Commission of Investigation "Crock of $hit" re Mother and Baby Homes says activist Solicitor

Fire2theRain

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Evidence of cruelty by nuns... A legitimate newspaper (Sunday Independent) interviewed Tuam Home Survivor Anne Kelly Silke:


"I remember eating the moss off the walls" she says. "We were hungry. Not just me. We were all hungry."

Anne Kelly Silke


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In the Sunday Independent #sindo don't miss this stunning piece of journalism by Maeve Sheehan #tuambabies

*EVIDENCE*


'Cruel twist of fate kept two Tuam babies thousands of miles apart'

Sunday Independent


By Maeve Sheehan


A legitimate newspaper - Sunday Independent - interviewed a Tuam survivor Anne Kelly Silke (b: February 1951) who recalled nuns tearing lumps of large batch (bread) to throw at the children who would fight over it:



Anne Kelly Silke’s earliest memories are of the babies in cots lined up outside the home in the “scorching” sunshine; the ubiquitous Bina Rabbitte - the woman whose name appears on almost every birth and death certificate for the Tuam home - preparing bottles; and of the nuns tearing lumps off large batch loaves to throw at the children, who would fight over it, like pigeons; and of hunger.

I remember eating the moss off the walls,” she says. “We were hungry. Not just me. We were all hungry."


When she [Anne Kelly Silke] was nine, she and two other girls were called into the nuns’ parlour to be paraded before a potential foster family. She was given “a nice dress” to wear and was “all dressed up”. “They picked me,” she says, and without a word of explanation they took her with them when they left.

The farming family was “well-got”, she says. “They had seven bedrooms in the house.” Anne slept in her own room with a broken window and potatoes spread all over the bedroom floor to sprout.

Foster family's allowance for Anne Kelly Zilke:


She was foster-child-cum-servant. The family who took her in would have received a monthly fee of £2 and 10 shillings until she was age 10, £3 a month up to the age of 16, plus an annual allowance of £9 to £11. She milked 14 cows in the morning and 14 in the evening and was responsible for feeding the sows, ducks, hens and turkeys. Sometimes she was taken out of school to clean the house.


Foster Family's SAVAGE son beat 11 year old Anne regularly. He stripped her waist down and skinned Anne's backside with a whip. Another time, he smashed her face against the wall and she lost her two front teeth:


"Her foster father was kind to her, and she says she was treated well enough to begin with. She says one particular son, then a young man, caused her most hardship. He beat her regularly - savage assaults that she “will never forget”.

“The worst beating I ever got was the horse’s whip. His mother went to him over something I’d done. I think it was over a tin of fruit that I took, or over the apples that I took. I did open the tins of fruit and I’d eat them,” she says. She thinks she was 11 or 12 at the time. Her foster mother went for Anne, and when she retaliated, her son stepped in.

He [son] stripped me half-naked, waist down, and put me across the chair - and the wallop. The blood was pouring down my legs. I couldn’t sit,” she says.

"She kept running away “because of the beatings”. But she said the son “went around the whole village telling everyone they were not to take me in”. “The horse’s whip. I don’t know what I [age] was, I would say around 11 or 12. I couldn’t sit. The blood was pouring down. My backside was skinned, that was the truth."

"On another occasion, she says he [son] caught her by the hair and smashed her face against the wall. She lost her two front teeth.

"She says the family also took in a teenage boy from Letterfrack. “He had a bedroom beside me but we were not to talk to each other. He was helping out on the farm. He didn’t last too long,” she says. The son found he had not finished a task. “He put the spade right through [into] his foot. I can see it to this day. He went off roaring and I never saw him from that day to this.”

 

Fire2theRain

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Interestingly, Breeda Murphy Secretary to Tuam Home Survivors Network said on Galway Bay FM Keith Finnegan Show the Commission had asked for a *delay* for the final report. Finnegan corrected Breeda and called this an "extension."


HOWEVER, BREEDA MURPHY (THSN) SPEAKS CORRECTLY WHEN SHE CALLS IT A DELAY.


*The next interim report in March 2019 should include all the known facts to date across the full scope of the Commission's investigation.*


^^^ That way this interim report will inform legislators who are being manipulated into consideration of new legislation that will shield culpable parties.





'The workload keeps on growing at Mother and Baby Homes Commission'

Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 12:00 AM


The workload keeps on growing at Mother and Baby Homes Commission | Irish Examiner


By Conall Ó Fátharta


"Despite survivors and a range of TDs requesting that the Government refuse the commission’s request, it was never likely to happen. If the Government did this, it would effectively be asking the commission to stop its work and publish an incomplete report. That would benefit no one.

"Furthermore, we would be left with a highly peculiar scenario where a State inquiry, largely established because of the discovery of the Tuam babies, would be publishing its final report without knowing the details of what happened at that site or any other site for that matter.




_______

Keith Finnegan Show (Galway Bay FM) 23 January 2019 ~ Breeda Murphy after listening to guest Catherine Corless speak rang in to the programme ~
#1036
Castlepollard Exclusion From Commission on Mother and Baby Homes INQUIRY. (Second Thread) - Page 104

 

Fire2theRain

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*SCOTTISH *PUBLIC HEARINGS* HELD IN TWO SIGNIFICANT CASE STUDIES AND A THIRD ONE IS NOW NEAR COMPLETION


*IN CONTRAST THE IRISH COMMISSION OF INVESTIGATION'S PROCESS IS SECRET AND IT HAS REFUSED REQUESTS FROM INDIVIDUALS, AS PER SECTION 11 OF THE ACT, TO HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS


READ SECTION 11 OF ACT ON PUBLIC HEARINGS ~
Commissions of Investigation Act 2004

Commissions of Investigation Act 2004, Section 11



Extracts below from Newsletter Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry ~ WINTER / SPRING 2019


Link supplied by Lumpy Talbot ~
https://www.childabuseinquiry.scot/m...newsletter.pdf


Foreword by Lady Smith

I am pleased to report that the Inquiry is progressing well. We have completed the PUBLIC HEARINGS in two significant case studies and a third one is now near completion.

My findings in relation to the first case study (institutions run by the Daughters of Charity) have been published. My findings in relation to the second case study (institutions run by the Sisters of Nazareth) are in hand and I will be publishing them as soon as I can. We also continue to gather and carefully study evidence from a variety of sources to assist us in our investigations which are, out of necessity, wide-ranging.



CASE STUDY FINDINGS

Daughters of Charity

On 11 October, the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry published the Chair’s interim findings into residential institutions run by the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul (DoC). *She has concluded that children did suffer abuse.*

During the case study, the Inquiry considered evidence about the nature and extent of any relevant abuse at institutions run by the DoC in Scotland, with a particular focus on Smyllum and Bellevue.

The 20-day case study took place from November 2017 to January 2018, during which time the Inquiry heard evidence from 54 witnesses about their experiences of Smyllum Park in Lanark and Bellevue House in Rutherglen. A FURTHER 21 WRITTEN STATEMENTS OF EVIDENCE WERE READ IN DURING THE PUBLIC HEARINGS.

Print and broadcast media both covered extensively the publishing of the findings.




#892
Transcript by Starry ~
Castlepollard Exclusion From Commission on Mother and Baby Homes INQUIRY. (Second Thread) - Page 90


'Justice Deferred is Justice Denied'
The Echo Chamber Podcast
Tortoise Shack Media

Echo Chamber Podcast on Twitter:
Echo Chamber Podcast (@EchoChambersPod) | Twitter


Echo Chamber Podcast‏ @EchoChambersPod


Dr Maeve O'Rourke, newly appointed lecturer in Human Rights NUIG ~~~


"Really need a change in the procedures of all investigations into State malpractice.

"Having private Investigations/Inquiries [COMMISSION OF INVESTIGATION INTO MOTHER AND BABY HOMES, MCALEESE INQUIRY] where victims AND next of kin can't even see evidence being examined, can't comment on it, can't give judge or investigator questions to ask. It appears to be entirely contrary to your right to an effective investigation under European Convention of Human Rights.

"By design not to deal with historic scandal after historic scandal.

"NOT ALL HEARINGS HAVE TO BE IN PUBLIC. EVERYTHING SHOULD NOT BE IN PRIVATE {E.G., COMMISSION OF INVESTIGATION INTO MOTHER AND BABY HOMES).

"People can't get into court. So government do their own kind of Inquiry OUTSIDE OF COURT, which it actually uses to gather up and bury all evidence.


Clann's Press Release...


CLANN PUBLISHES FINDINGS OF THREE-YEAR PROJECT ON ADOPTION AND MOTHER AND BABY HOMES Clann: Ireland’s Unmarried Mothers and their Children: Gathering the Data


CLANN PUBLISHES FINDINGS OF THREE-YEAR PROJECT ON ADOPTION AND MOTHER AND BABY HOMES

October 15, 2018

"Rod Baker, of Hogan Lovells, said: ‘There is a surprising reticence by authorities to allow individuals access to basic information about themselves, preferring to preserve the confidentiality of the institutions and their members whose actions caused those individuals great suffering. Even the Commission set up to investigate those institutions is operating in great secrecy and has refused, without giving any justification for the refusal, to allow public hearings when requested by witnesses in accordance with the Commissions of Investigation Act 2004. In this modern age, it is imperative that this pervasive insistence on secrecy is abandoned and those who have suffered most get the information they need’.


"Dr Maeve O’Rourke, Co-Director of the Clann Project, said: ‘The insistence on secrecy is causing ongoing human rights violations. There is a “right to truth” under European and international law for victims and survivors, and for the general public, where gross human rights violations have occurred in a country. It is time for the State to do what is right and tell the truth. It is the first step in restoring dignity to people who have suffered, and in ensuring that these abuses never happen again.’


"Dr Maeve O’Rourke continued: ‘Under international law, an “enforced disappearance” occurs where a person is detained or abducted with State involvement, following which the State refuses to provide information about the person’s fate or whereabouts. We have many cases of “enforced disappearance” in Ireland,” she concluded.



ICCL: Commission of Investigation into cervical check may further violate rights - Irish Council for Civil Liberties
Dublin, 2 May 2018

In a statement, Liam Herrick, director of the ICCL, said:


“We have been calling for a review of the 2004 Commissions of Investigation Act for some time now because it simply does not provide for an effective investigation or remedy. The Act presumes that investigations will be conducted in private, and it is criminal offence carrying up to 5 years’ imprisonment for any person to publish evidence given in private. This means that people who are affected by the issues under investigation are not given the right to know or comment on the evidence being considered, and the archive of a Commission of Investigation is sealed from the public once the inquiry finishes.

"Commissions of Investigation are not allowed to give their evidence to An Garda Síochána for the purposes of a criminal investigation, and they are expressly exempt from the ordinary obligation under the Data Protection Acts to provide individuals with records that are held on them. This system is totally inappropriate for investigating the serious questions that arise in relation to the Cervical Check scandal.”

 

Fire2theRain

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Evidence of Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary Nuns evil :Mad 2: *CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY* :Mad 2: in Bessborough Mother and Baby Home, Co Cork, which was exposed by Ireland's Chief Medical Officer Dr James Deeny in mid-1940s...
EVIDENCE OF IRISH NUNS CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY IN BESSBOROUGH MOTHER AND BABY HOME, CO CORK:Mad 2: THIS IS SOMETHING THE NAZIS WOULD DO… :Mad 2: AND THIS IS THE REASON FOR THE COVER-UP AND INTERMINABLE DELAYS...
^^^ THIS SHOULD GO TO THE HAGUE ^^^
WATCHING Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald being thoroughly grilled by the chair of the UN Committee on Human Rights Nigel Rodley last month, one thing was clear — as a State, we are either unwilling or unable to face up to our past.​
Year after year, scandal after scandal, from the Magdalene laundries, to symphysiotomy, and now to mother and baby homes all are linked by a common thread — the shameful treatment of women and the lengths to which the State will go to delay or deny justice.​
Successive governments and ministers had been told about the horror of mother-and-baby homes. They chose to do nothing.​
While they wrung their collective hands after the exposure of the Tuam scandal earlier this year, archive material shows that the de facto health minister more than 60 years earlier was concerned enough about the number of infants dying in Bessborough to order that women no longer be sent there.​
In February 1944, it was “unanimously agreed” by the Cork Board of Public Assistance that the authorities in Bessborough be requested “not to place out at nurse any child unless they are satisfied by a Certificate of Medical Officer as to its bodily health and mental condition and suitability for placing at nurse”.​
The following month, it wrote to the matron of Bessborough, Sr Martina, and its medical officer, JT O’Connor, to furnish it with two reports it had compiled arising “out of an inquiry received from an Inspector of the Local Government Department relative to the high rate of infant mortality at the Sacred Heart Maternity Home, and complaints made by foster parents of alleged debilitated children being placed at nurse from the Home”.​
However, the government of the day decided to go a step further. Fianna Fáil’s Con Ward, effectively the health minister of the day, issued a circular directed that “for the time being”, no unmarried mother or expectant unmarried mother should be sent to The Sacred Heart Home and Hospital, Bessboro, Blackrock”.​
Instead, patients were to be sent to the Cork County Home.​
This was in 1943, but unfortunately, the concerns about Bessborough did not end there. In his 1989 memoir To Cure and to Care, former State chief medical officer James Deeny wrote that he also shut down Bessborough. Although he didn’t specify in what year, it appears his inquiries took place at some point between 1945 and 1948. Infant deaths were still a problem. Dr Deeny’s findings are worth reading in full.​
:Mad 2: IN ONE YEAR FEWER THAN 8O BABIES LIVED OUT OF 180 IN BESSBOROUGH WROTE DR JAMES DEENY, CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER FOR IRELAND (REFER ALSO TO HIS QUOTES IN JOURNAL.IE AND IRISH CENTRAL REFERENCES BELOW)
:Mad 2: EVIDENCE OF *CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY* IN BESSBOROUGH MOTHER AND BABY HOME ~~~
“For example, going through the returns for infant deaths in Cork, I noticed that there was something unusual and traced the matter to a home for unmarried mothers at Bessborough outside the city,” wrote Dr Deeny. “I found that in the previous year some 180 babies had been born there and that considerably more than 100 had died.​
“Shortly afterwards, when in Cork, I went to Bessboro. It was a beautiful institution, built on a lovely old house just before the war and seemed to be well run and spotlessly clean. I marched up and down and around and about and could not make out what was wrong; at last I took a notion and stripped all the babies and, unusually for a Chief Medical Adviser, examined them.​
“Every baby had some purulent infection of the skin and all had green diarrhoea, carefully covered up. There was obviously a staphylococcus infection about. Without any legal authority I closed the place down and sacked the matron, a nun, and also got rid of the medical officer. The deaths had been going on for years. They had done nothing about it, had accepted the situation and were quite complacent about it.”​
:Mad 2: EVIDENCE MOTHERS DENIED BASIC MEDICAL CARE IN BESSBOROUGH MOTHER AND BABY HOME ~~~
June Goulding was a midwife in Bessborough in 1951. Her harrowing account of her time there outlines how women were not allowed pain relief during labour or stitches after birth, and when some of them developed abscesses from breast-feeding, they were denied penicillin.​
One nun who ran the labour ward in 1951 also forbid any “moaning or screaming” during childbirth. Girls in poverty, who could not afford to make donations to the Sacred Heart order, had to spend another three years after their babies were born cleaning and working on the lands around the Cork city home to ‘make amends’ for their pregnancy.​
Such work often included cutting the home’s “immaculate lawns” on their hands and knees — with a pair of scissors.​
THE GOVERNMENT ARE RETICENT TO INCLUDE ALL COUNTY HOMES IN COMMISSION OF INVESTIGATION
:Mad 2: EYE WITNESS DR JAMES DEENY, CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER, WRITES ABOUT THE EXPLOITED IRISH WOMEN SLAVES IN COUNTY HOMES ~~~
“When I started to visit County Homes shortly after I was appointed I found women, some of them old, who 30 or 40 years before had been unmarried mothers, were disowned by their families and had fetched up for shelter in the workhouse,” wrote Dr Deeny. “They had been assigned to work in the kitchen or laundry as ‘able-bodied female paupers’. They had spent years or even a lifetime working without pay, dressed up in the workhouse garb, literally slaves.”​
STARRY:
Hasn't the Commission been given all of the above evidence? It goes beyond criminal negligence. :Mad 2:These are abominable Crimes against Humanity...:Mad 2:​
^^^ THIS SHOULD BE REFERRED TO THE HAGUE ^^^
Things improved in the 1950s due to the fact that the babies were worth much more alive to the nuns (e.g., secret legal adoptions in 1953). Dr James Deeny (mid 1940s Report) and midwife June Goulding's book "The Light in the Window" (record of her year as a midwife at Bessborough) are first hand documented accounts from eye-witnesses to the evil crimes against humanity perpetrated in Bessborough Mother and Baby Home.​
I have a source on Castlepollard thread that I must find - Archbishop McQuaid ordered a media ban on reporting of the lucrative banished babies trade, which included mother and baby homes. This blanket ban lasted until journalist Alison O'Reilly broke the Daily Mail story about the Tuam children on 25 May 2014, which went viral (international media reported children in the septic tank). At that time there were calls for Bessborough to be excavated as well. Commission was started in February 2015.​
________​
I provide some more sources:
Mortality rates for three Sacred Heart mother and baby homes during (1944):
Bessborough Sacred Heart mother & baby home, Co Cork – 44.6 per cent,​
Sean Ross AbbeySacred Heart mother & baby home, Co. Tipperary – 33.7 per cent​
Castlepollard Sacred Heart mother and baby home, Co. Westmeath – 9.1 per cent​
Research carried out in Sean Ross Abbey by Maria Luddy, a Warwick University History professor, shows that the mortality rate for 120 babies born in 1930 was up to 50 per cent. Further figures provided by ARN at Sean Ross Abbey show the mortality rate for the 174 babies born in 1945 was 27.6 per cent.​
Figures provided for Bessborough show the home had a mortality rate of 55 per cent in one of the years of 1945 to 1948, according to records detailed by Dr James Deeny, Ireland’s Chief Medical Officer at the time. Deeny also noted that during one particular year, when 180 babies were born, more than 100 of those may have died.​
'Top doctor [Chief Medical OfficerJames Deeny] and midwife [June Goulding] reported dreadful conditions' [in Bessborough Mother and Baby Home]
Jun 09, 2014​
James O'Shea @IrishCentral​
Dr. James Deeny, the health board’s Chief Medical Officer, visited Bessborough to investigate the horrific death rate in the home, where 100 out of 180 babies born there had died.​
He wrote, “Shortly afterwards, when in Cork, I went to Bessborough. It was a beautiful institution, built on to a lovely old house just before the war, and seemed to be well-run and spotlessly clean. I marched up and down and around about and could not make out what was wrong; at last I took a notion and stripped all the babies and, unusually for a Chief Medical Adviser, examined them.​
“Every baby had some purulent infection of the skin and all had green diarrhoea, carefully covered up.​
“There was obviously a staphylococcus infection about.​
“Without any legal authority I closed the place down and sacked the matron, a nun, and also got rid of the medical officer.​
“The deaths had been going on for years. They had done nothing.”​
Dr. Deeny had the place closed and completely disinfected. He wrote: “During the succeeding years, while many hundreds of babies were born each year, the number of deaths never exceeded single figures.”​
Between August 1951 and June 1952, after Doctor Deeny’s intervention, fewer than 2% of infants died at the home.​
In her 1998 book, ‘The Light in the Window,’ June Goulding describes the home in Blackrock, Cork City, as “a secret penitential jail.” She recounts how mothers were not allowed pain relief during labor.​
She says that at her first Bessborough birth, she asked someone at the hospital what painkiller were used in labor.​
“Nobody gets any here, nurse, They just have to suffer,” she was told.​
The nun who ran the labor ward in 1951 forbad any “moaning and screaming” during childbirth. None of the mothers was allowed to talk to one another or to the nurses at the home. They were also expected to wet-nurse other women’s babies, reports the Irish Examiner.​
When she asked why she could not access needles to stitch women who had been torn during childbirth, she was told: “I’m afraid, nurse, the key to that cabinet has never been handed over. Girls must suffer their pain and put up with the pain of being torn – she [the nun] says they should atone for their sin.”​
The girls who could not make donations to the Sacred Heart order would have to spend three years after their babies were born cleaning and working on the lands around the home to “make amends” for their pregnancy and their children were usually taken from them and given up for adoption or sent to orphanages.​
Tue, Apr 6, 1999, 01:00
It is an account of her experiences in an Ireland which, in 1951, allowed the religious orders almost total freedom from accountability. An Ireland in which pregnant unmarried women could be "imprisoned" for as long as three years, could be forced to work behind the plough or in steaming laundries, could be set to trimming lawns with their fingers or hauling rollers over newly-tarred macadam on the convent driveway.​
They were dressed in smocks and refused any underwear except open-gussetted knickers; their days began at 6 a.m. and were spent running the convent, home and hospital; the community was paid £1 a week for each inmate, two shillings and sixpence for each infant, although the institution was completely self-sufficient and the women provided it with unpaid and uncomplaining labour.​
To read this book is to discover how labour camps could be established in the midst of an urban community. All the features are here: degrading uniforms, inadequate diet, humiliating restrictions on personal hygiene, forced hard labour, prohibited communications and the inevitable and almost certainly terminal separation from one's child.​
As June Goulding tells it, things were even worse for those in the hospital where no assistance apart from that of the midwife was allowed - no pain-relief, no episiotomies, no sutures, no healing baths, a doctor who only came to take Wassermann tests or, once, to provide anaesthesia.​
Permission to use analgesics was refused; tears were left unsutured, deliveries which should have been aided by forceps were allowed do what damage they might.​
In January 1945, Cllr Fagan claimed at a meeting of Westmeath County Council that “inmates” at the institution were being compelled “to do manual work and take the place of men”. He said the girls “had to cut timber and wield heavy sledges in all kinds of weather and clad in overalls”. Describing the conditions as “uncivilised”, he said it was like the days of slavery, and he said he had witnesses to prove his claims.​
The council agreed to inspect Manor House, and the committee appointed to go there reported that it was run “in an exemplary manner”. Cllr Fagan complained, however, that the sisters had forewarning of the council’s visit, and he claimed that contrary to the written report prepared after the meeting, the delegation had not spoken to any of the girls staying there.​
The home [Castlepollard] was one of three run by the Sisters of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, whose other homes were at Bessborough in Co Cork, and Sean Ross Abbey in Roscrea.​
They arrived in Castlepollard in 1934, after purchasing Manor House, the estate of the Pollard-Urquhart family, founders of the town of Castlepollard, and with a grant from the Irish Sweepstake, built St Peter’s, which, after the nuns’ departure became a Midland Health Board hospital for people with disabilities.​
The home could accommodate around 120 girls at a time. When they arrived, girls were given an assumed name to use, and they were expected to work to effectively “repay” the cost of their stay, which in some cases, lasted years, even though the state gave a per capita allowance to the sisters for the care of the young women.​
Several accounts have been given of the harshness of the regime, and as far back as the 1940s, concerns were raised with Meath County Council by Cllr Sean Doyle of Athboy, and with Westmeath County Council by Cllr James Fagan, that St Peter’s was far from being the strict but fair institution where girls were given a “fresh start” after their “first offence” (girls who became pregnant outside of marriage on more than one occasion were sent to different institutions).​
In January 1945, Cllr Fagan claimed at a meeting of Westmeath County Council that “inmates” at the institution were being compelled “to do manual work and take the place of men”. He said the girls “had to cut timber and wield heavy sledges in all kinds of weather and clad in overalls”. Describing the conditions as “uncivilised”, he said it was like the days of slavery, and he said he had witnesses to prove his claims.​
The council agreed to inspect Manor House, and the committee appointed to go there reported that it was run “in an exemplary manner”. Cllr Fagan complained, however, that the sisters had forewarning of the council’s visit, and he claimed that contrary to the written report prepared after the meeting, the delegation had not spoken to any of the girls staying there.​
Historian Ruth Illingworth confirmed this week that the regime at Castlepollard was harsh, and that to a large extent, this would have been known. “It would have had a bad image at the time – a seriously bad image.​
“I was told that people saw girls who were nearly nine months pregnant out in the fields digging potates, and man in his 70s told me that as a boy, he climbed over a wall there, and he saw a nun hitting a girl with something like a belt,” she says.​
However, things improved somewhat in the 1950s and 1960s.​
“I think that there was an unannounced visit by an inspector, and after that, things did improve.” [Starry: I endorse the view it was due to what has been called the lucrative trade in banished babies; as the babies were now more valuable to the nuns alive than dead]​
 

Catalpa

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Evidence of cruelty by nuns... A legitimate newspaper (Sunday Independent) interviewed Tuam Home Survivor Anne Kelly Silke:
"I remember eating the moss off the walls" she says. "We were hungry. Not just me. We were all hungry."​
Anne Kelly Silke
CormacBourke Verified account​
@Cormacbourke​
Follow Follow @Cormacbourke​
*EVIDENCE*
'Cruel twist of fate kept two Tuam babies thousands of miles apart'
Sunday Independent
By Maeve Sheehan
A legitimate newspaper - Sunday Independent - interviewed a Tuam survivor Anne Kelly Silke (b: February 1951) who recalled nuns tearing lumps of large batch (bread) to throw at the children who would fight over it:
Foster family's allowance for Anne Kelly Zilke:
Foster Family's SAVAGE son beat 11 year old Anne regularly. He stripped her waist down and skinned Anne's backside with a whip. Another time, he smashed her face against the wall and she lost her two front teeth:
"Her foster father was kind to her, and she says she was treated well enough to begin with. She says one particular son, then a young man, caused her most hardship. He beat her regularly - savage assaults that she “will never forget”.
“The worst beating I ever got was the horse’s whip. His mother went to him over something I’d done. I think it was over a tin of fruit that I took, or over the apples that I took. I did open the tins of fruit and I’d eat them,” she says. She thinks she was 11 or 12 at the time. Her foster mother went for Anne, and when she retaliated, her son stepped in.​
He [son] stripped me half-naked, waist down, and put me across the chair - and the wallop. The blood was pouring down my legs. I couldn’t sit,” she says.​
"She kept running away “because of the beatings”. But she said the son “went around the whole village telling everyone they were not to take me in”. “The horse’s whip. I don’t know what I [age] was, I would say around 11 or 12. I couldn’t sit. The blood was pouring down. My backside was skinned, that was the truth."
"On another occasion, she says he [son] caught her by the hair and smashed her face against the wall. She lost her two front teeth.
"She says the family also took in a teenage boy from Letterfrack. “He had a bedroom beside me but we were not to talk to each other. He was helping out on the farm. He didn’t last too long,” she says. The son found he had not finished a task. “He put the spade right through [into] his foot. I can see it to this day. He went off roaring and I never saw him from that day to this.”​
Those are accusations - not Evidence

Yet You continually mix them up!
 

Fire2theRain

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Evidence of Crimes Against Humanity continued… Below is the resource I was searching for...



'Mother and Baby homes in Ireland A standard Reference guide and Timeline of Mother and Baby homes, adoption, and the treatment of single mothers and their children in Ireland from 1739 to 2015'


Mother and Baby homes in Ireland

By Paul Redmond


Extract only

Mother and Baby homes in Ireland A standard Reference guide and Timeline of Mother and Baby homes, adoption, and the treatment of single mothers and their children in Ireland from 1739 to 2015 | Paul Red - Academia.edu

First Edition


1950 represents a tipping point in the history of M&B homes. Mortality rates began falling in the late 1940s and continued to fall throughout the 1950s. Babies were worth more alive than dead after the Banished Babies trade started and this factor added to the introduction of full, secret, legal adoption from the 1st of January 1953 also helped make adoption desirable and fashionable among all classes of society. Doctor Deeny’s intervention in Bessboro and Goulding’s time as a midwife there (see 1951) also served to both scare and shame the Sacred Hearts into taking more care with the lives of the babies. However mothers continued to be treated badly and the regimes remained strict until the early to mid 1970s.

The next 20 years to 1970 represent a Golden Age for the orders of nuns and their M&B homes as the Adoption Act, lucrative Banished Babies trade, over 900 acres of farmland and several other factors combine to make the nuns a fortune and extend their reach into every corner of Ireland and much of the UK to forcibly repatriate ’escapees’. Due to the adverse publicity that initially surrounded the banished babies trade, Archbishop McQuaid ordered a media ban on reporting anything related to the practise including M&B homes. The entire industry effectively disappeared from public view and didn’t re-emerge until the Tuam 800 story broke in May 2014 and the follow up articles that uncovered all the 9 M&B homes. The vanishing act was helped by the fact that while Magdalene Laundries always existed in towns and cities, M&B homes tended to be in the countryside or on the edges of suburbia and away from public notice
.

It is notable that the nuns and Church prospered during the 1950s as that decade is often referred to in Ireland as the ’Hungry ’50s’ and approximately 500,000 people emigrated. The nuns and M&B homes prospered while Ireland starved. There seems to have been no research into ascertaining if there is a correlation between the increased wealth of the Church and the increasing poverty among the Irish people during this decade. It was not just the newly legalised and polished Adoption Machine that prospered but all the Institutions. Most of them were well know for their increasingly decrepit states during their lifetimes while the Government continued to pour vast sums of money into them. As multiple survivor testimonies have shown, the money did not go towards food, clothing, education, maintaining the buildings, medical care, training, etc.

Thank you Paul Redmond (Chair, Coalition of Mother and Baby Homes Survivors) for your valuable research.



Further, there are the vaccine trials where the children were used as lab rats at the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary Mother and Baby Homes, as well as other institutions.​



"Vaccine trials in children's homes without consent would not be allowed under Nurembourg Code, , a set of guidelines agreed following the trial of Nazi doctors after WWII. Yet these guidelines were blatantly ignored in the rush for medical advances in the post-war period."

Source: ('Anatomy of Scandal' - Prime Time)



Tuesday, November 15, 2016


Bessborough Mother and baby vaccine trial files altered | Irish Examiner


By Conall Ó Fátharta


"The files of vaccine trial victims in Bessborough Mother and Baby Home were altered in 2002 — just weeks after the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse sought discovery of records from the order running the home.

"Material obtained by the Irish Examiner under Freedom of Information shows that changes were made to the records of mothers and children used in the 1960/61 4-in-1 vaccine trials.




"The document listing the changes opens with: “8.8.02 Checked the 20 files.” This is immediately followed by: “9.8.02 Made the changes.” The changes made to files Nos 5, 8, 11, 12, and 15 to 20 are then detailed.


The changes include:

The alteration of discharge dates of mothers (by a period of one year and two years);
The changing of discharge dates of children;
The changing of admission dates of mothers;
The alteration of the age of a mother (by two years);
The alteration of dates of adoption;
The changing of baptism dates and location of baptism;
The insertion of certain named locations and information into admission books.

A data protection request released to Bessborough vaccine trial victim Mari Steed in 2011 also confirms this timeline. ….


#115
*SISTER MARY MENGELE NUNS sending away hundreds of infants for anatomical dissection, without parental consent, ***until Mid-1960s*** ... and vaccine trials*

Castlepollard Exclusion From Commission on Mother and Baby Homes INQUIRY. (Second Thread) - Page 12
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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Eating moss off walls? Jesus, the Jews in Auschwitz should have come up with that one :rolleyes:
 

Catalpa

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Starry

re It is notable that the nuns and Church prospered during the 1950s as that decade is often referred to in Ireland as the ’Hungry ’50s’ and approximately 500,000 people emigrated. The nuns and M&B homes prospered while Ireland starved.

The standard of living began to improve in the late 1950s

This State had a straight run of economic improvement every year from 1958 to 1974

Unprecedented & never matched since.

If adoptions went up in the 1950s then that surely would mean that couples now had the means to do so.

You continually quote To Cure & to Care by Dr James Deeny

- though I doubt you have ever read it.

You do know that Dr Deeny was a devout Catholic who if he were alive today I'm sure would be issuing with a 'Cease & Desist' Order to stop you using his work to denigrate the Catholic Church.

For the Record this is what he actually said about Bessborough:


For example, going through the returns for infant deaths in Cork, I noticed that there was something unusual and traced the matter to a home for unmarried mothers at Bessborough outside the city, I found that in the previous year some 180 babies had been born there and that considerably more than 100 had died.
Shortly afterwards, when in Cork, I went to Bessborough. It was a beautiful institution, built on a lovely old house just before the war and seemed to be well run and spotlessly clean. I marched up and down and around and about and could not make out what was wrong; at last I took a notion and stripped all the babies and, unusually for a Chief Medical Adviser, examined them.
Every baby had some purulent infection of the skin and all had green diarrhoea, carefully covered up. There was obviously a staphylococcus infection about. Without any legal authority I closed the place down and sacked the matron, a nun, and also got rid of the medical officer. The deaths had been going on for years. They had done nothing about it, had accepted the situation and were quite complacent about it.
A couple of days later I had a visit in Dublin from the nuns ‘man of affairs’ and he was followed by the Dean of Cork, Monsignor Sexton and finally the Bishop of Cork complained to the Nuncio, who went to see De Valera. The Nuncio Archbishop Robinson (formally a millionaire stockbroker) saw my report and said we were quite right in our action. For once the Bishop, Dr Lucey, a formidable fighting man, was silent.

Later, when the place had been disinfected and repainted and so on, the order supplied a new matron and we appointed a new doctor. during the succeeding years while many hundreds of babies were born each year , the number of deaths never exceeded single figures. today the deaths of only a few infants in such an institution will bring about a furore in the press.

page 85

As you can see the representative from the Holy See [Archbishop Robinson] fully backed him

- so much for the 'Evil Church'!
 

Fire2theRain

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'Survivors of mother and baby homes employing top law firm to sue State for hundreds of millions'


'Dublin based Coleman Legal Partners are currently progressing a number of sample claims in the High Court and proceedings have been issued in these matters'




27 January 2019

Survivors of mother and baby homes employing top law firm to sue State for hundreds of millions - Irish Mirror Online


Survivors of mother and baby homes fed up with the Government’s delaying tactics are set to sue the State and religious orders for hundreds of millions of euros.

'The Irish Sunday Mirror has learned a top law firm has put together a team of six barristers to begin a series of High Court battles. '


Spokesperson for Irish First Mothers Fintan Dunne speaking about Commission of Investigation's delay tactics ~


“It is a mechanism for evading redress. They’ve had two extensions to the working report which was supposed to take 18 months and took three years.

“We’ve had four interim reports now and nothing coming out of it.” [Report in March 2019 is due on burial arrangements at major institutions]

"He added the commission’s workload and resources meant it was unlikely to see a final report before 2021.


STARRY: FINTAN DUNNE QUESTIONED WHY NO FINDINGS OF CULPABILITY HAD BEEN MADE WITH MORE THAN 500 WITNESSES ALREADY INTERVIEWED?


"The Irish Sunday Mirror understands the company [law firm Coleman Legal Partners, Dublin] is willing to lodge mass individual actions on behalf of survivors without seeking any payment up front."


Spokesperson for Irish First Mothers Fintan Dunne speaking about these civil suits being as close to a class action in Ireland as you will get (a class action is not allowed under Irish law) ~



Claims will include negligence, psychological abuse, false imprisonment, assault, breaches of human rights law and genealogical bewilderment – in other words not knowing who the hell you are or where you came from.”


In 2018 Irish First Mothers accused the Commission of Investigation, headed by Justice Yvonne Murphy, of misleading survivors who wanted to give sworn testimony ~



Rosemarie Adie, whose daughter was taken from her minutes after she gave birth aged 18, said she was one of many denied a chance to speak to the judge.

[YET THE COMMISSION STATED IN A LETTER TO ROSEMARIE ADIE THAT SURVIVORS HAVEN'T COME FORWARD WITH ENOUGH INFORMATION]



Sandra Schroeder-Pierce, whose son was given up for adoption when she was 17 at the Good Shepherd home in Meath said ~


As Ireland’s largest group of women who were in institutions for unwed mothers, we have lost confidence in Minister Zappone, in Judge Murphy and in the current justice process

Labour’s Brendan Howlin said:


“Will the Government agree to provide redress for those affected, many of whom are elderly and deserve our compassion and a resolution to ease their pain as far as we can provide for this?

“If we do not act now, for some it will be too late.

“It is already too late for those survivors who have passed away in the four years since the inquiry began.
 

Fire2theRain

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#1121



Podcast of Galway Talks with Keith Finnegan – Friday February 8th 2019

Scroll to 10:37


"On today’s show Keith spoke to Catherine Corless about the launch of Tuam mother and baby home oral history project..."



Catherine Corless (Ms Corless had her nervous cough again when she was speaking about this event to Keith Finnegan) ~~~


Ms Corless said Catrione Crowe moderator of Panel Discussion at NUIG talked about Commission of Inquiry and government for not bringing out interim report sooner. Catrione spoke about the secrecy of the Commission and how they won't involve survivors even though this is all about them in the first place.



STARRY:


Non survivor Catherine Corless and Minister for Children Katherine Zappone were both on Galway Bay FM Keith Finnegan Show on 24 October 2018, and this DOUBLE ACT spent their time on the show BACKSLAPPING EACH OTHER. It was NAUSEATING to listen to both of them. How much worse for survivors. How quickly things have changed Ms Corless.




^^^I DISAGREED WITH MS CATHERINE CORLESS' RESOUNDING ENDORSEMENT OF MINISTER ZAPPONE ON 24 OCTOBER 2018^^^



HERE'S TUAM HOME SURVIVORS NETWORK STATEMENT ~~~ THSN DON'T MINCE THEIR WORDS:





Statement on behalf of the Tuam Home Survivors Network 03/02/2019



To ensure there is no ambiguity on the position of the Tuam Home Survivors Network in relation to recent announcements by Katherine Zappone and the Government, kindly note the following:


The aims and policy of the Tuam Home Survivors Network are



The exhumation of all human remains at the Tuam site.


The creation of a DNA database of all survivors, family members of survivors, family members of those registered as dying in the Tuam home and family members of any persons known to be missing from the Tuam home so as to identify as many as possible of the human remains.


That all aspects of the forensic exhumation of the Tuam mass grave be undertaken by the only legal authority both permitted and obliged to do so, the Coroners Service under the auspices of the Department of Justice.


It is beyond debate that the Minister continues to act ultra vires in this matter. That is our clear position.


The fact that Coroner for North Galway has failed in his duty to convene an Inquest or that successive Attorneys General have failed in their duty to appoint another Coroner, or the fact that the Department of Justice has failed to fulfil its role, does not mean that their powers devolve on the Minister for Children by default.


It is difficult to see what if any role the Minister for Children has in this matter. Any suggestion that she has the power to control the process of bringing closure to the Tuam story is constitutionally and legally absurd and we do not in any way support it.



____




If Zappone gets NEW legislation through Orieachtas for her cronies to handle the exhumation instead of a coroner, then THEY ARE FREE TO DO IT WRONG. THAT'S WHAT THEY WANT, A BUILT IN EXCUSE FOR DOING IT WRONG. HEY, WE DON'T HAVE THE EXPERIENCE.
 

Fire2theRain

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Dáil Éireann debate -
Thursday, 7 Feb 2019

Fourth Interim Report of the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes: Statements


Deputy Clare Daly



Unlike Deputy Connolly, I have no respect for The Irish Times but the person whose article brought this information into the public domain is one of its better writers. It is the case that survivors of the mother and baby homes, not to mind politicians, should not be getting their information from The Irish Times or any other media outlet.

This is an incredibly important issue. There is a certain irony in the fact that we are celebrating 100 years of this Parliament and of the Irish State and yet one of our biggest, dirtiest secrets has not been properly examined. It is part of what we are, the way in which women and their children were treated in this State and, as Deputy Joan Collins noted, working-class and poor women in particular. They were hidden behind walls, their babies in many instances were taken from them and they and their children have lived with that trauma to this day. We cannot develop as a State unless we fully acknowledge that and utilise the information available to the State to learn, apologise and give redress. Redress is not a question of money. In many instances it is an acknowledgment of the wrong. When we have raised these issues, the Taoiseach has got up and said sorry but that is not the same thing. It is not a full acknowledgment that we as a society have to take responsibility for this.

It is in that context that we have to examine the fourth interim report of the Mother and Baby Homes Commission of Investigation. In some ways it strikes me as incredibly similar to the children's hospital because the argument is the same. It is an acknowledgement that something has ended up different from the way in which it started out and that while it is not the way it was planned, it has now gone so far down the road that it would be an awful waste to pull back from that. It is a case of being kind of stuck with it, so the only thing that can be done is to go with the flow because it would be madness to waste all the work that is being done.

That is the same argument that was put forward last year. Deputies across this House accepted the bona fides of that argument in good faith, although they did not like it. The survivors certainly did not like it. They were seriously traumatised by that situation, but they accepted it because it was a rational argument to make that we have gone a long way and that the work is complicated. We cannot do that this time around. There is a difference a year on because we have had that conversation. Our job is now to ask whether it is really good enough to say that the commission has got this far and that we should let it finish off the work. We now have to ask why it did not complete the work in the time allotted. Was it that we got it wrong in laying down the terms of reference, because something is wrong? This commission was set up with a budget of €21 million and has run over time by two years. It has therefore rented nice offices on Baggot Street and employed people for two years longer than it was supposed to, yet the budget is unchanged. How could that be? The sums do not add up. Did we get the budget wrong or is something wrong now? I do not have an answer to that. We do not know how it has got this far. One can only draw two conclusions; either this is being done in a monumentally disastrous and ham-fisted way or something more cynical is afoot. They are the only two possible conclusions. This process has been handled so badly. Other Deputies have also made points about its handling.

Let us look at where we are. This interim report said that the commission needs more time. It said that 26 people remain to be interviewed and that these interviews would be done by January. As other Deputies have already asked, have those 26 people been interviewed? The second issue raised in the report is that of a big boat-load of documents which had only recently come into the fray. It said:

The Commission does not yet know the extent of the material in these files but it is likely to run to many thousands of pages. The Commission expects to receive these in December 2018.

Did the commission receive these files in December 2018 as indicated in the interim report? Did the material run to thousands of pages? Based on that information, what is the commission now saying about its likely conclusion date? If one reads the different interim reports one will see that the language in parts of earlier reports is absolutely identical to the language in this one. We cannot have that. The report talks about its considerable workload in cross-referencing documents and about delays in obtaining the evidence from the authorities which ran the institutions which could not be examined until the commission had finished the examination of the documents. These are word-for-word the same in one interim report as in another. What happened in between?

Why is it that a commission set up by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs had to wait until a year after it was supposed to have concluded for that same Department to forward documents? Either we are dealing with the most incompetent shower in the history of the universe or something more sinister is afoot and there are forces obstructing the transfer of this information. I do not have an answer to that. I actually do not know. Nobody has given me a rational explanation, but I have read between the lines where the report talks about the HSE. This is utterly frightening. Again it is an indictment of the very weak media in this State that they fail to scrutinise the real issues relating to what goes on in here and, instead, prefer to chase a cheap headline. They do not actually carry out real scrutiny and did not highlight and examine what is in this report, limited as it is. The commission is shocked that, "the HSE does not have any system, much less a proper system, of storing and archiving material". It finds it, "difficult to understand how relatively recent documentation is not available". What does this public commission mean when it says that? When it says that it is difficult to understand it is really saying that it does not believe it, it cannot understand it, and there is no logical explanation as to why that would be. Why is that the case? I have not heard anything in that regard. These are incredibly serious issues.

The Minister has talked a lot about Tuam and the graves, but that is a separate issue from that of the mother and baby homes commission of investigation. It is tied in, but it is not necessarily what we are talking about here. I strongly support the point made by Deputies who asked for the issues of apology and redress to be taken out of this process. It is scandalous that we have not had an answer on the issue of the Bethany Home. Perhaps I will hear something now, but I have not seen a single word as to why the Bethany Home redress issue cannot be addressed now. This commission, which we set up, has said that the people affected should never have been excluded in the first place. They comprise an ageing cohort of people and yet we are to wait another year before we even look at the issue. That cannot be. The fund is still there and its parameters are still in place. The existing basis of the scheme can be utilised creatively to allow those individuals to get redress. Everybody agrees that they should. What is the point of us all agreeing if these people are dying off in the meantime and our agreement does not lead to legal effects? We have to do something. I really would like the Minister to answer on that because it has not been answered on anywhere. The people affected by the Bethany Home can be dealt with now. There is a mechanism to do so. In an earlier report the commission recommended it be done. What are we waiting for?

That brings me to the other groups and the issue of the apology. We really need to give this far more careful attention. The problem I have with it is that too often in here we set up commissions, send them off to do their work, and then use them as a great excuse to forget about the issues. I have made that point here before. It has not just happened in respect of this commission. The Grace case was the hottest news in town. It was on "Prime Time" and everyone wanted to know about poor Grace. A commission was set up but it has gone on well past its deadline. Who in here even cares to ask about it? Who in the media is keeping an eye on it? Who is keeping an eye on all of the other commissions we have set up at monstrous cost? They never do what they are supposed to do.

I know that people will say that I am one of the people in here who argues hardest for commissions, but they are the only vehicle available. Perhaps the Oireachtas needs to say that they are not really working, not doing their jobs, and not doing what it says on the tin. We bought all of the excuses the Minister has given on the commission's behalf last year. They are not good enough this year. It needs to explain why it said last year that it would deliver in a year. Why should we now believe that it will deliver next year? If we do not ask these questions we are selling everybody short, particularly the survivors.


 
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