Drought in Ireland Leads to Discovery of Neolithic Henge

Kershaw

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Drought in Ireland Leads to Discovery of Neolithic Henge



Drone footage captured amid a heatwave close to the 5000-year-old Newgrange neolithic passage tomb in County Meath, Ireland, on July 10 revealed an previously-undiscovered henge, sparking an investigation by the country’s National Monument Service

The henge, which could measure up to 200m in diameter, is believed to have been built some 500 years after Newgrange, which dates from 3,000 BC.

The drone that captured the image revealing the henge’s presence belongs to historian and author Anthony Murphy, who has been recording and writing about the Boyne Valley for many years.

He said “the weather is absolutely critical to the discovery of this monument. I have flown a drone over the Boyne Valley regularly and have never seen this.”

Mr Murphy said the bit of moisture left in the soil “lodges in the archaeological features a little bit more than it does in the surrounding soil and the crop that is growing out of the soil is greener in the archaeological features and drier outside of them.”

Scorched earth during heatwave reveals new monument at Newgrange
Massive unknown 'henge' discovered at Newgrange - thanks to drought and drone - Independent.ie
Drought in Ireland Leads to Discovery of Neolithic Henge



 

McTell

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#6
We are giving credit to the neolithics, even tho we replaced them. I used to like thinking that one of my ancestors had helped build newgrange, but "we" arrived later than that and killed off the builders.

But hey, wasn't it handy to rebuild the site for tourism in the 1970s, and pass it off as a part of our gaelic culture?

DNA sheds light on Irish origins
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#7
We are giving credit to the neolithics, even tho we replaced them. I used to like thinking that one of my ancestors had helped build newgrange, but "we" arrived later than that and killed off the builders.

But hey, wasn't it handy to rebuild the site for tourism in the 1970s, and pass it off as a part of our gaelic culture?

DNA sheds light on Irish origins

Not at all. The Celtic invaders would have been small in number compared to the indigenous population. DNA shows that the population in Ireland has been very constant in Ireland right back to the Ice Age - that is until the most recent Invasion and Plantation of Ireland by mass immigration, which is having a much more destructive effect than any invasion before it.
 

Wnoa

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#8
We are giving credit to the neolithics, even tho we replaced them. I used to like thinking that one of my ancestors had helped build newgrange, but "we" arrived later than that and killed off the builders.

But hey, wasn't it handy to rebuild the site for tourism in the 1970s, and pass it off as a part of our gaelic culture?

DNA sheds light on Irish origins
I think it was mostly men that were killed off whereas the women were absorbed by the new arrivals.
We have to be very careful nowadays with these kind of studies, unfortunately even the areas of archaeology anthropology and genetics have been hijacked by ideology and serve an agenda. An example would be cheddar man and the attempt to portray the original inhabitants of these Isles as black or dark skinned (which was subsequently refuted by other scientists who worked on the same team)
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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I think it was mostly men that were killed off whereas the women were absorbed by the new arrivals.
We have to be very careful nowadays with these kind of studies, unfortunately even the areas of archaeology anthropology and genetics have been hijacked by ideology and serve an agenda. An example would be cheddar man and the attempt to portray the original inhabitants of these Isles as black or dark skinned (which was subsequently refuted by other scientists who worked on the same team)

I doubt if many men were killed off either. The neolithic farmers of Ireland were not warriors. They would have had no way to resist the heavily armed and battle hardened Celts. Right across Central and Western Europe, the Celts didn't disrupt the farming activities of these people but did make them their subjects. Over time, the Celtic warriors intermarried with the Neolithic people.
 

jmcc

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#10
These extrapolations seem to be from a very small number of bodies. It seems that when the generally scientifically illiterate media gets hold of one of these stories, they don't accurately report it.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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These extrapolations seem to be from a very small number of bodies. It seems that when the generally scientifically illiterate media gets hold of one of these stories, they don't accurately report it.

We can see from the religions and languages of the Indo-Europeans that they adopted many aspects of the religion and linguistic traits of the populations they conquered. This would hardly happen if they just exterminated those they conquered.
 

jmcc

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We can see from the religions and languages of the Indo-Europeans that they adopted many aspects of the religion and linguistic traits of the populations they conquered. This would hardly happen if they just exterminated those they conquered.
The study of historical DNA shows that History is far more complex than people think and that in some cases, theories about history are quite wrong.
 
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