How our perceptions of reality evolved for fitness, not truth -- we see what our ancestors needed to see

colm from clonmel

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As an atheist, I couldn't give a fupp one way or the other.
Well you should. You're obviously a bright lad so ignoring one of the most important institutions in human history will leave you lacking in a full understanding of the world we live in.

The Bishop is an important chess piece.

The Vatican flag has two keys on it. One too represent the key to this world, the other represents the key to the next life.

The bible is a philosophical book.

Christianity destroyed the evil that was the Roman Empire. Christianity offered the slaves of the Roman Empire a promise, a promise of life after death. The Romans killed the Christians, they fed them to the lions.

Constantine converted to Chrstianity.

Your atheism doesn't impress me.

I see it as a sign of weakness.
 

Heraclitus

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Well you should. You're obviously a bright lad so ignoring one of the most important institutions in human history will leave you lacking in a full understanding of the world we live in.

The Bishop is an important chess piece.

The Vatican flag has two keys on it. One too represent the key to this world, the other represents the key to the next life.

The bible is a philosophical book.

Christianity destroyed the evil that was the Roman Empire. Christianity offered the slaves of the Roman Empire a promise, a promise of life after death. The Romans killed the Christians, they fed them to the lions.

Constantine converted to Chrstianity.

Your atheism doesn't impress me.

I see it as a sign of weakness.
I'm more a pantheist/monist than a materialist atheist.
Atheism is simply the lack of a belief in a deity or deities, so the label applies.

As for Catholicism, it's an organisation with roots in Roman statecraft and Abrahamic folk mythology.
On the subject of its morality, I'm strongly in agreement with Nietzsche: it made a virtue out of resentment by the weak towards the strong.
Hence its mass appeal.

It came very close to completely wiping out Europes pre-Christian heritage, starting with the decrees of Theodosius I.

However, for better or worse, it's been a part of Western culture for a very long time; I acknowledge this.
But all said and done, it's just another Abrahamic death cult.
 

colm from clonmel

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I'm more a pantheist/monist than a materialist atheist.
Atheism is simply the lack of a belief in a deity or deities, so the label applies.

As for Catholicism, it's an organisation with roots in Roman statecraft and Abrahamic folk mythology.
On the subject of its morality, I'm strongly in agreement with Nietzsche: it made a virtue out of resentment by the weak towards the strong.
Hence its mass appeal.

It came very close to completely wiping out Europes pre-Christian heritage, starting with the decrees of Theodosius I.

However, for better or worse, it's been a part of Western culture for a very long time; I acknowledge this.
But all said and done, it's just another Abrahamic death cult.
A fair analysis and not without merit. I don't have the time or inclination to enter a debate.

I am not an ego-maniac so have no desire to prove you wrong so to speak.

i will however offer up this link as conjecture for further analysis.

Sinister Sites - Israel Supreme Court
 

Heraclitus

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A fair analysis and not without merit. I don't have the time or inclination to enter a debate.

I am not an ego-maniac so have no desire to prove you wrong so to speak.

i will however offer up this link as conjecture for further analysis.

Sinister Sites - Israel Supreme Court
Suits me fine.
I don't want the thread to become derailed from its main subject matter.

These atheist v theist debates have a tendency to go on and on, with posters talking past each other and no one convincing anyone of anything.
Over on P.ie, the same cohort of atheists and religious have been 'debating' each other for over a decade.

It's the same 2 or 3 topics debated over and over again -- ad finitum -- just with differently worded thread titles.
 
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A very interesting talk by Donald Hoffman, a cognitive scientist.
In it, he outlines his theory that our perceptions of reality are analogous to a graphical interface and only as attuned to our environment as evolutionary fitness demands.

In essence, he views our perception of reality as a species specific interface.
Additionally, there are some mind blowing implications of this paradigm that he further elaborates on.

I wish I could've written a more expansive OP, but I'm only just diving into this.
I'll have to read into the subject much further.

Anyhow, enjoy

I only looked at the first video, just my thoughts on it, but i may have missing something completely on what he was saying.

1) Our ability to see more shades of green then any other colour is part of this visual changes.
So we can pick out the animal among all the foliage etc...

But perception is different from men to women, men tend to focus on a spot, eg hunitng for a particular animal, whereas women see the bigger picture as in foraging
Women will say its a nice day, men will say thats a nice car.

Women tend to see more shades of red
BBC NEWS | Health | Why women see many shades of red
It is thought that the red gene routinely swaps bits of genetic material with its neighbour on the X chromosome, which controls perception of the colour green.
"Females may have historically been better at gathering fruits and other food items because of their better colour discrimination in the red range of colour.
Men and Women Really Do See Things Differently
Females are better at discriminating among colors, researchers say, while males excel at tracking fast-moving objects and discerning detail from a distance—evolutionary adaptations possibly linked to our hunter-gatherer past.
It would have been interesting if he has done tests to see did men find it before women in the spot the difference questions.
Otherwise im not sure whats new about what hes saying thats far out there ?


2) Modernity/technology and aspects of relgion/culture where one man stays with one women (removing a lot of the fight to procreate) in general has a big effect on peoples brains surely ?

As example of the mobile phone over the telephone, no longer do we need to remember dozens of 10 digit numbers, at best its a four digit numbers for our debit cards and with all this one touch payments even that will be removed. And so an area of the brain regards memory will no longer be utilised.

Or the black taxi cab driver vs your general taxi driver using gps everywhere.
BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Taxi drivers' brains 'grow' on the job
"One particular region of the hippocampus, the posterior or back, was bigger in the taxi drivers.
"The front of the hippocampus was smaller in the taxi drivers compared to the controls.
The mobile phone and mapping in your hands has degraded at least mens abilities regard those same areas of the brain, women are less developed by default in the spatial awareness area anyway.

Spatial Orientation and the Brain: The Effects of Map Reading and Navigation ~ GIS Lounge
According to the BBC, police in northern Scotland issued an appeal for hikers to learn orienteering skills rather than relying solely on smartphones for navigation. This came after repeated rescues of lost hikers by police in Grampian, one of which included finding fourteen people using mountain rescue teams and a helicopter. The police stated that the growing use of smartphone apps for navigation can lead to trouble because people become too dependent on technology without understanding the tangible world around them.
These people should be dead, except for modernity, eg the helicopter finding them.

Also may be a weight towards an increased levels of diseases like Alzheimers
What researchers found was significant in terms of how spatial orientation affects the brain. After performing fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scans on people using both of those strategies, the individuals that used a spatial navigation strategy had an increased activity in the hippocampus. Conversely, they found that using a GPS excessively might to lead to atrophy in the hippocampus as a person ages, and this could put them at higher risk for cognitive diseases later in life. One of these diseases might be Alzheimer’s which impairs the hippocampus and leads to problems with spatial orientation and memory. Researchers also found a greater volume of grey matter in those who used spatial navigation, and this group scored higher on standardized cognition tests than those who used the other strategy. The results of this study demonstrate that using orienteering and building cognitive maps might be better for the brain than using a GPS.

3) The idea that things dont exist independant of us sounds like a variant of solipsism Solipsism - Wikipedia or dualism or some such,
I would assume the moon exists just people may percieve it differently because peoples brains are wired differently due to nurture and nature.

But i found this quote from him as counter to solipsism
There is a reality independent of my perceptions, and my perceptions must be a useful guide to that reality. This reality consists of dynamical systems of conscious agents, not dynamical systems of unconscious matter.
The above doesnt sound a very useful way of thinking about the world, sounds like he is putting another layer of complexity in.


4) http://cejournal.org/GRD/Holo.pdf
Our perception creates a duality of subject and object, of the subjective and the objective. We think of information as objective, and experience as subjective. In fact, no such dualities exist. Information and experience are one and the same. Every particle in the universe is alive with experience. Every organism is alive with experience. The Universe is alive with experience. On the universal level, experience is one. We are one with this universal experience.

Information does not pass into extinction with the passage of time. Time is a series of universal boundaries beginning with the inception of our universe. We know, according to relativity that, at the speed of light, time stands still. So, for light, and for the Universal Holographic oundary expanded outward at the speed of light, time is standing still. Light is essentially timeless. It is eternal. On the boundary of our universe, there is only now. The universe, is, in fact, continually being recreated, continuously revisiting and repeating its own history. It is always being now. From eternity to eternity, forever and ever, from now-past to now future, it is always being now. This is the eternal now.

Everything and everybody is eternal on the highest dimension of the universal pulse. And yet time flows. It flows in the lower dimensions, tied to the bulk, tied to matter, tied to the continuous stutter of systems, following the arrow of the concatenation of information. The light moves outward. Time seems to move. And yet, it is always being now.
The holographic principle sounds a bit like Rupert Sheldrakes Morphic resonance, where all self organising systems inherits a collective memory that influences their form and behaviour.
That memory is inherent in nature, again i may not have gotten exactly what he was on about.
Im not sure what hes saying regards this otherwise ?


5) Yes we have become smaller in size, especially those from europe and the north of europe, eg vikings would have been larger then their southern european farmers.
Also his view that the brain reduces is suspect and also questionable as to what that would mean even if it were true, as does the parts that reduced make us less able in a modern world.
Again i would think the modern world is dumbing us down right now, I dont see how this is evolution, otherwise the word evolution is rather broad or not a part of the world for a long time regards humans ?
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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You do know that the great Donald Trump never set foot in California on his march to his magnificent victory.
He did a time or two actually, and riots ensued. However, the TV coverage of the open borders/cuck chimpouts enraged so many people that were on the fence, they were driven into the Trump camp.

People are literally fleeing California, it's gone full Libtard.
It has indeed and I work in the thick of it. My voting precinct went overwhelmingly for Trump, but that was an outlier.
 

Heraclitus

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This discussion nicely complements the subject matter of the thread.

 
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