Do you buy official line on American Civil War?

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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The Govt wanted to do no such thing. The south started the war despite every exasperated effort by people like Lincoln to avoid it.
Really? During the months leading up to Ft. Sumter, Lincoln periodically queried his cabinet as to whether war was feasible and the cabinet generally agreed that it wasn't. Even Winfield Scott, Commander of the Army and architect of the Anaconda Plan, concurred it would be better to part ways with the wayward Southern sisters. However, Chase and Seward were able to convince Lincoln otherwise. What was missing? A false-flag as casus belli.

Lincoln dispatched one of his bosom buddies who was familiar with South Carolina to Charleston to have him put his ear to the ground and pump the locals for information. He proceeded to ask whether Federal attempts to re-supply Fort Sumter would be considered provocative and invite retaliation by the South Carolina militia (which was 16,000 strong. The Union army had 13,000.). To a man, the answer was yes. The newspapers had their false-flag and Lincoln had hisr casus belli.

What explains Lincoln's evolution from "dove" to war-monger and future tyrant? Who in the North stood to gain most from hostilities and eventually total war? The banks, the armaments industry and the railroads. Lincoln cut his teeth as an attorney who sold property rights-of-way to the railroads, earning a mint in the process. One hand washed the other. And then some.

The war was fought to preserve the Union and abolish slavery, you say? The war was fought to neutralize the South's disproportionate political influence and to eliminate her as an economic rival. To paraphrase Lincoln, "We wish to replace the current proprietors of the South with those of our own." During "Reconstruction," the Union had this in spades.

Every southern state barring South Carolina raised patriotic regiments to fight for the Union.
And their numbers were paltry, Myles.

Lincoln usurped the Militia Act to get volunteers from various states and he cowed the Congress to march lockstep with him. The Militia Act was intended for the suppression of insurrection in a state only if the state's legislature expressly requested it. Since seven states had already seceded, the Militia Act could not be legally invoked (the Act would have a Chinaman's chance anyway were they still part of the Union) and the other four vehemently opposed it. He even went as far as jailing legislators in Maryland, fearing they would vote for secession, and he exacerbated fratricide in Missouri and to a lesser degree, Kentucky.

Increasingly, history frowns on Lincoln and his legacy, which unleashed horrific slaughter, privation, disenfranchisement and converted the South into an economic and political backwater for generations to come. It's not for nothing that Mississippi did not celebrate Independence Day for 70 years after the fall of Vicksburg.

I ofttimes weep when I think of the landless men of the Tennessee hills who left their cabins and their families to fight under old glory
But you don't weep for the landless crackers of Dixie who fought for their State first and foremost, and the Confederacy second? What about the landless Paddies in the North who were sent like lambs to the slaughter, while politicians, bankers, industrialists and railroad fat-cats lined their pockets, far out of harm's way?

Some of the commentary on this thread is appalling.
I'd call yours largely uninformed, Myles. Then again, you might want to pay a visit to this now-cucked Civil War museum and commiserate with its shitlib curators:

SMITHSONIAN Magazine Endorsing Anti-Southern Propaganda In Richmond, VA | Articles

If you want to know what our Ruling Class wants us to think, an excellent resource is Smithsonian Magazine. The May 2, 2019 issue features an article titled “A New Civil War Museum Speaks Truths in the Former Capital of the Confederacy.” The first paragraph sneers:
After the war, its [Richmond’s] historians, writers, and sculptors manufactured “heroes” of the Confederacy as men who treated enslaved people with paternalistic affection, fighting for just causes and states’ rights.
The author, one Andrew M. Davenport (right) a Ph.D. student at Georgetown, appears secure in his belief that what the Richmond patriots of 1861-1865 said about their own ideals and intentions was nothing but a self-serving “myth” made up after the fact. Why not? Most likely, his professors all hold the same view. Cultural Marxists have driven conservative historians from the campuses. In the absence of contradictory opinion, hatchlings like Mr. Davenport can’t imagine having to support their assertions or address opposing ideas.

Of course, in the current academic climate, dogmatic denial of dissident views and uncritical support of the reigning orthodoxy increase the probability that Mr. Davenport will not be asking the question most often posed by History Ph.D.’s: “Would you like fries with that?”
The new museum, a merger of the recently-founded American Civil War Center and the long-established Museum of the Confederacy—which, Davenport sniffs, “emerged directly from the Lost Cause propaganda machine”—has the following mission statement:

“The mission of The American Civil War Museum is to be the preeminent center for the exploration of the American Civil War and its legacies from multiple perspectives: Union and Confederate, enslaved and free African Americans, soldiers and civilians.”
I seriously doubt that even-handedness is the real goal. The CEO, a “person of color” named Christy Coleman believes that the war “saved and redefined what the republic would be.”

NBC News reports that

Coleman wants to give visitors the chance to understand the war from all sides and keep the conversation open on others who were impacted, including members of the LGBTQ community and women. She says black people avoided talking about the Civil War for a long time because the narrative of the war was taken away from blacks.
 
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TW Tone

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I don't believe Myles' claim that every CSA state bar SC had pro--union regiments.
Georgia? Florida? Virginia?Alabama? I don't believe it.

We all know that mountain areas of southern states held northern sympathies, to such an extent that WV broke away from VA, but that's not what Myles claims.

Slightly contradicting myself,. I had a friend in graduate school--he was in history-- who wrote his thesis on pro--Union sentiment in Texas, and I remember him giving me details, some quite bloody.
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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thesis on pro--Union sentiment in Texas, and I remember him giving me details, some quite bloody.
German immigrants to Central Texas were enthusiastic proponents of strongly centralized government and abolitionism. Needless to say, they were a thorn in the side of Texans. The Germans also served as useful idiots for the Union in Missouri. If you heard that things were bloody in Texas, read what transpired in Missouri. It was simply tragic. People refer to Jesse James as a terrorist, but read an objective history of Missouri during the war and the horrors his mother, his brother Frank and Jesse endured, and you'll understand why he did what he did.
 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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I don't believe Myles' claim that every CSA state bar SC had pro--union regiments.
Georgia? Florida? Virginia?Alabama? I don't believe it.
There were pockets of resistance to the Confederacy, but they were few and far between. The media and "academics" have a tendency to blow the numbers far out of proportion. For obvious reasons...
 

Ire-land

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I'm not sure American college students have heard about the official line, to be honest.

Worth a watch, even if just for the coffin at the start. Lol with tears

 

Tadhg Ó Raghallaigh

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I'm not sure American college students have heard about the official line, to be honest.
Worth a watch, even if just for the coffin at the start. Lol with tears
Student loan debt is the next doomsday bomb ready to blow, because politicians and the edutainment sectors have done their level best to send every bottom-feeding shit-for-brains in America to university, whether or not they have the intellectual and/or financial wherewithal to hack it.

It's a race to the bottom and this video provides yet more proof of it.
 

Ire-land

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Student loan debt is the next doomsday bomb ready to blow, because politicians and the edutainment sectors have done their level best to send every bottom-feeding shit-for-brains in America to university, whether or not they have the intellectual and/or financial wherewithal to hack it.

It's a race to the bottom and this video provides yet more proof of it.
Good point- I remember even when I went to college over there, which was a good while ago now, and took a general maths class in my first semester, it was stuff we’d done for the inter cert.

One of things I found very strange, from the dumbing down perspective, was that we had to qualify for specific courses/fields of study in college, and not only that, but you basically had to decide which one when you were 15, around your inter cert, so you could tailor your education/potential points.

There were people I knew over there in their sophomore years who were still trying to decide what they were going to get a degree in in. And then there was the debt they had!

The girls were hot, though.
 

Myles O'Reilly

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Helmuth von Moltke, the elder of the two notable Generals von Moltke and who made his fame in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871, is noted for allegedly describing the American Civil War as nothing but “two armed-mobs” running around the countryside and beating each other up, from which very little of military utility could be learned.
'Twas the first major war to introduce breech loading rifles, trenches and showed the futility of cavalry charges in modern times from what I can remember.

Its interesting that the Irish part in the war is well documented but there were probably as many Germans fighting in it yet their story is little known. Probably because of the Irish propensity for recording stuff in poem and song.
 
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