• Before posting anything about the COVID-19 virus, please read this first Click Here

I wish I was in the land of bog cotton

  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #28
OP
Zosimus

Zosimus

PI Member
Joined
May 25, 2020
Messages
551
Likes
1,031
An unfortunate development in American culture is that the memory of the Confederacy became associated with country music, good ol' boys, Bourbon, fried squirrel, gun racks and countless other pieces of nonsense.
Ironic, because the Confederacy saw itself as a place of high culture.
It saw itself as such but how justified was such a belief? Did the antebellum south produce even a single writer, painter or composer of note? I personally like the squirrel-eating hick Neo-Confederates more than I like the slaveowners-pretending-they're-feudal-knights-because-they've-read-a-Walter-Scott-novel Confederates. The culture of the latter is far more worthy of the word nonsense in my opinion: there is nothing worse than a hybrid of savagery and pretension.
 

TW Tone

PI Member
Joined
May 5, 2019
Messages
5,526
Likes
9,251
Location
Wherever Green is Worn
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #30
OP
Zosimus

Zosimus

PI Member
Joined
May 25, 2020
Messages
551
Likes
1,031
Yankee bigotry and condescension on shameful display:

 

TW Tone

PI Member
Joined
May 5, 2019
Messages
5,526
Likes
9,251
Location
Wherever Green is Worn
They had no short-term plans of annexing northern terrirtory, that is true, but they were very keen on expanding south and west. Think of the Missouri border ruffians in Bleeding Kansas before the war. Given that they had very clear designs to oversize the Union with the amount of southern and western territory they annexed, it seems very likely that they ultimately intended for their new order to eventually swallow the old one completely.

If you are telling us the Confederacy hoped to establish slave labour cotton plantations in Minnesota and New Hampshire, you're out of your mind.
You're still making the error I corrected.

To repeat: the Confederacy had no designs on most Northern states. They did, unsurprisingly have hopes for border states in the Union such as Maryland and Kentucky, places where sympathy for the CSA was high.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #33
OP
Zosimus

Zosimus

PI Member
Joined
May 25, 2020
Messages
551
Likes
1,031
If you are telling us the Confederacy hoped to establish slave labour cotton plantations in Minnesota and New Hampshire, you're out of your mind.
You're still making the error I corrected.

To repeat: the Confederacy had no designs on most Northern states. They did, unsurprisingly have hopes for border states in the Union such as Maryland and Kentucky, places where sympathy for the CSA was high.
As I explained before in previous posts, there is reason to think the CSA would have introduced plantation agriculture to anywhere the climate allowed for it, and there is also reason to believe from the writings of the Confederacy's 'founding fathers' that they saw their endeavour not as an 'alternative path' for a section of the nation but rather as as new civilisation, or the completion of American civilisation, which would eventually supersede and absorb the obsolete Union. I'm talking in terms of the 'thousand year Reich' perspective rather than the 'should we invade Russia?' perspective. My point is that the Confederacy was imperialist rather than localist-nationalist in ideology, something which is already abundantly clear from the Knights of the Golden Circle and the filibusters. In other words, I think Jefferson Davis and Alexander H. Stephens imagined that North and Central America in a hundred years' time would consist only of the CSA, and that slavery would be legal in every state. I admit I was imprecise in the wording in my original post, but I have clarified in subsequent posts. I think you are wilfully being difficult at this stage.
 
Top Bottom