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Dandelions

Storybud2

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The Humble Bee early food supply ,, that is all it is, people are listening to stories about when the Queen Bee comes out of her burrow early
and needs food , the dandelion is a main source of food early in the year, it is quite a good thing ,, without the bee's and pollinators the planet
is totally fooked,

Former grass verges etc will be let go wild in the future and that is a great thing, encouraging pollinators is far more important that some
neat looking verges that nobody ever uses,,
 

Polyco

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Dandelions leaves were once a staple of salads although they are also a great diuretic so you wouldn't want to overdose on them. In fact it has been suggested that farmers should actually encourage them in swards as the cows would pee more often ensuring a more even distribution of urine over the field.

But yes, this year is definitely one for dandelions but years go like that, each one tends to favour one species or another. Cow parsley is quiet this season but I can remember the hedgerows being totally white with them in the past and the same goes for the toxic ragwort which can turn whole acres yellow in a bad summer. Last year thistles were prominent but they don't appear to have taken off as much so far this spring.
 

Conall Gulban

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I think it's just the year that's In it with the the unseasonably good weather in April. Lots of hoverflies about along with the bees. It will be a good year for insects if the weather keeps up although we could do with a drop of rain. Some of my plants in the garden are destroyed with aphids much earlier than usual.
 

gerhard dengler

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This is a superb thread, packed with interesting info.

The pollination Info in particular. A couple of years ago we decided to leave part of our garden untended. I have to say I wasn't particularly keen on doing this, but I'm glad to say that I was wring because it's great to observe the birds and bees and natural flora and fawna take over, rather than mowing manicured grass lawn.
 

Polyco

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This is a superb thread, packed with interesting info.

The pollination Info in particular. A couple of years ago we decided to leave part of our garden untended. I have to say I wasn't particularly keen on doing this, but I'm glad to say that I was wring because it's great to observe the birds and bees and natural flora and fawna take over, rather than mowing manicured grass lawn.
I'm in two minds over this, yes it's good to let nature take a little of her own back but I hate the thought of not accessing all the ground, hence my various expeditions out into the wilds and behind the sheds with the strimmer. The front verge however, was always a pain to keep cut so I'm letting that grow, just trimming alongside the road itself. Brambles are always a problem with this ideal so I'll be watching for those and the dreaded ragwort.
 

gerhard dengler

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I'm in two minds over this, yes it's good to let nature take a little of her own back but I hate the thought of not accessing all the ground, hence my various expeditions out into the wilds and behind the sheds with the strimmer. The front verge however, was always a pain to keep cut so I'm letting that grow, just trimming alongside the road itself. Brambles are always a problem with this ideal so I'll be watching for those and the dreaded ragwort.
I was like you, wary about not being able to access part of the garden and wary too about the aesthetic appearance of stuff just growing there. But I have to say I was wrong to be wary, because the presence of bees alone has made that section of the garden worth while.

In fact I planted in that part of thegarden some wild gorse that I got from the Dublin mountains. Around March/April each year it blooms with yellow flowers and the bees literally love this stuff. Presumably this bloom contains pollen (I don't know if it does but the bees appear to love it)
 
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