Slane and on its way to Dublin, had driven right into the Volunteer's positions with both forces surprised to see one another. Fighting broke out immediately, with the 50 - 70 Police and drivers diving from their vehicles into the ditches or wherever they could find cover. Because Ashe had split his men into three sections it gave the illusion that he had far greater numbers than he had. The Police thought they were surrounded by 200 men when in fact at this point they outnumbered the Volunteers by almost two to one.

Mulcahy was sent back to camp to get the 4th section which eventually brought the Volunteer's numbers up to 50 and heavy fighting continued for a number of hours with casualties, particularly on the RIC side, mounting. In the meantime, one section of Police totalling 11 men had surrendered. With their position becoming desperate, District Inspector Harry Smyth stood up on the roadside bank in an effort to rally his men but was shot dead by a Volunteer called Lawless. Smyth was an ex-army Englishman and DI of first class so his death immediately demoralised the remainder of his men. At this point the Volunteers fixed bayonets and charged at the 50 or so remaining RIC, who having just witnessed the death of their commander, immediately abandoned their arms and unconditionally surrendered.

The fighting at Ashbourne had been brutal. Between 14 and 16 men were killed and up to 30 wounded. 10-12 RIC & drivers died along with 2 Volunteers and 2 civilians caught in the crossfire. Up to 70 Police were taken prisoner but were later released under oath not to fight against the Republic again. This was the only significant engagement outside of Dublin city during the Easter Rising.

Thomas Ashe went on to die on hunger strike in prison. Richard Mulcahy became the the first Defence Minister of the Free State, gaining notoriety for ordering the execution of 77 Republicans during the Civil war. Alexander "Baby" Gray, the Tyrone man who himself had gained notoriety some years prior for attacking and dispersing tenant protests in Kerry, was killed in the engagement.


Memorial in Ashbourne

 
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Dan Óg

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#39


This is a fantastic telling of The Battle of The Boyne
 
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Myles O'Reilly

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Dan I saw that Docu before and it is indeed a very good account of the Boyne.

The Battle of Glenmaquin occurred on 16 June 1642 during the 11 years war. Following the uprising the previous year, much of Ireland was in rebel hands and Sir Phelim O'Neill had his eye on Londonderry in order to shore up Ulster for the Confederacy. The recently planted Scotch & English had other ideas however and under Sir Robert Stewart they organised themselves into a force known as the Laggan Army.

In his anxiousness to secure Derry, O'Neill sought battle in County Donegal and found Stewart drawn up on a hillside outside the small village of Glenmaquin. Although outnumbered, Stewart was much more experienced than O'Neill having served in many wars on the Continent and had his army well disciplined and organised. As the two armies stood facing one another, Stewart initiated a feint by sending forward some infantry and cavalry to entice the rebels to attack. The Irish took the bait and charged ferociously toward their foe but the Lagganers about-turned and retreated back to the top of the hill and behind their breastworks. A murderous fire was then poured into the exposed rebel's ranks and they fell in vast numbers. By this time the rebel's second line of attack had charged forward and crashed straight into the retreating remnants of the first wave. With mass confusion in the Irish ranks, Stewart ordered a full on charge and with that the rebels were put to rout. Between 200 and 500 were slain with the Laggan Army suffering only minor casualties.

The result of this battle was to secure the Planter's position in the Finn valley of Donegal and northwest Ulster for the time being and the retreat southward of the Confederate Army.


Battle of Glenmaquin re-enactment


 
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Dan Óg

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#41
Well that certainly was a disaster for the Irish. It is nice that the people up there still remember the day and make an effort at a re-enactment. Here they are majorly into reenactments of course. The local one to me is Lexington which started the Revolution. About 50 Americans and 125 redcoats were killed in the course of the entire day, but just 8 Americans were killed on Lexington Green at 5.30am. Hundreds dress in attire and muskets and is reat fun for anyone that wants toget out of bed early.

That father and son team cover a lot of different english battles, maybe the best I have seen
 
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Myles O'Reilly

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#42
It is nice that the people up there still remember the day and make an effort at a re-enactment.
Generally speaking Dan I would be against such re-enactments. I find that digging up ancient animosities in a triumphalist fashion is disrespectful and can sometimes be antagonistic. Your example is fine because there's no American-British loyalists today that would get annoyed at Revolutionary re-enactments. A better analogy perhaps would be the staging of a celebration of a US Army victory over the native Americans in the middle of a Reservation. Hardly an appropriate event I'm sure you'd agree Sir.

The Battle of Garvagh was fought on 13th December 1641 between native Irish rebels and settlers who were commanded by Edward Rowley and William Canning. As we saw in my last entry Pheilm O'Neill was routed out of Ulster at Glenmaquin but earlier in the war the forces under his command has some considerable success.

His force at Garvagh under Cormac O'Hagan met resistance in the form of 300 men just outside the village at Rowellan's hill. According to settler accounts, the Irish numbered 1,000 strong although this is probably an exaggeration. Its likely the two forces were similar in size and smashed into one another head on. After a time the rebels prevailed and the Anglo-Scotch column broke and fled. Almost their entire number were killed in the battle and subsequent pursuit. A story is still told of how Canning, while trying to escape, scattered a bag of coins on the road in the hope that the pursuing soldiers would stop and pick up the money and he could get away. It didn't work and he was killed beside a church and beheaded.

The battle lived long in folk memory and a poem called "Friends and Foes" was written by Samuel Perry in 1850.

Excerpt:


The Canning on the neighbouring height, thus cheered his soldiers to the fight,
"See yonder hordes who crowd the hill, who come our Saxon blood to spill,
Half armed but not half civilised, tis meet that they should be chastised,
Who the Blackwater piled with slain, not manful pierced on battle plain"



And warlike song and ringing laugh are heard, as flowing cups they quaff;
The guards are set, secure they lie, the mirth goes round, no foe is nigh.
 

Dan Óg

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#43
The Indians likely would not enjoy the reenactment. However there are civil war reenactments as well.

I must check this uprising out.

 
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Myles O'Reilly

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#44
Good point re the Civil war Sir. I'd forgotten about that one.

That Docu you've linked up is very good. There's an historian in it called Lenihan who looks and sounds remarkably like the late Brian Lenihan. I wonder if they're related.
 

Dan Óg

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#45
It is very enjoyable , I watched the first section last night and look forward to the rest.
 
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Myles O'Reilly

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#46
The Battle of Ballinalee was fought during the Anglo-Irish war in 1920 between the Old IRA and the British Army. It was the only town in Ireland where the British were repelled outright. The commander, Sean Mac Eoin, became a close friend of Michael Collins and went on to serve in various Cabinet posts in the Free State/ROI.

Battle of Ballinalee - Wikipedia





A re-enactment:



Commemoration 2013

 

Dan Óg

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#47
I enjoyed that, and will watch the others later.

Does anyone know if it is difficult to get a license to own these rifles, they would be 303's which I intend to buy for myself as a christmas gift.

Is it a different license for the farmers 22 which I think is relatively easy to get.
 
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