Armistice Day - Time Ireland remembered her dead

SwordOfStCatherine

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#13
What ever the rights and wrongs of the British or German Empires, it should still be noted that Irish men and woman died for what they believed was their duty and country.

It was a different time, a time when even the idea of a rebellion wasn't that popular and most Irish people were loyal British subjects.

We should as a nation mark and respect those who died, they were Irish and we should never forget them.
The London Ruling Elite had people from our country fighting for them to make fast both Home Rule and its rejection, mad situation which makes Pearse's actions understandable. I think people should be free to wear a Poppy without drama, as I do, but at the same time the ROI state engaging in WWI would be undermining of it- in a united Ireland things would be different but that is not on the horizion and everyone wearing Poppies in the South would not make it so.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#14
I am wearing my Poppy, I have always done so this time of year since I can remember and I will stand against anyone who would try to stop me, however I think threads like this border on trolling. People should just be left to honour their dead and get on with it. People have been fooled with good motives into fighting unjust wars that their rulers had evil motives in- honouring their sacrifice is not honouring the scum who led them to their deaths. Life is complex.

I have absolutely no problem with you wearing a Poppy, but you will find that 99% of Southerners who wear a Poppy are not doing it for the reasons that you are. They are doing it as part of their war on Gaelic Ireland.

As you say, life is complex. No doubt the great majority of people in Britain are wearing Poppies out of sincere remembrance. But, we know well that the régime has other motivations. And the primary motivation they have is to justify current imperial adventures.
 

Tadhg Gaelach

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#15
What ever the rights and wrongs of the British or German Empires, it should still be noted that Irish men and woman died for what they believed was their duty and country.

It was a different time, a time when even the idea of a rebellion wasn't that popular and most Irish people were loyal British subjects.

We should as a nation mark and respect those who died, they were Irish and we should never forget them.

Well, I wouldn't agree with that logic. We shouldn't ignore that they were part of a rotten campaign. We have even had some lunatics here holding commemorations for Irish men who were killed in India suppressing Indian patriots. My sympathy is with those Indian patriots, not with the Irish soldiers who died keeping India British.
 
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#16
The purpose of remembrance is to learn and grow with that remembrance. To understand the mechanics of these things and apply those lessons to the betterment of mankind.

Otherwise remembrance is just swaying in the breeze in dazed impotence. There's no point nor honour in that.

And this business were one wears the red poppy alongside people who then go off and arm cannibals to destroy ordinary Syrian people or who demolished Iraq in this big "mistake" of theirs or play dirty in wars in Ireland and then accept them as somehow fit to referee "remembrance" ceremonies. I wouldn't contemplate partaking in what is a perverse popularity-raising exercise for their establishment.

With the white poppy one, at least, stands aside from those criminals and one becomes more thoughtful than the herd. That's honouring the dead. That's a stand rather than just dazed swaying in the breeze with a vacant frown on one's face. The fact that the red poppy is the avatar of the Afghan opium trade is darkly fitting.
 
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#17
One thing about recruitment in WW I was that Irish Protestants were much more likely to enlist than Catholics.

In fact 45% of recruits from Ireland during the war were Protestants. I think it's quite likely many Catholic families had no-one in the British army. So it's not surprising many Catholics had no interest in commemorating the war.

I know this is a sectarian angle, but Ireland in 1914-18 was a fairly sectarian place.

.
 

Asif

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#18
One thing about recruitment in WW I was that Irish Protestants were much more likely to enlist than Catholics.

In fact 45% of recruits from Ireland during the war were Protestants. I think it's quite likely many Catholic families had no-one in the British army. So it's not surprising many Catholics had no interest in commemorating the war.

I know this is a sectarian angle, but Ireland in 1914-18 was a fairly sectarian place.

.
Eh?

45% of recruits from Ireland were Protestants? That would suggest 55% were Catholic, and you say Protestants were more likely to enlist?

 

Karloff

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#22
When Leo goes to celebrate WW1 with his Poppy what flag should he be using?

Shouldn't he use the Union Jack for the occasion after all those men joined the army whose flag was the Jack. It seems inappropriate to involve the Irish Tricolour in this event. Maybe it is the next stop in project 'improve paddy'? Could we get in touch with Joe Duffy to kickstart the campaign?
#OurUnionJack
 

Catalpa

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#23
Saw two people today in Blanch S.C. wearing a Poppy

I wouldn't wear it myself but each to their own I suppose

If I would wear a Poppy it would be a White one....
 
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#24
I have long wondered why we Irish hold such hostility to this day, its the biggest loss of life of Irish in any single conflict around the world and yet we sort of cover it up as it were some stain on our existence.

These were Irish people, we should offer them some sort of national remembrance.
No.
These Irish people fought for an empire that not only wrecked and raped Ireland for 800 years but denied Irish people basic rights for centuries.
 
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