Autophagy

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Tadhg Gaelach

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Cheers, Bro: it's rare that anybody compliments me on my lifestyle; I'm used to constant criticism from family and medics.

Sometimes I honestly think it's simple envy that promotes this negative way of thinking. Some people react to me as though I've been given some kind of gift in this life that they haven't. To be tall and thin and healthy seems to be offensive to some, especially if you're happy and balanced with it and couldn't care less what anyone thinks.

(1) Your Grandfather would be similiar to my own: they lived a very simple and frugal life on The Rock Of Cashel during some very hard times during the last century. But both lived long lives: he until seventy-odd, and she until almost ninety with a sixty to eighty a day cigarette habit. That said, my Father died at age forty-four from lung cancer. I've smoked since I was twelve (moron that I am for even beginning) but so far my main life vice hasn't hurt me at all apart from on my chest when I overdo it.

(2) It's not a diet: it's a lifestyle - and permanent and unchangeable one.

(3) My evening meal will usually consist of two or three fresh root vegetables, some fish or poultry, a simple sauce, and no desserts. Nowadays I have no spices or herbs at all on my kitchen rack, only salt, which I only ever add for flavour after cooking. Potatoes, carrots, green beans, cauliflowers, aubergines, peppers, fresh chili, garlic, and ginger, crushed fresh tomatoes, all have flavour if cooked correctly and boiled to death. I rarely eat red meat but will opt for a rare steak whenever it's going. Chicken breasts, legs, wings, are all excellent after simple broiling without sauces. I use all the juices left over from vegetable and meat/preparations to make a quick and simple sauce for food service.

I dislike sugary foods and always have: would rather snack on a fresh carrot than a Mars bar.
I discounted fresh coffee in favour of instant about five years ago: a sin to Finnish people, but hey.
I rarely drink water at all: perhaps a half liter per week of mineral water, and only when absolutely thirsty.
Never understood these people walking around with a liter or half liter of mineral water in their clutched hands.
I smoke too much in the early part of the day, particularly mornings, but come evening I don't smoke tobacco at all.
I take sauna every evening, no matter what the day has been or brought.
Mindfullness and a sense of oneness with oneself is vital to all things in life.
Monitor the body as it speaks, and don't treat it like a spoiled brat: it needs a firm slap every once in a while.

And finally, unless you're actually and medically unwell, pay no attention to what anybody but yourself has to say about what the body needs. Anybody in regular good physical/mental health knows this already. Many doctors are quacks and will try to dump meds on you that you really don't need. I consider Irish GPs to be amongst the worst at this: just walking in their door has them reaching for the prescription dockets.

Find a doctor with an open mind and open heart and talk with them: you'd be surprised which ones are smartest.
Dietologists are like hypnotists: it's all about appearance and show these days, not about wellness.
Dr Eva from Finland might be despised in a Katie Hopkins kind of way, but you know she's right.

As I said already; mine's not a diet, it's my lifestyle born of natural habit.
But I can take it anywhere in the world with me and still be sure I'm in good stead.

It all sounds very healthy, but I have to say that the only people I know who really go for a healthy diet and exercise all look like wrecks - old before their time. Not saying that you look this way, but I find that people who pay a lot of attention to these things usually end up looking a bit like Jordan Peterson.
 

Mowl

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It all sounds very healthy, but I have to say that the only people I know who really go for a healthy diet and exercise all look like wrecks - old before their time. Not saying that you look this way, but I find that people who pay a lot of attention to these things usually end up looking a bit like Jordan Peterson.
Earlier today you posted Santana's 'Soul Sacrifice' on a music thread?

Well, I was born in the sixties and even nowadays people tell me I still look like Michael Shrieve (the very happy and trippy caucasian kid on the drum-set) when I'm at work. The aging process hasn't really begun for me yet. My skin's tight, my muscle mass in excellent condition, my bones are firm at last (I was born with a severe calcium deficiency due to medications prescribed for my Mother during pregnancy) but at this stage in my life they don't break as easily as they did when I was under ten years of age. A time in my life when the staff at Dr Steven's Hospital knew me by name and would ask me which bone this time?

Good health is also a frame of mind: thinking and living positively leads to a general sense of well-being.

Don't waste your life with negative thoughts and negative people acting in negative ways.

Isolation is good for the mind and body; never fear time spent alone - it brings great things to the hopeful.

Never do anything to excess and never deny yourself what you want to try either.

Make rules and break them according to the body's wishes.

That's what the mind is for: you make it up based on the evidence to hand, then change when the evidence changes,

Nobody is stuck to 'one rule for life' that never changes.

Always, always, always question your doctor's decisions thoroughly and then do your own research.

Ensure your conclusions are viable and healthy for you first, then try them.

Never trust people with face-lifts or botox giving you advice: learn to laugh at them for the freaks they are.

Find the things in life that make you feel good and make them part of your lifestyle.

Reject all notions of Gods: it leads to a false sense of security - we get one life, so live it as best you can.

Be nice to yourself on a regular basis: for me, that's sauna and fixed relaxation techniques.

Don't take the body's appearance too seriously - it all goes south in the end anyway.

We all die in the end: just make sure you've lived before you go.

Burn your body when you're finished with it.

Graves are for dinosaurs.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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Earlier today you posted Santana's 'Soul Sacrifice' on a music thread?

Well, I was born in the sixties and even nowadays people tell me I still look like Michael Shrieve (the very happy and trippy caucasian kid on the drum-set) when I'm at work. The aging process hasn't really begun for me yet. My skin's tight, my muscle mass in excellent condition, my bones are firm at last (I was born with a severe calcium deficiency due to medications prescribed for my Mother during pregnancy) but at this stage in my life they don't break as easily as they did when I was under ten years of age. A time in my life when the staff at Dr Steven's Hospital knew me by name and would ask me which bone this time?

Good health is also a frame of mind: thinking and living positively leads to a general sense of well-being.

Don't waste your life with negative thoughts and negative people acting in negative ways.

Isolation is good for the mind and body; never fear time spent alone - it brings great things to the hopeful.

Never do anything to excess and never deny yourself what you want to try either.

Make rules and break them according to the body's wishes.

That's what the mind is for: you make it up based on the evidence to hand, then change when the evidence changes,

Nobody is stuck to 'one rule for life' that never changes.

Always, always, always question your doctor's decisions thoroughly and then do your own research.

Ensure your conclusions are viable and healthy for you first, then try them.

Never trust people with face-lifts or botox giving you advice: learn to laugh at them for the freaks they are.

Find the things in life that make you feel good and make them part of your lifestyle.

Reject all notions of Gods: it leads to a false sense of security - we get one life, so live it as best you can.

Be nice to yourself on a regular basis: for me, that's sauna and fixed relaxation techniques.

Don't take the body's appearance too seriously - it all goes south in the end anyway.

We all die in the end: just make sure you've lived before you go.

Burn your body when you're finished with it.

Graves are for dinosaurs.

Fair play a chara. I wish you many years of healthy life.
 

Heraclitus

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In 2016, Japanese biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi won the Nobel prize for medicine for his research into autophagy. Basically a physiological state the body goes into after approximately 16 hours of fasting.
The basic idea of his research is that the body will go into repair mode once starved of calories. When the body is in a Catabolic state it gets rid of the stuff it needs the least such as toxins and abnormal cells.
Better than that, the body can recycle what's good within these toxins, proteins etc and use them to hasten the repair work.
His research has proven that autophagy can slower the ageing process, improve insulin sensitivity and protect you from and fight cancer cells.
You don't win a Nobel prize for being a quack and his research is being looked into by big pharma so as they can patent a drug that mimics an authophagic state. Surely.....
Maybe Islam and Christianity were onto something with lent and Ramadan.


Long term, 12-14 Hours fasting is sufficient.


 

page61

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Cheers, Bro: it's rare that anybody compliments me on my lifestyle; I'm used to constant criticism from family and medics.

Sometimes I honestly think it's simple envy that promotes this negative way of thinking. Some people react to me as though I've been given some kind of gift in this life that they haven't. To be tall and thin and healthy seems to be offensive to some, especially if you're happy and balanced with it and couldn't care less what anyone thinks.

(1) Your Grandfather would be similiar to my own: they lived a very simple and frugal life on The Rock Of Cashel during some very hard times during the last century. But both lived long lives: he until seventy-odd, and she until almost ninety with a sixty to eighty a day cigarette habit. That said, my Father died at age forty-four from lung cancer. I've smoked since I was twelve (moron that I am for even beginning) but so far my main life vice hasn't hurt me at all apart from on my chest when I overdo it.

(2) It's not a diet: it's a lifestyle - and permanent and unchangeable one.

(3) My evening meal will usually consist of two or three fresh root vegetables, some fish or poultry, a simple sauce, and no desserts. Nowadays I have no spices or herbs at all on my kitchen rack, only salt, which I only ever add for flavour after cooking. Potatoes, carrots, green beans, cauliflowers, aubergines, peppers, fresh chili, garlic, and ginger, crushed fresh tomatoes, all have flavour if cooked correctly and NOT boiled to death. I rarely eat red meat but will opt for a rare steak whenever it's going. Chicken breasts, legs, wings, are all excellent after simple broiling without sauces. I use all the juices left over from vegetable and meat/preparations to make a quick and simple sauce for food service.

I dislike sugary foods and always have: would rather snack on a fresh carrot than a Mars bar.
I discounted fresh coffee in favour of instant about five years ago: a sin to Finnish people, but hey.
I rarely drink water at all: perhaps a half liter per week of mineral water, and only when absolutely thirsty.
Never understood these people walking around with a liter or half liter of mineral water in their clutched hands.
I smoke too much in the early part of the day, particularly mornings, but come evening I don't smoke tobacco at all.
I take sauna every evening, no matter what the day has been or brought.
Mindfullness and a sense of oneness with oneself is vital to all things in life.
Monitor the body as it speaks, and don't treat it like a spoiled brat: it needs a firm slap every once in a while.

And finally, unless you're actually and medically unwell, pay no attention to what anybody but yourself has to say about what the body needs. Anybody in regular good physical/mental health knows this already. Many doctors are quacks and will try to dump meds on you that you really don't need. I consider Irish GPs to be amongst the worst at this: just walking in their door has them reaching for the prescription dockets.

Find a doctor with an open mind and open heart and talk with them: you'd be surprised which ones are smartest.
Dietologists are like hypnotists: it's all about appearance and show these days, not about wellness.
Dr Eva from Finland might be despised in a Katie Hopkins kind of way, but you know she's right.

As I said already; mine's not a diet, it's my lifestyle born of natural habit.
But I can take it anywhere in the world with me and still be sure I'm in good stead.

Would it be rude to ask your age ?
 

page61

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Fasting and giving the body a break can only be good for you .
If I miss a dinner on purpose ,I always feel so relaxed and rested the following day
 

Mowl

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I fast from meat on Fridays in accordance with the rules of the CC. It hasn't killed me yet. :cool:
What, the Catholic church?

Give it time, laddie.

Would it be rude to ask your age ?
No, not at all, page61!

So long as I can offer a reply as cagey as this?

I was born in the mid-to-late sixties - is that enough information?

See, I'm in the music business so I'm relied upon to be ageless and timeless!

I frequently work with musicians half my age, so keeping them comfortable in my company and under my watch necessarily involves white lies for both our sake's. If some of my clients were to know my true age, they might feel that they're working under an old fart with old ideas. In the music game, you must stay abreast of new production values as well as older techniques; the more techniques you have at your disposal, the wider your arsenal. I've no problem discussing my age here on the site, but when in the studio, I'm always dodgy and will answer a question with a question:

'How old do you think I am?'

They usually estimate something fifteen to twenty years short of my actual age.

And that's all that really matters to hungry juniors with stars in their eyes.

I try to keep their stars lit and their hopes close to their achievements.

It's a lot like baby-sitting spoiled brats with big brainy heads and far too much curiosity.

It also keeps me feeling young by being in their company and hearing their points of view, not to mention their ideas.
 

Mowl

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Did I disrespect your choices?
Speaking as a realist, I don't consider there to be any choices; but if you yourself choose to live by a fantasy, then that's all I need to know about you. I mean no disrespect to you on a personal level, but rather to the church you believe in and what history has shown us about those who run it. I say so only because you introduced your religion as a dietary moral law.

Which is patently fucking ridiculous to any right-thinking atheist.
 
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Cheers, Bro: it's rare that anybody compliments me on my lifestyle; I'm used to constant criticism from family and medics.

Sometimes I honestly think it's simple envy that promotes this negative way of thinking. Some people react to me as though I've been given some kind of gift in this life that they haven't. To be tall and thin and healthy seems to be offensive to some, especially if you're happy and balanced with it and couldn't care less what anyone thinks.

(1) Your Grandfather would be similiar to my own: they lived a very simple and frugal life on The Rock Of Cashel during some very hard times during the last century. But both lived long lives: he until seventy-odd, and she until almost ninety with a sixty to eighty a day cigarette habit. That said, my Father died at age forty-four from lung cancer. I've smoked since I was twelve (moron that I am for even beginning) but so far my main life vice hasn't hurt me at all apart from on my chest when I overdo it.

(2) It's not a diet: it's a lifestyle - and permanent and unchangeable one.

(3) My evening meal will usually consist of two or three fresh root vegetables, some fish or poultry, a simple sauce, and no desserts. Nowadays I have no spices or herbs at all on my kitchen rack, only salt, which I only ever add for flavour after cooking. Potatoes, carrots, green beans, cauliflowers, aubergines, peppers, fresh chili, garlic, and ginger, crushed fresh tomatoes, all have flavour if cooked correctly and NOT boiled to death. I rarely eat red meat but will opt for a rare steak whenever it's going. Chicken breasts, legs, wings, are all excellent after simple broiling without sauces. I use all the juices left over from vegetable and meat/preparations to make a quick and simple sauce for food service.

I dislike sugary foods and always have: would rather snack on a fresh carrot than a Mars bar.
I discounted fresh coffee in favour of instant about five years ago: a sin to Finnish people, but hey.
I rarely drink water at all: perhaps a half liter per week of mineral water, and only when absolutely thirsty.
Never understood these people walking around with a liter or half liter of mineral water in their clutched hands.
I smoke too much in the early part of the day, particularly mornings, but come evening I don't smoke tobacco at all.
I take sauna every evening, no matter what the day has been or brought.
Mindfullness and a sense of oneness with oneself is vital to all things in life.
Monitor the body as it speaks, and don't treat it like a spoiled brat: it needs a firm slap every once in a while.

And finally, unless you're actually and medically unwell, pay no attention to what anybody but yourself has to say about what the body needs. Anybody in regular good physical/mental health knows this already. Many doctors are quacks and will try to dump meds on you that you really don't need. I consider Irish GPs to be amongst the worst at this: just walking in their door has them reaching for the prescription dockets.

Find a doctor with an open mind and open heart and talk with them: you'd be surprised which ones are smartest.
Dietologists are like hypnotists: it's all about appearance and show these days, not about wellness.
Dr Eva from Finland might be despised in a Katie Hopkins kind of way, but you know she's right.

As I said already; mine's not a diet, it's my lifestyle born of natural habit.
But I can take it anywhere in the world with me and still be sure I'm in good stead.
If it works for you, that's all thst matter. Another benefit is that you're not spending half your wages on crappy take aways.
Like everything in today's society, the old ways seem the best, even paleo style eating and now science is backing it up.
 
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