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Direct Provision scammers in Kerry go on hunger strike over demands to be moved to new accommodation

Vote 4 Change

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I see what you are getting at, they want to transplant their "homeland to another country" and have the best of both worlds wherever they live.The want Lagos on the Liffey, Karachi on the LEE, Soweto on the Shannon, .........All the comforts and standards of the developed modern world with the religious , social, nonworking lifestyle of the 3rd world here.
And all the while, always angry, always unhappy, always demanding more,more,more from their host country.
 

Rasherhash

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Just a thought. These foreigners who are unhappy with their own country come to our country and are still moaning and bitching. Maybe there’s a trend here?
When the Cubans were looking to get rid of thousands of their malcontents they sent them to the land of the free.
The yanks thought this was great anti-commie publicity and made a big show of taking in these poor freedom loving Cubans.
Only to discover in the succeeding years they had taken in half the Cuban Mafia.
 

Peter Schlemihl

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And all the while, always angry, always unhappy, always demanding more,more,more from their host country.

If you think about it, it sort of makes sense that a lot of them are complaining. Bulelani Mfaco was an MA student in Ireland so he’s obviously not poor, at worst he’s middle-class South African. His standard of living was probably pretty decent both in South Africa and in Ireland. And this is true to some degree or another for most of our African and European asylum claimants.

So stuff that, to a Syrian whose house was bombed to bits or to a Yemeni who could hardly scrape together a meal a day, would seem unbelievably trivial, to Mfaco seems like injustice and inhumanity.

Having to share a room, not always liking what is on the dinner menu, not always having connection to WiFi, being asked to sign out of the accommodation when leaving for the day. I mean these are things that anyone who has paid to stay in a hostel will have gone through.

These are issues which I don’t think would even register as issues with genuine asylum claimants. But that’s the thing, isn’t it? Only about 25-30% appear to be genuine asylum claimants. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the fact that the 70% that aren’t genuine stay in the system for year after year, and all of the nuisances that annoyed them at year one become inhumane torture by year 5.
 

BSA

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If you think about it, it sort of makes sense that a lot of them are complaining. Bulelani Mfaco was an MA student in Ireland so he’s obviously not poor, at worst he’s middle-class South African. His standard of living was probably pretty decent both in South Africa and in Ireland. And this is true to some degree or another for most of our African and European asylum claimants.

So stuff that, to a Syrian whose house was bombed to bits or to a Yemeni who could hardly scrape together a meal a day, would seem unbelievably trivial, to Mfaco seems like injustice and inhumanity.

Having to share a room, not always liking what is on the dinner menu, not always having connection to WiFi, being asked to sign out of the accommodation when leaving for the day. I mean these are things that anyone who has paid to stay in a hostel will have gone through.

These are issues which I don’t think would even register as issues with genuine asylum claimants. But that’s the thing, isn’t it? Only about 25-30% appear to be genuine asylum claimants. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the fact that the 70% that aren’t genuine stay in the system for year after year, and all of the nuisances that annoyed them at year one become inhumane torture by year 5.
I've said it before.. There are not enough genuine asylum seekers in Ireland to fill a seven seat taxi...

What we have are thousands of mouthy economic migrants.. who are pathological liars and whose 'asylum' fairy stories would only be believed by a fool or the Irish government.. Any person who invites him/herself to our country and pulls this shit will almost certainly contribute nothing , ever, to Ireland and will be yet another charge on the poorly paid highly taxed Irish PAYE worker
 

Peter Schlemihl

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I've said it before.. There are not enough genuine asylum seekers in Ireland to fill a seven seat taxi...

What we have are thousands of mouthy economic migrants.. who are pathological liars and whose 'asylum' fairy stories would only be believed by a fool or the Irish government.. Any person who invites him/herself to our country and pulls this shit will almost certainly contribute nothing , ever, to Ireland and will be yet another charge on the poorly paid highly taxed Irish PAYE worker

Which is why, in my opinion, opposition to immigration ought to focus on asylum. If one considers the immigrants that tend to experience socio-economic issues and that tend to be culturally complicated to contend with - Nigerians, Congolese, South Africans, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis - one realises that they are all invariably a product of asylum.

Of course, others are open for criticism as well, Filipino immigrants represent 30% of illegal immigrants in Ireland, Brazilian immigrants are often guilty of overstaying visas, Polish immigrants are guilty of welfare fraud etc. But in terms of immigrants that actually tend to be a problem, that are overrepresented in terms of welfare and social housing, that are overrepresented in crime report after crime report for rape or FGM or fraud, it is invariably the asylum nationalities.

If these were generally genuine asylum claimants such as Syrians or Afghanis then there would be a convincing argument for accepting this, for focusing on assimilation and understanding that issues are inevitable, but these applications are far from genuine. The rejection rate for the majority of these nationals is over 90%.

Despite MASI and the apparent interest in ending direct provision, I am convinced that this - asylum fraud and deportation - is a fairly simple issue to mobilise support for.
 

TW Tone

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The Sunday. Times devotes half a page to a Jihadi family gone AWOL in Syria.
The father is a Moroccan who was naturalised as an Irish citizen (Laxest process in Europe, never tire of saying it). The bastard, in a show of the sham loyalty he had pledged to Ireland, ran off clutching his passport, hoping to kill people in the Middle East.
It gets complicated, but as far as I can see the wife is a Japanese jihadi also a naturalized Irish citizen.

These people play passport ping-pong, abetted by our own morons in the Dept of Justice.

I have no proof, but I would bet the Moroccan originally showed up in Ireland as an asylum seeker.
What other talent would he have.

In any case, let's hope he is regularly being interviewed by the Syrian secret police or military intelligence.
 
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