Armistice Day - Time Ireland remembered her dead

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#25
What ever the rights and wrongs of the British or German Empires, it should still be noted that Irish men and woman died for what they believed was their duty and country.

It was a different time, a time when even the idea of a rebellion wasn't that popular and most Irish people were loyal British subjects.

We should as a nation mark and respect those who died, they were Irish and we should never forget them.
Wrong.
Most truly Irish people were very ambivalent about British rule considering how historically harsh and unjust it was .

Indeed the British have never been accepted as having any legal right to occupy Ireland by the vast majority of the population.

Britain attempted to destroy Irelands language and its population.

That can not be forgotten ever.
 
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#27
Died in a foreign war for a foreign King not only that but the poppy includes all British war dead and has been adopted by loyalists.
Nah stick you poppy up your ass and if you an Irish man that wears one then hang your head in shame.
 
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#30
I have long wondered why we Irish hold such hostility to this day, its the biggest loss of life of Irish in any single conflict around the world and yet we sort of cover it up as it were some stain on our existence.

These were Irish people, we should offer them some sort of national remembrance.
At this stage I think it's more hostility to the poppy which as the op states is to remember all British army dead from all conflicts.
I for one would never where a poppy, some other emblem, maybe.
 
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#31
It would have been much better for Europe if Germany had won WW1. WW2 would have been avoided, and really Germany had a better system of government than the English or the French. As for the Irish who were killed in this war, they were just cannon fodder for the British Empire. Their deaths served no purpose of value. We should remember them as victims of imperialism. The last thing we should do is get sucked into the English régimes exercise in Poppy population control and justification of current imperialist wars against brown skinned people.
I agree that Irish and also the test of the soldiers were cannon fodder, but your devotion to the Maniac Hitler is indicative of the kind of person you are.

Murdering millions of people of difference is a policy you totally support.
 
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#34
it should be ripped off them and fucked the ground
This post reveal that the poppy remains a controversial and divisive political symbol.

It is less neutral even than a political flag because of its direct connection with British militarism.

In Ireland that British militarism was historically very very ugly indeed and most Irish men who joined the British army did so either from economic necessity or a truly youthful and thoroughly misplaced sense of adventure.

Very very few real Irish men joined the British army out of loyalty to the crown and those who did were 90% protestant and never had any allegiance or support for Irish independence.
 
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#35
It can be quite amusing to hear atheists speak of honouring the dead, while they simultaneously claim that the dead are now the sum total of zero. Who or what are they honouring? It's like claiming to honour a rock or a tree because it fell on a tank.
So much bs!

I doubt that there were few more than a handful of Irishmen who sacrificed themselves for an ideal or principle during ww1. Sacrifice was the last thing they wanted. Most joined up for other reasons, mostly to do with having little choice, and would have happily left the battlefield to return to their families.

Ww2 was a different matter. The fight was against evil.
 
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#36
This post reveal that the poppy remains a controversial and divisive political symbol.

It is less neutral even than a political flag because of its direct connection with British militarism.

In Ireland that British militarism was historically very very ugly indeed and most Irish men who joined the British army did so either from economic necessity or a truly youthful and thoroughly misplaced sense of adventure.

Very very few real Irish men joined the British army out of loyalty to the crown and those who did were 90% protestant and never had any allegiance or support for Irish independence.
What I find offensive about the ruling class push for the poppy in Ireland is that it represents WW1 Irishmen in the BA as victims. In one sense they were victims of imperialism & capitalism.

That is true. But they were also killers. If we take an estimate for Irish dead in WW1, say 30K, we can assume they killed a similar number of Austrians, Hungarians, Germans, Turks etc.
It is undoubtedly true that in the period 1914---1918 Irishmen killed more people than at any time in our history. That merits reflection, even penitence.

But not once have I heard any of the Irish poppy cheerleaders express the slightest solidarity with the dead of those nations. Ireland was in a unique position to reach out to those peoples and fashion a true symbol of fraternity and remembrance and reconciliation.
But of course the Irish ruling class,. which has never had a profound or original idea in it's life, was content to unthinkingly copy the British.


This post reveal that the poppy remains a controversial and divisive political symbol.

It is less neutral even than a political flag because of its direct connection with British militarism.

In Ireland that British militarism was historically very very ugly indeed and most Irish men who joined the British army did so either from economic necessity or a truly youthful and thoroughly misplaced sense of adventure.

Very very few real Irish men joined the British army out of loyalty to the crown and those who did were 90% protestant and never had any allegiance or support for Irish independence.
 
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