Ashanti, Choctaw, Gaelic or Irish?

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PadraigMacLochlainn‏ @PadraigMacL 8h8 hours ago Great to have Chief Gary Batton from the @choctawnationOK with @PaveePoint today to support our Irish Travellers


Great visit today from @choctawnationOK Chief Batton says don't give up the fight for culture and identity http://tinyurl.com/y896qapb

Black Indians? Who Are You?



Black Choctaws

McDonald, McGuire, Murphy, McNeill, McKinney, McGilbry, McCurtain - Ashanti, Choctaw, Gaelic or Irish?

This list of surnames represent the names of the freedmen who were adopted through the Dawes Commission, between 1898 and 1916. This list of Black Choctaws represents the Choctaw freedmen from Oklahoma, and does not represent persons from among the Mississippi Choctaws. - Black Choctaws - African-Native American Genealogy

Among the Mississippi Choctaws

Though seldom mentioned, the records of the Mississippi Choctaw are very valuable in that they provide rich genealogical data for many researchers, of multiple backgrounds. Thousands of families applied for enrollment as Mississippi Choctaws. Most were rejected, and they come from white, black as well as Indian families. They also resided in the east and the west. In order to successfully understand the records of the Mississippi Choctaws, and to successfully find blended families among them, one has to understand the components of the Dawes Records.

Many Choctaws as well as Chickasaws emigrated to Indian Territory in the 1830s, but many also remained in Mississippi. The Curtis Act required the Dawes Commission to created rolls of Choctaws both in Indian Territory as well as one for the Mississippi Choctaws. This was a challenge because prior to that time there had not been a record made in Mississippi of the Choctaws. So prior to 1898, it should be understood that the regular Federal Census records will be needed to follow a family back in time.

When the Dawes Commission began to interview Choctaws in Indian Territory they had a special challenge, because the entire community of Choctaw people were not confined to the Territory–there were many who were still in Mississippi. The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit made provisions for removal to the west, however, Article 14 of the same treaty offered those remaining in the Territory 160 acres of land and US citizenship. As a result, hearings began some 70 years after the signing of the treaty–-in 1899 to interview and identify those remaining in Mississippi, and living among the Choctaw people as Choctaws

The interviews began in Hattiesburg, Mississippi with the charge to “identify” Choctaws who met the requirements and who could go to Indian Territory and obtain land Allotments there.

(1)* The process of “identification” relied heavily on the observance of the Dawes inquirers, who made many generalizations based on appearance. (2)* Basically, if the person “looked” Choctaw or spoke the language he or she was listed. (3) * People applied for listing as Choctaw, by the thousands. The response from people identified as blacks came from several thousand applicants as well.

THE RECORDS

The records of the Mississippi Choctaws themselves have the same classification as the records of other tribes in Indian Territory. There are the Enrollment Cards, the Application Jackets and the Final Rolls. The interviews are intriguing to read, and are of tremendous genealogical value. A majority of those applicants from black families, were rejected, but the genealogical value of these records cannot be overlooked.

What makes these records particularly unique is that family trees were drawn up for many of the families making applications, and they are often multi-generational charts. These are often found in the application jackets alongside lenghthy interviews.

Though the applicants were not “approved”, the value today of the genealogy of those families is outstanding.

The records are located in the same record group of the Five Tribes and have the same National Archives Publication Number. There are literally hundreds of black applications among the Mississippi Choctaws, many of whom were truly mixed with Choctaw ancestry. Their applications were rejected, but this political rejection should not prevent the tenacious genealogist from exploring this valuable record set. - Mississippi Choctaw Genealogy - African-Native American Genealogy
 
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Black Choctaws

McDonald, McGuire, Murphy, McNeill, McKinney, McGilbry, McCurtain - Ashanti, Choctaw, Gaelic or Irish?


The McGilbry name is a variation of Gillebride, and their ancestry can be traced all the way back to the Highlands, at least as far as the 10th and 11th centuries. In theory, Padráig McLochlann is a distant cousin of members of the Black Choctaw, who were enslaved by the Civilized Choctaw.
 
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He's right, we must not give up the fight for our culture and identity but why is only sending this message to Travellers?
- Black Choctaws - African-Native American Genealogy

Read through the surnames on that list. They are mostly Irish, Scottish and old English names as far as I can make out. The gist of the story is that the Choctaw kept slaves. How they acquired the Gaelic and English names I'm not sure, insofar as that some may have been acquired from slaves, and some may have been acquired from slave-owners. They were dubbed one of the 5 Civilized Tribes, because they behaved like Christians, and that behavior included them mimicking the whites and adopting their slave system. I would hazard a guess that in an English speaking world, Gaelic people adopted anglicized names, and those names were given preference above African names.

The Choctaw sent a Chickens Neck to the Irish during the Great Hunger, and I think that is why the Choctaw feel an affiliation to the Travelers, but I don't think the Choctaw were Nomadic, in the same way that other tribes were. I think they originated from the north, and like the Sioux were more into farming than hunting and raiding. Technically speaking, the Travelers have more in common with the Apache.
 

Myles O'Reilly

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What the fukk do we have a Roma centre in Ireland for? I don't mind the kn@ckers having a aul centre but why are we importing Europe's gyppos as well?
 
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What the fukk do we have a Roma centre in Ireland for? I don't mind the kn@ckers having a aul centre but why are we importing Europe's gyppos as well?
Riley - Black Choctaws - African-Native American Genealogy

I found three different branches of my family tree on the Black Choctaw Genealogy table, and I also came across the Riley name. Have you any idea what the f-k is going on, O'Rathlaigh? How did your ancestors get mixed up with the Gaelic nobility in America? I don't think the O'Reilly's ever had so much as a common family crest? How did they get from the Shannon to the States?
 
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Hilliard - Black Choctaws - African-Native American Genealogy

Many Movements, One Struggle | Oakland North


Like much of American history, the “tumultuous” 1960s and 70s are often remembered in black and white. But beyond hippies and desegregation, the era also marked a radical political awakening for Asian, Native American and Chicano communities — and saw the birth of a third world liberation movement inside the heart of the so-called first world.

The Black Panther Party (BPP) played an important role in the political development of non-Black liberation movements. The BPP, founded in Oakland, Calif. in 1966, was a revolutionary organization- calling for a radical, and, if necessary, violent transformation of society that went well beyond the integrationist calls of the earlier decades. Guided by a socialist perspective, the Black Panthers saw capitalism as the root cause of racial injustice and poverty in the United States.

The Panthers’ radical analysis rang true for Native Americans still fighting for land rights and the fulfillment of broken treaties, Chicanos familiar with the conditions of farmworkers, and Japanese Americans who just twenty years before had been labeled a “yellow peril” and corralled into internment camps. Organizations like the American Indian Movement, the Brown Berets and the Red Guard embraced the Panthers’ basic demands for fair housing, employment, health and community control of education and the police.

The term “Third World” in the forging of alliances was not accidental. Globally, the ’60s and ’70s were a time of decolonization and resistance to American and Soviet imperialism or interventionism, particularly in Africa and Asia. The sense of internationalism and solidarity between liberation struggles in the global south had been crystalizing ever since the the 1955 Afro-Asian Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, and heavily influenced the political analysis of Black Panther leaders like Huey P. Newton, who in the late ’60s began to frame the the situation of Black people as a colony within the U.S. - Many Movements, One Struggle | Oakland North




An unlikely alliance

In the post-civil rights era, a militant Black Power movement emerged, with the Black Panther Party for Self Defense forming in 1966. Inspired by Malcolm X and other international black thought leaders, the group embraced armed struggle as a potential tool against organized racial oppression – a radical break from the philosophy of nonviolent protest. A large faction of the group developed in Chicago, where one of the party leaders was a young man named Fred Hampton.

Chicago in the 1960s was a brutal place for poor people. Black, brown and white people all dealt with poverty, unemployment, police violence, substandard housing, inadequate schools and a lack of social services. Ethnic and racial groups each created their own social service and activist networks to combat every kind of oppression.

One was the Young Patriot Organization (YPO), which was based in Hillbilly Harlem, an uptown neighborhood of Chicago populated by displaced white southerners. Many YPO members were racist, and they flaunted controversial symbols associated with southern pride, such as the Confederate flag. But like blacks and Latinos, the white Young Patriots and their families experienced discrimination in Chicago. In their case, it was because they were poor and from the South.

In his short time as a Black Panther leader, Fred Hampton wanted to advance the group’s goals by forming a “Rainbow Coalition” of working class and poor people of all races.

Former members of the Chicago Panthers and YPO tell different versions of the same story of how the groups connected: Each attended the other’s organizing meetings and decided to work together on their common issues. Over time, the Black Panthers learned to tolerate Confederate flags as intransigent signs for rebellion. Their only stipulation was that the white Young Patriots denounce racism.

Eventually, Young Patriots rejected their deeply embedded ideas of white supremacy – and even the Confederate flag – as they realized how much they had in common with the Black Panthers and Latino Young Lords.

Assumed to be natural enemies, these groups united in their calls for economic justice. In the Aug. 9, 1969 issue of The Black Panther newspaper, the party’s chief of staff, David Hilliard, admiringly called the Young Patriots “the only revolutionaries we respect that ever came out of the mother country.” Recalling his work with the YPO, former Black Panther Bobby Lee explained that “The Rainbow Coalition was just a code word for class struggle.” - Chicago 1969: When Black Panthers align


Not alone were the Black Panthers influential in non-white movements, founding members such as David Hilliard had family roots with African and American Indian heritage. I'm not quite sure about Huey Newtons ancestry, but once upon a time, they were close friends.
 
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Beats the sh1t outta me Sir
There was several different categories of deportees, O'Reilly.

A) Street urchins
B) Criminals
C) Prostitutes
D) Rebels
E) Nobels
F) Indentured Servants

O'Reillys were, like all Gaels, of noble stock, but they weren't aristocrats, and certainly had no direct ties to the Royal houses of Lochaber and Tara.

Thus, your ancestors ended up on a plantation with my ancestors, for different reasons. A, B, C, D or F are your choices. A and C can be eliminated from the equation. That means they were transported for stealing an orchard, conspiring to murder members of HM forces in Ireland or that they sold themselves into slavery.
 
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Well those indians certainly did not see blacks as equals and had a law preventing intermarriage.
Civilized Tribe - History of the Choctaw

They weren't called the Five Civilized Tribes for no reason. It's important to know that they adopted the practice, and the Choctaw historian explains why in this documentary. If you haven't got time to watch it, it boils down to their view of the adoption of such economic practices as a survival tool.
 
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