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Hot Irish Battles

TW Tone

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May 5, 2019
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Correct.
West Virginia, though not in the Appalachians, is hilly country.
Different to most of the South, which is flat.
It was part of Virginia till it seceded at the beginning of the War in order to stay with the Union.

There was a famous Catholic Priest
Abram Ryan...(I think).....
Called the 'Poet of the Confederacy"

Wow, mikeo, for a Yankee you are well versed in The Lost Cause.
Ryan was a CSA chaplain, don't know if he was born or first generation Irish.
 

Dublin 4

Moderator
PI Member
Nov 21, 2015
34,906
24,125
The IRISH under CONTRACT with the ARCH



Masonic Orange Order Triumphal Arch Ireland by Prince Arthur, on Flickr



William III (1650 – 1702)



The IRISH under CONTRACT with the ARCH by Prince Arthur, on Flickr



King William III of England, Ireland and Scotland

Sovereign Prince of Orange from Birth.

King Billy (Ireland and Scotland)

William of Orange (Netherlands)



Roman City of Orange - France by Prince Arthur, on Flickr



The ancient Roman City of Orange (near Avignon, France), together with the principality, was devolved by marriage to the Princes of the House of Nassau of which William, Prince of Orange was descended.



(Ref: Thomas Nugent - The Grand Tour – 1749)



https://pubastrology.files.wordpress.com/2021/03/noahs-ark-of-the-covenant-revision-1.pdf

https://pubastrology.files.wordpres...d-order-of-the-knights-of-the-garter-v2_6.pdf


King Billy and the Irish Orange Order p2 by Prince Arthur, on Flickr
Mistranslated to Orange after the Name of a Celtic Water God 🤣
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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Feb 3, 2017
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I think there was some kind of connection between Davis....and Pope Pius IX....interesting connection

Sir, that Louisiana Tigers unit I mentioned had a Captain called Robert Atkins who was a COI man from Mallow. He returned to Ireland half way through the war and wrote to the Catholic Bishop of Kerry urging him to try and stop young men going to America and filling the Union ranks.

He mentions the correspondence between Jeff Davis and the Pope in his letter to the Bishop.


 

mikeo

PI Member
May 24, 2017
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Sir, that Louisiana Tigers unit I mentioned had a Captain called Robert Atkins who was a COI man from Mallow. He returned to Ireland half way through the war and wrote to the Catholic Bishop of Kerry urging him to try and stop young men going to America and filling the Union ranks.

He mentions the correspondence between Jeff Davis and the Pope in his letter to the Bishop.




Heck of a find..!
Had no idea......
👍

Too bad....the Irish always fighting someone else's battles...🙁

General Meagher wanted to bring back troops to free his own Country...but unfortunately never materialized...🙁
 

TW Tone

PI Member
May 5, 2019
9,419
15,430
Sir, that Louisiana Tigers unit I mentioned had a Captain called Robert Atkins who was a COI man from Mallow. He returned to Ireland half way through the war and wrote to the Catholic Bishop of Kerry urging him to try and stop young men going to America and filling the Union ranks.

He mentions the correspondence between Jeff Davis and the Pope in his letter to the Bishop.



Good link.
How about a plaque on Atkins' house?
That would get the antifa crowd frothing!

That guy Shiels who runs that site has been doing a great job on the Irish in the American Civil War for years.
I'd love to hear him interviewed on RTE, but never will.
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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This Clare man was born in 1858. In the 1880's he was present at the Bodyke evictions during the Land war.






The most famous of these evictions were at "O'Halloran's fort" where the family, particularly three sisters, resisted the eviction by all manner of defensive means. The O'Hallorans held out for hours against an armed invading force which according to the Freeman’s Journal (11 June 1887) numbered 400 men.





The O'Halloran sisters – Honoria, Annie and Sarah – and their mother, Harriet, June 1887.


 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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Feb 3, 2017
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Those girls were probably what, late teens in that picture (folk looked older then)? Aul Mick above would've been 29 and considered an aul lad by those girls!

.
 

mikeo

PI Member
May 24, 2017
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This Clare man was born in 1858. In the 1880's he was present at the Bodyke evictions during the Land war.






The most famous of these evictions were at "O'Halloran's fort" where the family, particularly three sisters, resisted the eviction by all manner of defensive means. The O'Hallorans held out for hours against an armed invading force which according to the Freeman’s Journal (11 June 1887) numbered 400 men.





The O'Halloran sisters – Honoria, Annie and Sarah – and their mother, Harriet, June 1887.



What a lovely old man....astounding clarity...107?...sounds like he could be 85..

I missed the last part about what people were eating...

Part of history but I really don't like to listen to these stories...eviction..etc.
Makes me, and everyone else I'm sure, angry.
Did the farmers shoot any of these bastards?...were they ALL ...English landlords?
Why all of a sudden did they feel the insatiable desire to evict Women and children??
Do you think many of these bastards are burning now...😂😉..?...

Anyway....incredible video...
 
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Myles O'Reilly

Myles O'Reilly

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I'm surprised you could understand anything he was saying Mike! The last bit he seemed to say "anything made on flour". Bread mainly I'm guessing.

Yes Sir, there was violence during the Land war but largely it was peaceful agitation led by "The Uncrowned King of Ireland" Parnell that led to the Land Reform Acts. They were throwing them out because people, under Parnell & Davitt, refused to pay unfair rent.

Interestingly, those Westminster Land Acts made the Irish land situation far more equitable than in Britain. They meant that tenants could eventually buy their own land whereas I believe in England to this day farmers still don't technically own their land.

No burning dude, I don't think so :) . They were just different times. Some Landlords were well liked. A number of 'em were financially ruined trying to help their tenants during the famine. In Skerries there's a large monument in the middle of the town, always tended to with fresh flowers, to the Landlord of the area at that time.
 

mikeo

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May 24, 2017
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I'm surprised you could understand anything he was saying Mike! The last bit he seemed to say "anything made on flour". Bread mainly I'm guessing.

Yes Sir, there was violence during the Land war but largely it was peaceful agitation led by "The Uncrowned King of Ireland" Parnell that led to the Land Reform Acts. They were throwing them out because people, under Parnell & Davitt, refused to pay unfair rent.

Interestingly, those Westminster Land Acts made the Irish land situation far more equitable than in Britain. They meant that tenants could eventually buy their own land whereas I believe in England to this day farmers still don't technically own their land.

No burning dude, I don't think so :) . They were just different times. Some Landlords were well liked. A number of 'em were financially ruined trying to help their tenants during the famine. In Skerries there's a large monument in the middle of the town, always tended to with fresh flowers, to the Landlord of the area at that time.

..never heard about those 'just' landlords, during the famine....beautiful story..restored some faith in humanity..👍

What incredible changes in daily life, that man had seen.